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  • Boring precision depth holes



    I am working on a project that is 20" X 28", has a grid marked out for drilling 106 holes, 15/16" by 5/32" deep. With my DP, I'll be able to reach about 52 of them leaving 54 that have to be drilled in a different matter. Here's where I need some insight and input. What or how would be the best approach in be able to maintain the precision depth and plumb of the remaining 54?

    I've only come across one Plunge Drill made by Triton with no luck, as of now, as to where one could be purchased. I also came across a portable drill guide (Portable Drill Guide - Rockler Woodworking Tools) but unsure as to the stability of it.

    I'm hoping that someone else has had a situation where you wanted to maintain precision bores on stock to large for the DP and developed or learned a trick to achieve this task.


    Ron



  • #2
    Re: Boring precision depth holes

    my first thought would be a drill block guide, a steel block thick enough to guide the bit straight, (if want to put a drill bushing) a very hard bushing that is used to guide bits), that one can line up on the area, and put a shaft collar on the bit fro depth guide, and use a hand drill, Drill Bushings, Liners & Hardware - Drill Bit Accessories | MSCDirect.com

    if you use the drill bushing one could probably make the guide out of ply wood or similar,
    depending on your gird lay out, one may be able to add some pins, and make it self adjusting and laying out,
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
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    • #3
      Re: Boring precision depth holes

      You don't say what the material is you are drilling in but I assume it is wood.

      If it were metal a Mag-drill would be the answer. It would work to drill in
      wood also but the price would be prohibitive, and you would not be able to
      secure the drill to the material by energizing the electro-magnet, but the mass
      of the drill itself might be enough to hold it steady, and if not you could use
      a piece of 1/4" plate that you temporarily clamped to the piece being drilled,
      then position the mag-drill as need on the plate.

      Hougen Portable Mag Drills

      Magnetic Drilling Equipment


      If you use the guide bushing in a piece of wood as BHD talks about, use a
      centering punch the same size as your bit to line up on your pre-punched
      center marks, then clamp the guide block with bushing so it can't move and
      drill your hole(s). I might pay to make the guide block so you can drill more
      than one hole per setup...ie, multiple guide bushings in one block, and have
      alignment holes as in a shelf pin jig to ensure you maintain equal spacing.
      Last edited by Bob D.; 11-25-2011, 08:17 AM.
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      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Boring precision depth holes

        I must be missing something here. You say the project is 20"x28" and you can only reach about half of the holes that need to be drilled on your drill press. I have a small bench top drill press that could reach all the holes with no problem. All I would have to do is drill half of them turn the work 180 degrees and drill the other half.
        SSG, U.S. Army
        Retired
        K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Boring precision depth holes

          Originally posted by TOD View Post
          I must be missing something here. You say the project is 20"x28" and you can only reach about half of the holes that need to be drilled on your drill press. I have a small bench top drill press that could reach all the holes with no problem. All I would have to do is drill half of them turn the work 180 degrees and drill the other half.
          Maybe I should of mentioned that the DP is a bench top with only a 5" throat. Now if, as you mention, you also have a small bench top model, enlighten me as to how you are able to reach 7", 8", 9", or 10" inside the work?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Boring precision depth holes

            I own this one.
            Ryobi DP102L 10 in. Drill Press

            DP102L 10 in. Drill Press-DP102L at The Home Depot
            SSG, U.S. Army
            Retired
            K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Boring precision depth holes

              Originally posted by TOD View Post
              I own this one.
              Ryobi DP102L 10 in. Drill Press

              DP102L 10 in. Drill Press-DP102L at The Home Depot
              OK....much the same as I have. I challenge you to lay out a 20" X 28" piece of cardboard and have 10 rows of 15/16" holes both up and down, and across for a total of 100 holes, Now get your camera out and post a picture of how you were able to reach the inner spots to be drilled. It's been awhile since I've learned a revolutionary new way to do something, but I'm always game.


              Ron


              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Boring precision depth holes

                I just went out and measured. I was thinking 10" drill press 10" throat. I stand corrected. I would only be able do do half like you. Are you doing this in plywood or did you glue up some boards to get to 20x28? If you are glueing up some boards can you glue them up after you have drilled the holes?
                SSG, U.S. Army
                Retired
                K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Boring precision depth holes

                  Personally, I just forget about the your small benchtop drill press and use a "drill-guide" similar to the one you referred to at Rockler. That particular one is a bit on the expensive side though. Craftsman has a similar one for much less and I've even seen them in Home Depot, IIRC.

                  While I do have a Ridgid 1550 drill press which I purchased in 2003, there were many years where somewhat precise drilling was necessary and I've had a "Portalign" drill-guide which I purchased back in the 70's. A few years ago, I also purchased the Craftsman model which offer significant design enhancements over that original "Portalign" model.

                  Presuming that your holes are probably in line with each other (possibly on both axis), I think I would use a "straight board" (similar to a "factory edge" that you might use when circular saw ripping sheet stock) as an edge guide to rest the drill guide base against. With a 15/16th diameter hole, you're going to have some torque issues and I presume your drill will handle that okay... but there might be a tendency for the drill-guide base to move on you, so after a couple of practice bores, you might want to determine whether it's necessary to clamp the drill guide in place each and every time. (That would add considerably to your time, but it would negate any gouging or "jumps" that might ensue otherwise.)

                  Also, with a drill-bit of that size (are you using a Forstner bit?) you may want to see if the drill-guide shaft is round or "hexed"... obviously the latter alleviates any chance of slippage in your drill's chuck.

                  I should point out that the "drill guide" has a very positive, adjustable "stop" which can be secured on one of the two guide rods. This provides the advantages of "drill press" operation. I've used my two drill guides with great satisfaction as it allows me to make exactly "perpendicular" holes and also control the depth as precise as anything... and definitely better than a piece of tape or a drill-bit stop collar. Might well be just me, but the latter always has a tendency to slip or come loose, especially if you actually bottom the collar.

                  I hope this helps,

                  CWS

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Boring precision depth holes

                    You could possibly make a template of maybe 2 or 3 rows of the holes and use a router with a bushing. You would have a very positive depth stop and flat bottom holes.
                    SSG, U.S. Army
                    Retired
                    K.I.S.S., R.T.F.M.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Boring precision depth holes

                      Originally posted by CWSmith View Post
                      Personally, I just forget about the your small benchtop drill press and use a "drill-guide" similar to the one you referred to at Rockler. That particular one is a bit on the expensive side though. Craftsman has a similar one for much less and I've even seen them in Home Depot, IIRC.

                      While I do have a Ridgid 1550 drill press which I purchased in 2003, there were many years where somewhat precise drilling was necessary and I've had a "Portalign" drill-guide which I purchased back in the 70's. A few years ago, I also purchased the Craftsman model which offer significant design enhancements over that original "Portalign" model.

                      Presuming that your holes are probably in line with each other (possibly on both axis), I think I would use a "straight board" (similar to a "factory edge" that you might use when circular saw ripping sheet stock) as an edge guide to rest the drill guide base against. With a 15/16th diameter hole, you're going to have some torque issues and I presume your drill will handle that okay... but there might be a tendency for the drill-guide base to move on you, so after a couple of practice bores, you might want to determine whether it's necessary to clamp the drill guide in place each and every time. (That would add considerably to your time, but it would negate any gouging or "jumps" that might ensue otherwise.)

                      Also, with a drill-bit of that size (are you using a Forstner bit?) you may want to see if the drill-guide shaft is round or "hexed"... obviously the latter alleviates any chance of slippage in your drill's chuck.

                      I should point out that the "drill guide" has a very positive, adjustable "stop" which can be secured on one of the two guide rods. This provides the advantages of "drill press" operation. I've used my two drill guides with great satisfaction as it allows me to make exactly "perpendicular" holes and also control the depth as precise as anything... and definitely better than a piece of tape or a drill-bit stop collar. Might well be just me, but the latter always has a tendency to slip or come loose, especially if you actually bottom the collar.

                      I hope this helps,

                      CWS
                      Thank you, CWS. You have helped very much with your understanding of the task. I will further try to research other Drill Guides, besides the one I already found, and will probably go that route.

                      This seems to be the path that I will be choosing, but still open to other suggestions, if there are any.

                      Thanks to all again.

                      Ron


                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Boring precision depth holes

                        are you making a "quarter" display?

                        check out this place, http://www.ptreeusa.com/forstner_bit_sets.htm they have a special stop for Forstner Bits.

                        this may be the same unit,
                        http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=2406

                        http://www.amazon.com/WoodRiver-Fors.../dp/B0039ZB174

                        http://www.google.com/search?q=Forst...w=1152&bih=705
                        Last edited by BHD; 11-25-2011, 02:36 PM.
                        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                        attributed to Samuel Johnson
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Boring precision depth holes


                          Thank you, BHD. And yes, a Quarter Display. Your links show a lot of promise, well worth considering.

                          Ron


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Boring precision depth holes

                            A plunge router may also be an option, with a spiral up cutting bit sized to the dimesion you wish. You can easily set the depth on the router, and the holes should be no problem for even a small (2.5HP) router. Set up a fence for the baseplate with a jointed peice of scrap and you should be good to go.

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