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    I have a quick question about the worth of the forrest woodworker 2. Is it worth the money,and should I get the thin kerf blade for my 2424 table saw
    Thanks tim

  • #2
    My suggestion, buy one from a retailer with a good return policy. If you don't like it, send it back.

    I sent two back, stayed with separate rip and crosscut blades. More expensive, but I get better results this way.

    Dave

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    • #3
      I would stay away from thin kerf blades. Any increase in "power" the thin kerf will give you will be offset by a deacrease in cut quality.

      Jake

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      • #4
        I bought the Woodworker II (regular kerf) for my TS2424. I have not used it extensively, but on the home projects I have done it cut really nice. It leaves an almost polished edge even on crosscuts in pine. I have a good friend who has been taking furniture building classes for the past year. He, and the woodworkers that are teaching him swear by it.

        I did quite a bit of looking and comparing to the Freud blades which are also very good. However, I chose the WWII because it seemed to be a better all purpose blade. Can't say I was happy to spend quite so much though.

        Amazon has a pretty good price: around $100. Also, no sales tax and it may qualify for their free shipping. You can also check out their online reviews. If you are near any of the locations on the "Woodworking Shows" tour, Forrest is (was) selling them at the show for $89.00.
        Mark

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        • #5
          I bought the WWII about eight months ago. The first one, the welds started to come off the carbide tips, very dangerous, they replaced it. I am not completly happy with it. After about six months of use it needs to be sharpened, small knicks on point of tips. I called and asked them about it and they told me not to cut nails. I have never cut any nails with it.
          Last weekend we had a WW show here in town and bought a blade from In-line Industries (maker of the DUBBY sled). Iam very happy with it so far. Cuts are smoother than the WWII. At the show he was ripping a piece of pine and stoped in the middle to show no burning. I have tried doing that on cherry, elm, walnut, hickory and the only burn was on the hickory, very little though. Much cheaper also, $89.00, if you buy the Dubby he knocks of $10.00. Heres thier web site, http://in-lineindustries.1hwy.com/. Did not see the blade on the site but I'm sure you could call him and order one.
          Good Luck.

          [ 03-02-2002: Message edited by: homric ]

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          • #6
            I have WW 2 and use it about 80% of the time..I like it and have had ONLY GREAT results. I also have A CHOPMASTER 12" in miter saw, again GREAT CUTS, use it about95% of time. I have B & D, Freud 10" and others that just hang on thw wall about 90% of the time. I flinched about the Forrest price but I feel that in the long run it was money saved. Forest will resharpen for free twice on their blades so you figure sharpening cost you come out ok I feel...dd

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            • #7
              Jake,

              Can you explain how thin kerf blades produce lower quality cuts than regular kerf blades?

              Just curious,

              Jeff

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              • #8
                The thinner kerf means less steel, meaning less rigidity in the blade body. The problem really shows up on miter saws. Miter and/or bevel cuts can really put a lot of side load on the blade and if the blade lacks the rigidity needed you will see some deflection in the cut.

                Jake

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                • #9
                  My experience is that thin-kerf blades are as bad or worse on tablesaws as on miter saws. Won't catch me using them again.

                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    (Gotta be at least one dissenting opinion). My TK Forrest WWII works like a charm on a TS2424-equivalent Craftsman. I will admit to putting on a 24 t. rip blade (0.126" kerf) when doing a lot of, or thick ripping, but otherwise the WWII handles the chores very well. Last night I was cutting small pieces of 1/8" thick Lauan plywood for box bottoms. Expected to get a lot of tearout and need to go find the plywood blade (wherever it might be). Nope, cuts smooth and tear-free in both directions. Ditto results of xcuts and miters in cherry pieces (no burn).

                    I don't see how much more glass-smooth surfaces could be with a dedicated crosscut blade. I also don't understand the post about a WWII falling apart. Mine from Woodcraft (couple of bucks more, of course) looks like it was made by a jeweler. It also does not suffer resin buildup as quick as other blades I have owned.

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                    • #11
                      I also have a WWII thin kerf blade. Forrest reccommeds a blade stiffner which acts similar to a stablizer. But they will not warranty a blade if you use anyone elses. If you catch them at a woodworking show you can save several dollars.

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