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  • THE DEFINITIVE ARBOR REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE FOR TS3650

    THE DEFINITIVE ARBOR REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE!!!!!

    WARNING: I AM NOT A PRO, YOU TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR WHAT HAPPENS TO YOUR SAW IF YOU ATTEMPT ANY OF THE FOLLOWING:

    BEFORE YOU START DO THE FOLLOWING:
    1. unplug your saw
    2. remove the blade and blade guard on the underside of the table
    3. lower blade height to as low as it will go
    4. remove the belt (lift up the motor to make this easier)
    5. remove the belt guard attached to the motor (optional but I found that it was always in my way so I just took it off)
    6. crank your saw to a 45 degree bevel to gain access to the pulley-side of the arbor, all work is done at this setting

    SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT BEFORE YOU DECIDE TO REPLACE THE ARBOR YOURSELF:
    Despite what you might think, replacing your arbor IS a difficult task and you ARE better off getting it done professionally. Now you may be thinking what I thought, "How the hell am I supposed to get my saw to a repair place?" Fear not, you only need to take out the arbor sub-assembly, a group of parts that weighs less than 10 pounds, fits in one hand, and is removed by slipping off ONE retaining ring, that’s it!

    I read up on how to replace the arbor until I was blue in the face; NOWHERE did I read about taking out the arbor sub-assembly as a means toward making replacement a snap. All directions suggested you take out the arbor from the saw separately. This is a flawed tactic as it requires WAAAAAAAY more effort than simply taking out the entire sub-assembly.

    Referring to the schematic drawing, the key to this entire procedure is little ‘ole part 45. PART 45 is the ONLY thing (besides friction) holding on the ENTIRE arbor sub-assembly. What I’m calling the arbor sub-assembly includes:
    (see link at bottom for drawings)
    1. The arbor shaft #54
    2. The keyway key #53
    3. The blade-side bearing #49
    4. The arbor housing #50
    5. The pulley-side bearing #49
    6. The snap ring retainer #48
    7. The arbor pulley #47
    8. The arbor housing washer #44
    9 and the all important retaining ring #45

    REMOVAL OF THE ARBOR SUB-ASSEMBLY:
    • Your options are simple:
    o Follow the simple steps for removing the arbor sub-assembly
    o OR
    o Take your ENTIRE saw with you to the repair shop
    • The other alternatives involve removal of many more parts and a lot more labor

    1) THERE IS ONLY ONE STEP TO REMOVE ARBOR SUB-ASSEMBLY:
    a) You must remove the retaining ring #45
    i) To do this you need a flat head screw driver and a hammer
    ii) Place the flat head against the edge of #45 so that when you hit the screwdriver it will force the ring off the rod. Tap the end of the screwdriver with the hammer until the retaining ring pops off. (This may appear hard to do at first glance, but it will pop off fairly easily, the hard part being positioning the screwdriver and finding an angle to tap it with the hammer all inside the saw)
    b) Once you get #45 off, the washer #44 comes off and then you can pull off #50, taking the arbor shaft, pulley, and bearings off with it.
    c) Once you have that entire assembly out of the saw you THEN can decide if you want to go further or if you want to simply take that entire group of parts to the repair center.

    THE DECISION TO CONTINUE OR LET THE PRO’S GO TO WORK:

    If you have a repair center within a 20 minute driving distance, it is a far better move to take the sub-assembly to them rather than to attempt to go any further. The process for replacement done by a pro shouldn't take more than 15 to 20 minutes. Take driving to and fro and the repair, you're looking at 1 hour total with no frustration, no scuffed knuckles, no broken parts, no mistakes.

    IF YOU MUST DO IT YOURSELF READ ON BUT BE SURE TO READ EVERYTHING BEFORE ACTUALLY HITTING ANYTHING!:

    With the housing out of the saw, you can comfortably work where ever you choose. It’s best if you can clamp the sub-assembly in a vise of some kind but not essential. Your biggest task when replacing the arbor yourself is attempting to keep the bearings in place. Most specifically, when the arbor is hammered out of the housing, you want to keep the blade-side bearing in the housing. If you don't add some clamps it WILL pop out. If you were to hammer the arbor and NOT have it come out, then you must consider yourself the luckiest person on the face of the earth.

    TO GET THE ARBOR OUT OF SUB-ASSEMBLY:
    1. Loosen the pulley set screw
    2. Pull off the pulley from the arbor shaft, be careful not to lose the keyway key (small piece of metal that keeps the pulley aligned)
    3. Remove the snap ring clip #48
    a. this can best be removed with snap ring pliers. These are specifically designed to remove such a ring and cost about $10 each for el cheapo. DO NOT DESTROY THIS SNAP RING, SPEND THE $10, BUY THE RIGHT TOOL AND SAVE YOURSELF A HEADACHE.
    4. Now begin hammering the arbor out. I found it would only come out with fairly good whacks from a metal hammer. Once it gets close to the pulley-side bearing don’t risk damaging that by continuing to whack it. I found a small socket worked fine to punch the arbor through. If you are one of the luckiest persons on the face of the earth and your blade-side bearing stayed in place, your life just got a whole lot easier.

    SO YOU DIDN’T LISTEN AND NOW THE BEARING IS STUCK TO THE ARBOR:
    First, I told you so, but let’s continue…

    Unless you have specialty tools designed for pulling bearings off metal rods, you will not get that bearing off without destroying it and possibly the old arbor. I got mine off using vise grips and a hammer (a process that made the bearing and the arbor useless once they were separated. Realize that because of the arbor flange (the part that the blade rests against, you really can't get at the bearing very well.

    THE BOTTOM LINE IS THIS: if that bearing popped out, you now have only one option:

    PURCHASE A NEW BEARING:
    So you're sitting there with a bearing stuck to the arbor, now what. Basically, don't waste your time searching high and low for a replacement bearing. I went to 7 different places and none of them had exactly what I needed. I called Ridgid and they said it would take 20 business days to get it, so basically my only option was to drive to that repair place that I didn’t want to drive to in the first place.

    The repair place close to me had several of the bearings; obviously this may not be the case with your locality so you may need to plan in advance. The bearing you need is #6202NSE. #6202 is a common bearing number, however, you must verify the inside diameter (the hole) and outside diameter to know for a fact if it’s going to fit before driving off. The only way to verify this is with dial calipers since they may appear to be the same when looking at them. All the five places I went had something close, but all were a few thousandths of an inch too small on the inside diameter (the part the arbor goes through) meaning you wouldn’t be able to get it on the shaft. My repair place had several variety and we found one that fit. It has to be 5/8 to fit the shaft.

    So really think about it. If you don’t have the extreme good luck to have your bearing stay in place when you hammer out the arbor, you will need to replace the bearing because you’ll destroy it trying to take it off. If you’re just going to end up driving to the repair place to get a new bearing, then why not avoid the headache and take the entire arbor sub-assembly with you and let THEM deal with it? It just makes WAAAAAAY more sense. If you don’t live anywhere close to a repair place, my suggestion is to FIRST BUY A NEW SET OF BEARINGS (get two just in case). WAIT UNTIL YOU HAVE THE NEW BEARINGS IN HAND BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO REPALCE THE ARBOR, that way if things go wrong you won’t be upset. A stitch in time saves nine.

    ONCE IT’S OUT NOW FOR THE NEW ONE:
    Ok, so you’ve got out the old arbor, you’ve got two good bearings, and the new arbor shaft, at this point you’ll need some tools to MASH them all together. You will not be able to simply slide the new arbor in place. Getting it on those bearings is a chore and cannot be done with man-power alone.

    To squeeze the new arbor through the housing and keep the bearings in place I created a poor man’s press. It consists of two heavy duty corner brackets and two clamps. Go to the home center and pick up a couple of heavy duty corner brackets (The kind with a big hole in it for attaching to a sill plate or something, see picture of something similar). If you can find a metal plates with holes in them just use those. So I’d recommend going to Home Depot with your arbor and find something that it fits through slightly, like I said, very heavy duty angle brace worked great.

    Ok, so now you just make a sandwich with the components that go together. Looking at the diagram it’s easy to figure out what goes where. Once you’ve got all the parts lined up, you take one angle iron piece and slide it over the threads giving you a clamping surface where the blade would be. You then slide the other angle iron piece over the opposite end where the pulley-side bearing is, again giving you a clamping surface. I found two 4” C clamps JUST fit over this metal sandwich, but you can use any clamps you have (just use two to keep the clamping faces parallel to each other). Once you’ve assembled your poor man’s press, tighten your clamps to press the bearings into place. You know you’re done when you can get the snap ring back in place on the pulley-side of the arbor.

    Once you’ve got the bearings set into place on the new arbor, then you are pretty much done. .At this point reassemble your saw by attaching the snap ring, arbor pulley, and lastly the sub-assembly to the saw. Once it’s back in the saw reattach the belt guard, reinstall the belt, blade, blade guard, and you’re set.

    I hope this was helpful. If I left anything out I’m sorry. I am not a professional and if you messed up your saw I’m sorry.

    [ 08-01-2005, 09:37 PM: Message edited by: Thomas Puzio ]

  • #2
    http://www.woodworking.com/dcforum/D...D8/8193.html#9

    these are the images, since i can't upload them here (rather don't know how to)

    [ 08-01-2005, 09:37 PM: Message edited by: Thomas Puzio ]

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: THE DEFINITIVE ARBOR REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE FOR TS3650

      OK, so I have slacked long enough and have just now decided to replace my defective arbor (thread relief issue). I have searched the old forums and come up with the thread I am replying to as a procedure to remove the arbor assembly and then remove the arbor from the assembly.

      I have a problem with step "b" in the arbor assembly removal process and need some help. Has anyone removed the ARBOR ASSEMBLY?

      1) THERE IS ONLY ONE STEP TO REMOVE ARBOR SUB-ASSEMBLY:
      a) You must remove the retaining ring #45
      i) To do this you need a flat head screw driver and a hammer
      ii) Place the flat head against the edge of #45 so that when you hit the screwdriver it will force the ring off the rod. Tap the end of the screwdriver with the hammer until the retaining ring pops off. (This may appear hard to do at first glance, but it will pop off fairly easily, the hard part being positioning the screwdriver and finding an angle to tap it with the hammer all inside the saw)
      b) Once you get #45 off, the washer #44 comes off and then you can pull off #50, taking the arbor shaft, pulley, and bearings off with it.


      I have sucessfully removed the #45 snap ring, and washer. Unfortunately, when I try to pull the arbor assembly off it is getting stuck on something. It drops very smoothly the first ~1/8", but then makes a very solid impact with something else and I am not sure what it is hung up on. I can see that if I don't swing the angle out far enough it would hit threaded rod that controls blade tilt, but I have made sure I am past that. It does not look like it is hitting the threaded rod that controls the blade height either.
      Does anyone know if there is a missing step here?

      I have tried to pull the assembly off at all angles of blade tilt and height. Before I start removing those mechanisms I want to see if anyone else has tried this.

      Any advice?

      Thanks!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: THE DEFINITIVE ARBOR REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE FOR TS3650

        Hey guys,

        I'm considering buying a used TS3650. What's up with the arbor? When I go look at this saw, anything particular I should look at to see if it is similarly afflicted?

        --------
        Roland

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: THE DEFINITIVE ARBOR REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE FOR TS3650

          This is a post from 2005. There was a problem with some early saws but it has been fixed. The threads on the early saws did not go all the way down. It caused the bottom of dados to not be flat.
          SSG, U.S. Army
          Retired
          K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: THE DEFINITIVE ARBOR REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE FOR TS3650

            Ah, yes - missed that little detail on the OP. ss123's post from yesterday bumped the thread and I got the idea it was recent. Thanks for explaining that.

            ---------
            Thanks,

            Roland

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: THE DEFINITIVE ARBOR REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE FOR TS3650

              Thanks for the information. Unfortunately i also cannot get the subassembly off after removing part 45 and the washer. i moves about 1/8th inch and then stops. Any further advice would be appreciated.
              Thanks again
              Wayne

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: THE DEFINITIVE ARBOR REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE FOR TS3650

                What is the trick to getting the key off the arbor shaft? Do I just need to pull harder or what?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: THE DEFINITIVE ARBOR REPLACEMENT PROCEDURE FOR TS3650

                  Originally posted by wlarkan View Post
                  Thanks for the information. Unfortunately i also cannot get the subassembly off after removing part 45 and the washer. i moves about 1/8th inch and then stops. Any further advice would be appreciated.
                  Thanks again
                  Wayne
                  I had to use a crowbar... not sure why... but I did finally get it off.

                  Comment

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