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  • Anti-restart devices

    OSHA just cited a contractor that I work with for a violation of 29CFR1926.304(f) for not having an anti-restart device on their Rigid TS2410LS table saw on a construction site. OSHA claimed that the anti-restart device is required by section 3.1.3(c) of the 1954 ANSI Woodworking standard (rv. 1961). That standard has been supersceded by the 1992 ANSI standard, but OSHA claims they have not adopted the 1992 standard, and hence the 1954 standard has to be followed, and that requires the anti-restart device on any table saw on any construction site. An anti-restart device is a magnetic drop out switch, so that if the power is lost, the saw will not automatically restart if it was left in the on position when the power comes back on. Has anyone else ever faced this situation?

  • #2
    Re: Anti-restart devices

    I almost lost my hand when I worked at a shoe factory.
    Power went out. I was leaning on my machine shooting' the $hit when the power returned. Close one.

    I think the anti-restart devices can be a PIA sometimes but for safety sakes they are a good idea.
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    • #3
      Re: Anti-restart devices

      I have not heard of this before you brought it up, but I certainly want to learn more. A while back I started a the ad about a device now offered that will prevent a power tool from restarting. Woodcraft sells it but I don't remember the name. The thread was back before Christmas I think, I'll look for it.
      ---------------
      Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
      ---------------
      “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
      ---------
      "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
      ---------
      sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Anti-restart devices

        http://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/t35532/

        Here it is.
        ---------------
        Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
        ---------------
        “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
        ---------
        "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
        ---------
        sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Anti-restart devices

          Interesting. While I was not aware of the OSHA requirement, it does make me wonder about the validity of the claim by the particular OSHA inspector. Could he be the only inspector questioning this?

          While I can definitely see and would agree to the required need, it does make me wonder how many "contractor" or even "cabinet" saws meet this requirement. One would think (and certainly hope) that manufacturer's such as Ridgid (and especially Emerson Electric) would ensure that their tools would meet OSHA requirements for on for commercial worksites.

          Does the professional plumbing machines like Ridgid's pipe threaders have these magnetic switches? Or are those particular machines somehow exempt by thier design or application. And, what about other brands and types of woodworking machinery? I don't recall ever seeing any stationary power tools labeled as "not for commercial or industrial use". Certainly there must be thousands of cabinet shops, kitchen counter places, and others in the industry that are using commonly available woodworking tools like we have in our home shops.

          Maybe the OSHA requirement is defined by the number of people employed or something? It would be interesting to know.

          CWS

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          • #6
            Re: Anti-restart devices

            Originally posted by Bob D. View Post

            Thanks Bob. I think I'm going to be ordering a couple of those. I too use a single outlet with cord for my TS, router table, oscillating sander and planer and another outlet/cord at the other end of the shop for the other tools. That's not a lot of money to spend to keep from having a very unpleasant surprise. I got surprised just the other day, when I turned on my router before I'd switched plugs; it started up when I did switch the plugs, no damage done, but surprising none the less.

            BTW, I have a Rockler remote switch for my dust collector. That will not restart the DC following a power outage or even a 'blip' during a thunderstorm.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Anti-restart devices

              While they may be a PITA, they are still a good idea. Especialy on a jobsite where multiple people could be using the same tool.
              Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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              • #8
                Re: Anti-restart devices

                OK, here's how the section currently reads on OSHA's website today (8/11/11):

                29CFR1296.304(f)

                Other requirements. All woodworking tools and machinery shall meet other applicable requirements of American National Standards Institute, 01.1-1961, Safety Code for Woodworking Machinery.

                http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/sear...URRENT&p_title =


                And here is a summary of the referenced document. I couldn't find the 1961 edition, this is the oldest one I could see(1972), and its been updated at least twice since then. Strange that OSHA still refers to the superceeded version.

                Document Summary

                Title(s): English -- Woodworking Machinery - Safety Requirements (WMMA O1.1)

                Organization: ANSI Authored by: ANSI - American National Standards Institute

                Scope: This standard covers the safety requirements for the design, installation, care and use of woodworking machinery and accessory equipment, used in industrial and commercial applications, having a total connected power of 5 hp (3.7kw) or greater, or having 3-phase wiring.

                Machine types excluded: Power tools intended to be handheld in use, assembly machines, finish application equipment, primary panel product manufacturing machinery, cooperage machinery, sawmills, and machinery covered by other American National Standards are excluded from this standard.

                Purpose: The purpose of this standard is to establish the safety requirements for the design, installation, care and use of woodworking machinery and accessory equipment covered by this standard.
                *****

                So IF the TS they had were using was in an industrial or commercial locations/application AND was powered by a 3 phase motor (which seems unlikely) AND/OR the motor rated HP was 5 or more, THEN the standard cited would appear to be applicable.
                Last edited by Bob D.; 08-12-2011, 07:12 AM.
                ---------------
                Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
                ---------------
                “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
                ---------
                "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
                ---------
                sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Anti-restart devices

                  I have a GFI breaker extention cord, if power is lost the breaker opens the curcuit and will not close until power is regained and you physically press the reset on the GFI block. Its one of those 3 outlet spliters and is a couple ft long at most.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Anti-restart devices

                    That is the problem exactly. The current ANSI standards do NOT require anti-restart devices on table saws less than 5HP and not 3 phase. The problem is that OSHA has not adopted the current standard for Construction. They have for General Industry, which is just ridiculous, but not for construction. So in this case, the cabinet manufacturer came out to do the install and received the citation. OSHA admits that the newer ANSI standard exempts job site table saws, but the new ANSI standard can ONLY be followed if it is LESS restrictive than the earlier verision that OSHA has adopted. They admit that thay are way behind the curve ball in updateing their adoption of ANSI standards, but they have no alternative to enforce the 1954 standard, rev. 1961, which is not even in print anymore. So beware if you have a table saw on a jobsite without an anti-retarte device.

                    Originally posted by Bob D. View Post
                    OK, here's how the section currently reads on OSHA's website today (8/11/11):

                    29CFR1296.304(f)

                    Other requirements. All woodworking tools and machinery shall meet other applicable requirements of American National Standards Institute, 01.1-1961, Safety Code for Woodworking Machinery.

                    http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/sear...URRENT&p_title =


                    And here is a summary of the referenced document. I couldn't find the 1961 edition, this is the oldest one I could see(1972), and its been updated at least twice since then. Strange that OSHA still refers to the superceeded version.

                    Document Summary

                    Title(s): English -- Woodworking Machinery - Safety Requirements (WMMA O1.1)

                    Organization: ANSI Authored by: ANSI - American National Standards Institute

                    Scope: This standard covers the safety requirements for the design, installation, care and use of woodworking machinery and accessory equipment, used in industrial and commercial applications, having a total connected power of 5 hp (3.7kw) or greater, or having 3-phase wiring.

                    Machine types excluded: Power tools intended to be handheld in use, assembly machines, finish application equipment, primary panel product manufacturing machinery, cooperage machinery, sawmills, and machinery covered by other American National Standards are excluded from this standard.

                    Purpose: The purpose of this standard is to establish the safety requirements for the design, installation, care and use of woodworking machinery and accessory equipment covered by this standard.
                    *****

                    So IF the TS they had were using was in an industrial or commercial locations/application AND was powered by a 3 phase motor (which seems unlikely) AND/OR the motor rated HP was 5 or more, THEN the standard cited would appear to be applicable.

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