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  • #16
    Well said Vigs. That's an excellent summary.

    Steve

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    • #17
      Sixth option, Vigs, is a mortise and tenon machine. Fastest of all options, probably primarily because they have inbuilt the ability to control both parts for fit. Downside is they are quite expensive relative to all the other options. Leigh's new FMT is likely the cheapest at eight hundred plus a plunge router. Others run in the couple and a half thousand range.

      Picture of FMT in action:



      Dimensioned pieces for a table, eight mortise and tenon joints, 13 1/2 minutes on a stopwatch. Fat guy running the thing is yours truly, never broke a sweat.

      Dave

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      • #18
        Wow, I'll be looking up this tool online, but only just to drool. I'd be willing to bet that very large furniture manufacturers probably have a 7th option for even more $$.

        P.S. that's a well-equipped shop you have. Also noticed that you're wearing both eye and ear protection, and no loose clothing. Norm would be proud. Lately in Wisconsin I'm wearing flannel shirts with a heavy coat. One of these days I'm gonna get caught in the jointer. OUCHH!

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        • #19
          Actually, that isn't my shop (it is my FMT). The other fellow in the picture owns the shop.

          The big equipment starts to go back the other way, one machine does the mortise and another does the tenon. Since they don't change setups like a custom woodworker does, it isn't as important to have a single machine do the work. Expensive is right, for sure, on those machines.

          Thanks for noticing the safety equipment. Remember that jointers are unusual in that they don't leave parts behind for reattachment, be careful.

          Dave

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          • #20
            Ooofff! I think I'll buy a good woodworkers apron and start rolling sleeves up. That last statement conjurs bad images. Better to have cold appendages than mangled ones.

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            • #21
              Just buy yourself a good set of forstner bits, which you will need any way, and try drilling your mortises with them. It works quick and easy for me. The bottoms are flat, and you have to square up four corners but it's not a big deal at all. If you're still not satisfied, then buy you a bench mounted mortiser, you haven't lost anything at all.


              Bruce

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