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  • Router Speed Controls

    Food for thought.
    I own 2 freud FT2000's, both mounted in tables. I regularly adjust speed. My arthritic old body is sometimes unwilling to let me get under them to adjust the speed easily. So I ordered the router speed control boxes. No where on the add did it say they would not work with a soft start router, but on the unit there was a sticker that did. So I tried it anyways and they don't work.
    I proceeded to purchase a regular on/off light switch with a slide dimmer right next to the switch. This too yielded in the same unfunctional maner as the speed control switch.
    After blowin nearly 100 bucks, arthritis wins and I'm under the tables to adjust speeds.

    So, if you have a soft start router, you won't be able to fix it up with a speed control of anykind. You'll have to use the variable speed control that comes on the router.
    Not sure about single speed, I'm assuming it wouldn't work.

    I NEED CLAMPS !!! Donations Accepted.

    [ 01-03-2003, 01:52 PM: Message edited by: UO_Woody ]
    John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

  • #2
    Sorry to hear about your arthritis problems. Not knowing if this would work with your specific condition, I have a suggestion: if you have your router mounted in a removable base plate, could you just lift the plate out to make it easier to adjust the speed? (I realize this may be as bad or worse than reaching under the table, but like I said I don't know enough about which hand/body movements cause you trouble)

    [ 01-03-2003, 12:43 PM: Message edited by: Stuart H ]

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    • #3
      Look at the bright side. The symptom of a speed controlled router that has been used with an external speed control is smoked electronics. Happily you didn't run it long enough for that to happen.

      If I recall correctly (and I may not), the speed control on the FT2000 is either a rheostat or a variable pot. You probably could remove it (not a replacement unless the resistance matches exactly) from the router and mount it on longer wires. But don't be surprised if it kills the 'lektronix, and I never wrote this.

      Dave

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      • #4
        Dave;

        I was wondering about that, because when I tried it the first time, no hum or nothing. Then the RAS gave a little crack at me accross the shop.
        Thing is too, every outlet in my shop, all 15 120v is on it's own circuit. So it had to feed back through the 200 amp panel and through another circuit.
        Needless to say, before I did anything else I ran to the RAS and cleared the top off and grabed a piece of scrap, plugged the key in and Xed my fingers. It fired...Thank the good lord.
        I'm no electrician or technician, but simple wiring is no big deal. I'm not messing with anything else unless I got a manual with detailed step by step instructions, haha.
        John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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        • #5
          According to Freud, the router has an electronic speed control. that said, the circuit board may require a full 120volts to operate properly. you may want to check the operation of the speed control to make sure you didn't damage it with a low power application.

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          • #6
            I have a speed control for by single speed PC at my router table. Works perfectly. Actually paid $10 for it from Harbor Freights.
            Steve

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            • #7
              Steve,

              More than likely your single speed PC isn't a soft start. Look on the side of the speed control, I have one from HF too. Little yellow sticker says it won't work with soft start routers. That's where the electronic control comes in and needs the full 120v to work.

              On another not, I have used both Frueds extensivly since then and they seam to perfectly fine. *looks to the sky, bless you*
              John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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              • #8
                It should be possible to completely bypass the internal speed control/ soft start circuits and use the more convenient external control.

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                • #9
                  Correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't it harmul to the router to put a speed control on a non-variable speed router?

                  Michael

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                  • #10
                    ba-doyn:
                    I built my first speed control about 25yr ago to use my 1/2" drill to drive screws. These are feedback controls that sense the load current to the motor, and as the load increases make more current available to maintain a constant speed.
                    Putting the device into the router housing makes it easier to package. The proper feedback control will work just as well externally as internally, therefore you can control not only a router, but also just about any tool driven by a universal motor.

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                    • #11
                      Great. I'm not an electrical engineer by any means so it's good to hear it won't hurt the router. I've been considering a purchase of one for my PC router.

                      Michael

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                      • #12
                        My PC is not a soft start. Otherwise, I probably would be still scratching my head.

                        Steve

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