Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cross cut sled and dado cuts

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Cross cut sled and dado cuts

    I was reading a forum on whether to go with 6" or 8" dado blades and someone pointed out that if you want to use your dado blades with a cross cut sled, you'll lose some depth capability. I'm in a similar boat in that I am looking at Dado blades for my TS3650 (already read all the posts re: the arbor, etc) and also want to build a cross cut sled.

    My question is - if you use a cross cut sled with a dado blade, say 3/4", won't that cut a 3/4" slot in the cross cut sled? Therefore reducing the effectiveness of using the sled for normal, thinner kerf, cross cuts?

    I've got to be missing something here - can someone enlighten me?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    Yes, if you want to maintain zero clearance you would have to make a separate sled for the dado.

    Comment


    • #3
      Lou, I read the thread you mentioned and saw the reference to using a cross cut sled for a dado, however, I have never seen such an application in actual use. Not that it is not possible, but certainly any blade change will impact the sled. Say, for example, if you use a thin kerf blade and a regular kerf blade - if you want the sled to be "zero clearance" - you would need two sleds. For my applications, I don't see the big difference and use just one sled for both type blades, but never with a dado blade.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have not used a dado with a cross cut sled, so I may be way off base here, but if your sled runs on the left side of the blade (talking about the TS3650 here), then how would a dado be aby different? All the chippers and the outer right-hand cutter all stack to the right of the left cutter, which is in the same position with respect to the arbor as any other blade. If the sled is to the left of the arbor, the additional chippers and cutter will not come in contact with the sled. Am I right or wrong?

        Comment


        • #5
          Hi Guys,

          A cross cut sled is just a jig/fixture to help with cross cutting operations. When it comes to this operation it is a "one size fits all" application.

          They can be made out of scrap quickly or can be more sophisticated based on your hearts desire.

          I believe cross cut sleds are best for dado cuts to keep an even, steady base to secure the work peace resulting in (hopefully) a cleaner cut when compared to a cut made without the use of a sled.

          A "Zero Clearance Sled" should not be the primary goal of a cross cut sled. A dado in a work peace that is so small that it may slip between the stacked dado blade and the cross cut sled would indicate that a different cut process may be needed. I.E. First make dado (in larger piece) then cut to length.

          [ 02-24-2005, 08:35 AM: Message edited by: Desmo888 ]

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Bob D.:
            I have not used a dado with a cross cut sled, so I may be way off base here, but if your sled runs on the left side of the blade (talking about the TS3650 here), then how would a dado be aby different? All the chippers and the outer right-hand cutter all stack to the right of the left cutter, which is in the same position with respect to the arbor as any other blade. If the sled is to the left of the arbor, the additional chippers and cutter will not come in contact with the sled. Am I right or wrong?
            Bob, most of the sled designs that Ive seen utilize both miter slots as runner tracks. This enables the work piece to be supported on both sides of the cut.

            The biggest problem I see with using a ZCI sled to make dado cuts would be that a person would need a seperate sled for every width of dado they cut. That would cause a big storage problem in my smallish shop.


            [ 02-24-2005, 09:37 AM: Message edited by: badgerdave ]
            I decided to change calling the bathroom the "John" and renamed it the "Jim". I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.

            Comment


            • #7
              My thought was the same as Badger Dave's Add to that that, with a wider slot, you're might have to make the sled beefier, which means more weight (a reason I don't bother with one in the first place). BD is also right in pointing out the nomenclature----I too understand a sled to run in both miter slots, as opposed to a panel cutter or the newer units with the movable fence for miters.

              I've never had a problem with a waxed table surface and my regular miter gauge, in cutting dados.

              First, as to 6" vs. 8" dado sets, about the only time it could be an issue is if you use a box jig on thick stock.
              Dave

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by daveferg:
                My thought was the same as Badger Dave's
                It's official, on 02/24/05 @ 9:56 AM, Hell froze over.
                I decided to change calling the bathroom the "John" and renamed it the "Jim". I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.

                Comment


                • #9
                  The last time that happened was 4-6 months ago when I had to admit that I agreed with the Ferg. We sure are gettin mellow in our old age, aren't we? [img]tongue.gif[/img]
                  Lorax
                  "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by badgerdave:
                    Bob, most of the sled designs that Ive seen utilize both miter slots as runner tracks. This enables the work piece to be supported on both sides of the cut.
                    The biggest problem I see with using a ZCI sled to make dado cuts would be that a person would need a seperate sled for every width of dado they cut. That would cause a big storage problem in my smallish shop.
                    Agree that most use both miter slots. Since a dado is not a through cut, would zero-clearance be that important? I would think that having the work supported (held square) on both sides of the cut would be a big advantage. IMHO [img]tongue.gif[/img]
                    Lorax
                    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      BadgerDave said: "Bob, most of the sled designs that Ive seen utilize both miter slots as runner tracks. This enables the work piece to be supported on both sides of the cut. "

                      You are correct Dave, I was thinking of a panel cutter and not a sled with double runners for both miter slots.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        You have 2 options

                        Have 2 sleds - one for Zero clearance - one for dados

                        - OR -

                        I've seen folks make inserts in their crosscut sleds. An insert for dado's - and an insert for Zero Clearance.

                        Both approaches work equally well.

                        Jake

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Badger and Lorax-----they're serving iced tea down below.

                          You can get tear out on dados, particluarly on plywood---many dados now have a scoring tooth or such, but when going cross grain, where it will show, I generally score it with a utility knife first.

                          Don't know about you guys, but between the lack of uniformity in plywood thicknesses and switching to 1/4" for drawer bottoms and maybe 1/2" for rabits, frankly I'd go nuts with all the inserts.
                          Dave

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ok, several days ago I said I had never seen a cross cut sled used for dados - and, of course, that was true. However, I just picked up the April issue of Fine Woodworking and it has some good articles on dado sets and one shows a cross cut sled in use. Sooo, mark the day - I have again learned something. Cool.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X