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  • #16
    David: Yea. One inch thick legset ought to take care of any twisting problem!!! Should be .090/not .900!!! First mistake this week! Thanks!

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    • #17
      Having only seen the picture of the 3650----but, having an earlier Craftsman verion----I can tell you that proper stretcher support if essential. The old Craftsman design didn't have any. When they added bracing on the 2424/3612---it was a needed improvement. I noted on mine, that even the slightest extra weight was all it took for the legs to twist---I added my own stretchers.

      It would be intereting to see, if either the "cab forward" design or addition of heavier (?) wings pushed the limit on the legs. The good news is that the problem can be fixed with added stretchers.
      Dave

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      • #18
        Thanks Bob for the feedback. I have wondered whether the shape of the legs contributed to the motion... unfortunately I do not have a 3612 around to compare to. All bolts are nice and tight. I am thinking of adding some angle aluminum on the sides to help tie the top of the legs to the saw body. Is that needed??? I will let you know if it makes a diffence [img]smile.gif[/img]

        Is it really a problem?? As of right now I have not done anything of size or mass that would indicate a problem or cause the machine to twist while in use. I should probably try a full size sheet of plywood and see what happens.

        Bob, I appreciate the fact that you have taken the time to look into this and provide your input. I am extremely pleased with the saw and glad I made the choice to purchase it. This is an excellent forum for people to get ideas on questions out to many different people at many different levels of experience... as long as emotions are kept in check
        \"It is better to be careful 100 times than killed once\"<br />Mark Twain

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        • #19
          I just finished setup of my new TS3650, I fuond this forum afterwards. A few of you have already voiced concerns I had about the fasteners (mixed metric/SAE) and other problems. One thing that I did not see mentioned so far was why do they tell you to put the handwheels on as one of the first steps then upright the table rolling it towards the front (where the elevation handwheel is)? I removed both of mine until uprighted so as not to take a chance on damaging them or bending a shaft.

          I had the mysterious fifth bolt for the front rail left over too and also elected not to take it off as the rail seems fine w/o it.

          Also, the drive belt installation and alignment section of the manual needs some work/refinement, sorta confusing.

          During assembly I made many installation notes in the manual margins as I went along but don't have the manual here to make comments from.

          I also noticed the lack of a small parts list though I liked the blister packs which made it easy to find the required fastener for a particular step. The manual needs to be sync'd with the hardware though as in a number of steps you are referred to use a particular SAE wrench and the fastener head is metric

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          • #20
            Manuals - what instruction manuals

            The Howdy-Doody "concept plans", er manuals out there are frustrating and sometimes frightening.
            These forums and help by others is only way some ever get assembled I think. And frankly think Rigid is one of better I've ever run across

            Goes back many years tho - my late '50 and '60 vintage Auston Healeys had manual listing SAE/metric and that was a time that it was unheard of. Used to make me nuts. So I became "nuts and bolts" and guess am more tolerant of it after 40 years of training.
            But why????
            Wish I had the answers ..... even half of \'em

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            • #21
              The sloppiness in the bolts for the lift did surprise me abit. Rushed design? Nothing major. Saw cuts very well. Did get rid of generic blade and installed heavy duty combo from Portland Saw. Nice blades made locally and brought out to you hot off the mill with loving hands. Life time supply of high grade carbide.

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              • #22
                Thanks for your notes, after much research I brought home my 3650 on the weekend. It's in the box in my hallway waiting for a neighbor to help me take it to my basement. Your tips are much appreciated. I have a couple of questions if you don't mind?
                1. What kind of paste do I want to buy for the table?
                2. Roughly how long does assembly take?
                Mike
                CanadaMike

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by CanadaMike:

                  1. What kind of paste do I want to buy for the table?
                  2. Roughly how long does assembly take?
                  Mike
                  Johnsons' Paste Wax is good for providing a slick surface for your wood to slide across but it's not the best for preventing rust. Boeshield T-9 gets high marks for rust prevention. Applying a coat of T-9 followed by a coat of Johnsons' Paste Wax should give you the best of both worlds. If you can't find Johnson's, MinWax makes a furniture paste wax that is every bit as good as Johnsons'. However, DO NOT use any kind of wax that has silicone in it.

                  Assembly time for your saw should be anywhere between 5-8 hours. Speed should not be a concern here though. The assembly process is an excellent opportunity to get to know your TS both inside and out. I found it very benifical after each step of the assembly process to reread the instructions again of what I had just done and double check my work before moving on to the next step.

                  One more thing, be very nice to that neighbor of yours because you'll need him again to help you set the saw on its feet when you have it assembled.
                  Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                  • #24
                    Just to add a note to RSHugger's comments--When the saw is upside down for assembly, put the four brackets in the bottom of the legs for the Herculift. It is a lot easier than laying on your belly to add them after the saw is right side up.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Thanks BadgerDave,
                      I have the saw assempbly started and picked up Minwax. I'm about to attach the wings and was thinking that very same thing, am I going to be able to lift this off my bench and flip it over? Not likely! When the time comes I'll lure my neighbor over with beer.
                      Thanks for your note,
                      Mike
                      CanadaMike

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                      • #26
                        Beeeeeeeer! Nothing goes better with a Molsons' than some Wisconsin cheese and a bratwurst. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I just finished assembling my TS3650 and have a few suggestions to add to the excellent ones already posted.

                          Instead of installing the table extensions with the saw upside down on the floor, I waited until I had it upright. Clamp a 2x4 across the bottom of the rear of the table, rest the rear of each extension on the 2x4 as you insert and finger tighten the bolts. The 2x4 holds the extensions in vertical alignment. Snug the bolts down and then use a deadblow hammer to nudge them into perfect alignment with the main table, then tighten firmly. With this method, you don't need the c-clamps either.

                          I used a piece of ground stock clamped across the table and extension to align the wings and table, but found that just sliding my finger tips across the joint as I gently tapped the wing into alignment worked just as well. The right wing needed a small shim to make it flat with the table.

                          Also, when you check the squareness of the blade to the miter slot even if it is perfect check the tightness of the trunnion bolts. Mine were loose.

                          I am a mechanical engineer and pay a lot of attention to design and construction. I am very impressed with the 3650. The assembly went together without a hitch except for the strange mix of metric and SAE bolts and nuts. The Herc-U-Lift is a bit of a puzzle, but once assembled and installed is the best mobile base I have seen. No problem with the arbor either.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            HAve you considered Bostick Topcote


                            Once you clean the oil from the table top and the extensions get some good paste wax on them. With in a matter of 3 days I started to get minor surface rust just from the oil from my fingers/hands. This cleaned up with just a little Mothers metal polish.
                            \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                            • #29
                              I have taken a careful look at the flexing issue and it comes at the top of the legs where it meets the frame of the upper part of the saw. You can see a gap come an go as you flex it. If you look at the design there are 2 bolts on each corner BUT there is a separation between the 2. if there was a solid connector between the 2 bolts such as what you find down at the bottom where it meets the Lift that may stop the flex.

                              You can put the saw upright with the wings on by this method that I use. (I have to be careful because anytime I lift anything too heavy I pay the price in a certain vital area.) The method is to lift one corner and place it on something that is about 10-12 inches off the ground. Then lift the other corner and place on something about the same height. Then because you have it evenly about a foot off the ground (of course the other 2 corners are still on the ground) you can lift the rest of the way.
                              I love the saw and have added an Osborne EB3 gauge, a mulecab router table with a Freud sh5 fence for the router, a Veritas bit jack for the rotuer lift, and 2 legs underneath the far end where the router table is.
                              Gary

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