Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

Securing templates to pieces for routing

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Securing templates to pieces for routing

    Had a question about the best way of doing this. I'm making some stair nosing out of Jatoba part of which has a curved section. I've decided the best way to do this is by using templates and then routing the Jatoba with a router bit equipped with a bearing. I would rough cut the piece and then use a flush trim bit to get the shape correct and then using a bullnose bit to make the bullnose shape.

    I have three sections to do and I have made two out of the three templates. But I’m not sure how to secure the template to the piece being routed while routing. Any ideas?

  • #2
    Re: Securing templates to pieces for routing

    Double-faced tape or hot melt glue.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Securing templates to pieces for routing

      I use this Double-Sided Turning Tape - Lee Valley Tools

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Securing templates to pieces for routing

        If I am template rounting, I never rely on double sided tape or hot melt glue, though many people do so without trouble. I would screw the template into the back side of your project. If the project requies two good faces (or is too small for screws), make a dedicated sled or workpiece holder for your project (with hold downs or clamps). This only takes a few extra minutes, and greatly reduces your chance of injury. I'll snap a photo of a cope and stick arch top jig and post later to help.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Securing templates to pieces for routing

          IMHO, it pretty much depends on exactly what you are working on and the ability to position a template on the piece in question.

          For example, if it's a simple rounded corner on a larger sheet or piece, I'd make my "corner" template of a size that I could clamp it into position. If however, the actual finish work piece is rather small and there's no room to clamp, then I'd resort to screwing a small template into position. Generally, I'd try to have some kind of tail or tabs that reach out onto the finished piece that would allow the most secure holding and the least "marking" by the screws.

          As far as double-face (or adhesive transfer) tape, I'm somewhat questioning of it's ability to actually hold the template into a solid position as I operated the router. Would the "holding" power be enough to secure the template against the stress of the "bearing" and any vibration resulting from actual cutting?

          Hot glue (or any other adhesive) would have the same question for me, plus how would it effect the final finish of your project?

          Mind you, I haven't done a lot of this kind of thing; but enough to give me the stated concerns.

          CWS

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Securing templates to pieces for routing

            Thanks for the replies and the suggestions. I too had thought about some of these options and had concerns about the holding power. I had read about people using double sided tape. I have already made some straight pieces for the straight stairs (no templates required for those) and you have to hold the wood quite tighly since Jatoba is hard - it takes a lot of force from the router to cut into the wood.

            I will try and put up some photos to show the templates. I made one of them out of 1/2" leftover plywood. The others I will be making with 3/4" melamine board kindly given to me free by the local lumberyard as they have 4X8 sheets that come with bundles of plywood for protection.

            Since this will be installed on stairs screws are possible since the underside won't really be visible. I'm interested in the clamping suggestion - cannot quite visualize how that would work so a photo would be very useful.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Securing templates to pieces for routing

              Make a practice rout of your curved area for sure. depth of cut when transitioning from running with the grain to cross grain could be tricky. I have not done this in Jatoba myself it just strikes me as a critical step in the job. I too prefer to secure my templates with clamps or screws over double stick tape.
              ---------------
              Light is faster than sound. That's why some people seem really bright until you hear them speak.
              ---------------
              “If I had my life to live over again, I'd be a plumber.” - Albert Einstein
              ---------
              "Its a table saw.... Do you know where your fingers are?"
              ---------
              sigpic http://www.helmetstohardhats.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Securing templates to pieces for routing

                Often I simply strategically place pin nails to hold the piece to the template
                then when you separate them you never see the tiny holes!

                using double stick tape or hot glue may damage the wood or require a ton of
                additional sanding

                Cactus Man

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Securing templates to pieces for routing

                  Although it probably wouldn't have the holding power required for this project, I used to frequently use 3M spray adhesive (the ultra thinset stuff used for labels and decals) sprayed directly onto the template - not the workpiece. Holds good for light routing, bandsawing & jigsawing and there's not much cleanup involved afterwards.
                  "HONK if you've never seen a gun fired from a moving Harley"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Securing templates to pieces for routing

                    Sorry not had a chance to post any photos as I just bought a new computer and not yet installed the software for downloading images. One idea I had was to cut the piece somewhat longer and also screw in extension pieces to the template and use that to secure the work piece. Once the job has been done unscrew the extension pieces and cut the work piece to size thereby not damaging the work piece in any way.
                    With my limited knowledge of woodworking what I have observed with Jatoba is that being such a hardwood it has a tendency to split when nailed.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X