Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

OH-MY..So many planes!

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OH-MY..So many planes!

    I have an old Stanley block plane. I have finally started to use it more often
    when doing various projects.

    I have received a catalog with a myriad of planes....
    The shoulder plane, bull nose plane, and 3-in-1 shoulder plane have upped
    my interest in adding another plane to my tool collection.

    I even looked at some rabbet planes to help clean up dadoes etc... but
    I know plywood has become skinnier over the past few years...so I'm not sure
    how necessary they may be. I also just purchased a better quality stacked dado
    blade set for my table saw and it does cut smooth even dadoes.

    So....without breaking the bank and if possible purchasing "made in USA"
    which of the above planes would be a useful purchase?

    I do have power planers and other power tools so the purchase of bench planes
    right now is not a priority

    I have looked at Stanley and Veritas planes..some of the other high end brands
    are beyond my pocketbook. I'd like to stay under $125.00
    I also looked at the "made in India knock-offs" offered at Garrett-Wade
    E-bay right now does not excite me with what's available.

    Your input is appreciated.


    Cactus Man

  • #2
    Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

    I thought you were talkin' about Sky Harbor.

    I prefer to buy used, Stanley and clean 'em up. As all planes need tuned-up any way. The jack and jointer are the most used. I would also like the rabbit plane for cleaning up dados.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

      I use a router plane a lot for making sure the dados bottoms are flat, and uniform, some times working by ones self it is easy to let some thing not to be keep perfectly flat, on the table,

      I like the scrapers, hand held and I have a scraper plane as well,

      some times I would like to play with some molding planes,

      I used some micro planes and a thumb plane when making a violin for my DD, that was a fun project, she learned to ply it and still plays it and it sounds better than many,
      Attached Files
      Last edited by BHD; 11-25-2011, 01:57 PM.
      Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
      attributed to Samuel Johnson
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

        The Veritas medium shoulder plane is really nice for cleaning up dado's and exceptional for cleaning up tenon shoulders but is not under your budget.
        If you use you stanly block now I would suggest investing in a new blade for it to see what it can really do.
        The new blade are thicker and better steel for edge holding.
        Stanley/Record Plane Blades made by Veritas® - Lee Valley Tools

        If you want to take your finishing to the next level you may want to invest in a #4 smoother and a set of scrapers

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

          It doesn't take much to get hooked on planes. I like to pick up used planes in decent condition and get them
          back in working condition. Most of the planes I have were bought used at flea markets and a couple off eBay.

          Some I bought new many years ago. I have a few more that I never use, mostly molding planes some of
          which were sold together with one of the #5 Stanleys I bought, so I got them by default not really having any
          use for them.

          The router plane in the back on the top shelf I made. Works fairly well and would probably benefit from a better
          iron in place of the one I made from a 5/16" Allen wrench.

          Click image for larger version

Name:	7d632ec1023c3833ffcdd3b4e2b0e941.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	93.8 KB
ID:	15728

          All three of the #5 Jacks I have I think I paid less than $30 each for. One I got for $12 I remember and it wasn't in too bad of shape. It's nice to have more than one. This lets me leave one set for heavier work.

          So for far less than what you are looking at in the $100 to $125 range you can build a collection of planes. Now specialty planes will run more but they can be found used for reasonable prices, just don't buy museum pieces, get good condition worker tools.

          You might want to subscribe to Pat Leach's tool list. He deals mostly in planes but has some other old tools. Some are rare and expensive, others are good worker tools and he has photos of all for you to inspect.

          Go to www.supertool.com and check him out. He knows more about Stanley planes than anyone you'll bump into I'm sure. Be sure to check out his Blood and Gore site for info on old Stanley planes. Spend an hour or so looking through that site and you'll have a good idea what you are looking at when you go to buy a used plane. You'll learn how to spot a plane that has been clobbered together from parts and what makes one model better than another.
          Last edited by Bob D.; 11-27-2011, 04:10 PM.
          ---------------
          Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
          ---------------
          “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
          ---------
          "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
          ---------
          sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

            I found a 3-in-1 shoulder plane for under $60.00 on Amazon
            so I get three styles out of one tool a chisel plane, a bull nose plane, and a shoulder plane.
            Sadly I doubt it's made in USA I think India or Taiwan

            I am fully aware it will require some sharpening and adjusting out of the box..not an issue

            The real big boy made in USA planes are simply beyond my wallet
            I have not had surplus money in over three years now!
            I was informed last week my 401K has been downsized to a 101K

            thanks for all your input

            Cactus Man

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

              Other than my block planes, I use my Lie-Nielsen medium shoulder plane the most. I had to delay the purchase for a while to afford it, but am glad that I did. Almost all of my furniture projects have mortise and tenon joinery and I like to cut my tenons a bit large and perfect the fit with the plane. I always get a huge sense of satisfaction having a joint fit perfectly.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

                Hand Plane Restoration PAGE 1


                I thought this was a pretty neat overhaul overview.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

                  If you can't afford a Lie Nielsen or Veritas caliber plane, I much prefer buying a good older plane to the inexpensive imports. Here are some tips and observations to buying older planes.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

                    It kind of depends on where you are going with this.

                    If you are wanting to start getting familiar with hand planes and using them more, then your best bet would be a pre-WWII Stanley Jack Plane (#5). It is the multi-purpose bench plane, and beings they were made by the thousands, are fairly cheap on the internet and at tool collector meetings. If it is reasonably good condition, it will take no more work to "fettle" (tune up) than any of the India/Czech Stanley knock-offs currently on the market, and will cost about half what they do.

                    If you are looking to augment your power tools, then a shoulder plane or router plane will give you capabilities above what the power tools will do.

                    A shoulder plane will allow you to flatten the bootom of rabbets and, depending on its width, dadoes. You have to clamp a fence block to it to get a constant depth. It really excels at fine tuning tenons, both the cheeks and the shoulders, where you can take off a thousandth at a time for the perfect fit.

                    A router plane can also clean up the rabbets, dadoes, hinge insets and ensure they are a constant depth. Where it excels is doing inlays. With a pointed iron, you can do designs that are impossible with a power router, and you can work slowly instead of screwing up at the speed of light that a power tool can do.

                    The best ones are made by Lee Valley and Lie-Nielsen. Both are spendy, with Lee Valley having the edge when it comes to variety and cost of the irons. Old Stanleys are hard to find and not really cheap either. There are several sites where you can find designs that you make the most of it yourself, having only to buy the irons and some hardware.

                    Lee Valley Veritas planes are made in Canada. Lie-Nielsen's are made in Maine, USA.

                    As you said, there are many choices, so see what will give you what you are looking for: a gateway into hand plane use, or a capability that you don't now have.

                    JMTCW

                    Go
                    Practicing at practical wood working

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

                      I did have another thought on a hand tool to augment your power tools:

                      If you do not have card scrapers, I would recommend that those would be your first purchase. A pack of different shapes is cheap (around $20), and you can either buy or make a burnishing tool to turn a hook on the edge.

                      A card scraper can make quick work out of leveling a glue-up edge, scraping glue squeeze-out, easing the sharp corner on a square edge, and replace 90% of your sand paper use.

                      The one hand tool I use on virtually every furniture project, whether made with hand tools or power tools.

                      Inexpensive, easy to sharpen, easy to use.

                      Go
                      Practicing at practical wood working

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

                        Originally posted by Gofor View Post
                        I did have another thought on a hand tool to augment your power tools:

                        If you do not have card scrapers, I would recommend that those would be your first purchase. A pack of different shapes is cheap (around $20), and you can either buy or make a burnishing tool to turn a hook on the edge.

                        A card scraper can make quick work out of leveling a glue-up edge, scraping glue squeeze-out, easing the sharp corner on a square edge, and replace 90% of your sand paper use.

                        The one hand tool I use on virtually every furniture project, whether made with hand tools or power tools.

                        Inexpensive, easy to sharpen, easy to use.

                        Go
                        I agree. I started using card scrappers to get into corners and soon discovered their versatility. I now just consider them a shop essential, like sand paper or a combination square.

                        One question... How do you make a burnishing tool?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

                          My 95 year old Dad let me go through his father's tool box a couple weeks ago. The tool box is over 100 years old as are many of the tools inside. I found a Stanley plane which he let me have. I have it in my shop but haven't had a chance to examine it in detail, but I don't think the blade can be salvaged, pretty dinged up. May have to get one of those replacements from Lee Valley, once I figure out what kind of plane it is; I know next to nothing about them.

                          Will be cool to be using a tool that he used so many years ago. I've had his old hand cranked grinding wheel that I used to play with in the basement when I was a little boy and he was stoking the furnace with coal. A nice memory.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

                            I made my burnishing tool from an exhaust valve stem from a diesel engine, and set it into a section of wood broom handle.

                            Key to a good burnishing tool is that it be smooth and hard. Screw driver shafts are not hard enough. You can also use a HSS drill bit. (1/4" would be a good diameter) Drill into a length of dowel or broom stick far enough to bury all the flutes, and then just epoxy it in.

                            Use a light oil (I rub the burnisher against the side of my nose) when rolling the edge.

                            HTHs

                            Go
                            Last edited by Gofor; 12-01-2011, 08:51 PM.
                            Practicing at practical wood working

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: OH-MY..So many planes!

                              IMO the standard drill bit is not that hard at the upper shank and would not be best suited for the task, probably work but not much better than a screw driver shank, (my judgment comes from the number of bits that have slipped in the chuck and been tore up, a milling cutter will not tear like a drill bit will,)

                              you engine valve is a good idea, I just bought a burnisher (the way I remember it it was not very much), (but then the company is no longer selling wood working equipment), looks like there more to day, and nicer,
                              Last edited by BHD; 12-02-2011, 01:06 PM.
                              Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                              "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                              attributed to Samuel Johnson
                              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                              PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X