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  • Cast Iron Scratches

    I noticed that many of the cast iron tabletop cleaners state that you should use an abrasive pad to clean off any rust from the top. I have also read several forum posts stating the same and to use a finish sander with an abrasive pad.

    My question is doesn't this scratch the cast iron and if so could that cause any problems? I have cleaned my new 3650 table and I have several dark areas on the tabletop, but no matter what solutions I try I am not able to remove them with a rag.

  • #2
    The "abrasive pad" of choice for me is one of those flat kitchen scouring pads that is made for use with teflon coated pans. The one I have is yellow in color. Using that type of pad in conjunction with a minimal amount of WD40 and my ROS makes quick work of removing rust from CI. I recently used this method to remove some rust spots from the base of my floor DP. The base didn't have any scratches on it when I was finished.
    I decided to change calling the bathroom the "John" and renamed it the "Jim". I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.

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    • #3
      Enco has scotch-Brite pads at pretty good prices, most are about $0.80 each for the 6x9 size.

      Check out their current sale at:

      http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INLMPI?P...1277&PMPAGE=62

      or, if you buy them by the pkg (20 pads), they are even less:

      http://www.use-enco.com/CGI/INPDFF?P...&PARTPG=INLMPI

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      • #4
        I'm not really trying to flame, but, did you buy a saw (tool) or a display item for your den? A tool, especially a tablesaw, will get many scratches(and dings and discolorations, etc) when used. I look at every scratch or mark on my saw table (and bandsaw table and router table and planer and jointer) with fond memories of the things I have made over the years. In specific answer to your question, no the scratches will not affect the use of the tool. Use it and make sawdust, furniture, and scratches and most of all, enjoy the process.

        gator

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        • #5
          My TS 2424 is often a workbench/assembly table---paint/finish spills, glue, and a bit of rust now and then---unheated shop.

          150 grit on the ROS and a coat of wax----good to go.
          Mac<P>Problems are opportunities in disguise

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          • #6
            no so much about the prob but

            hello,
            i just saw the postings here. i understand that he wants his ts looks good. i know that the saw will have scratches and i guess that is not his point. u do not understand people they say you shoul have them on you saw, so you remeber work you did. that just shows that they are not taken care of there tools and i do not wnat to know how there work look like. sorry but thats how i see it. my saw does have scratches but only little once and i can not tell what kind of work i did.
            you are right take care of your saw and tool and it is more fun to use them

            Comment


            • #7
              Removing CI stains

              Might want to try auto polishing compound with a wool bonnet on a drill sanding pad to remove stains. For tougher stuff, try rubbing compond. Light stuff can be removed with soft scrub and a "dobie" pad (that nylon coated sponge sitting by the kitchen sink).
              Remember to clean up all the residue and rewax 'cause it will take off any protectorant you have on it.
              Practicing at practical wood working

              Comment


              • #8
                Hi, I'm new to all this but I before I do something, purchase a power tool, up-keep of equipment, I do my homework. I have found that this site is great for doing just that. With the purchase of my first table saw, the TS 3650, about alittle less then a year ago I have purchase many books and subscribed to many woodworking magazines. As for caring for the top of your table saw or for that matter any power tool surface I use my ROS with 180 - 200 grit sandpaper. Then 00 steel wool over the entire surface followed by 0000 steel wool over the entire surface. Followed by 0000 steel wool with a good automotive paste wax to protect the surface. Let dry and buff with a clean soft towel. Not forgetting to do the miter slots or the front and back rails. After doing this a few times, not all at once though, you just about can make out your complection. It may sound like alot of work but look at what you paid for it and what in return you are getting out of it. I think the time spent on the up keep is well worth it.

                Doug

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                • #9
                  WoodWorker

                  Most automotive paste waxes contain silicone which can adhere to wood and cause problems(fisheyes) when you apply the finish to your wood. If the wax you're using has silicone in it, you might want to change your choice of wax to something like Johnsons Paste Wax or Minwax Furniture Wax.
                  I decided to change calling the bathroom the "John" and renamed it the "Jim". I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks for the tip BadgerDave, I'm looking into it right now and have sent an email to the manufacture. I will put a post here when I get a response.

                    Doug

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                    • #11
                      BadgerDave, FYI, Turtle Wax Platinum Series Ultra Gloss Paste Wax does contain silicone. I will have to change to something else like Johnsons Paste Wax or Minwax Furniture Wax. How about the DuPont Teflon spray?

                      Doug
                      Last edited by WoodWorker; 03-07-2006, 10:56 PM.

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                      • #12
                        After reading all this and some other information in magazines, I decided that upkeep on tools is a good thing!! The tools represent a significant investment for me, and are as important to me as a working car. I think the tools deserve the same amount of time from me in maintenance as the car, and more so if I use them more.

                        I just finished the cleaning and polishing of all of my cast iron table tools. They look great, the little scrubber pads did great (I'm the woman of the house, so I had to chastise myself for taking the cleaning pads from the kitchen without replacing them!). Then I waxed them all with Johnson's paste wax. This really makes a great difference!! They look good, but the benefit is really that wood slides easier over the surface. I like having my tools in good operating shape.

                        Thanks for the tips on this procedure!!!
                        I put it all back together better than before. There\'s lots of leftover parts.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Woodworker: Teflon is as bad as silicone as far as coatings. If it gets on your work, the finish will fisheye or won't stick.
                          Practicing at practical wood working

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for the reply Gofor, thought I would ask the question just incase someone, not me, else might use it on their CI tops. I will be purchasing some Johnson's Paste Wax in the morning for my table saw top. Anyone have any ideas on removing wax, Turtle wax or other automotive wax, from the CI top before applying the Johnson's Paste Wax?

                            Thanks

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Frank_ca
                              hello,
                              i just saw the postings here. i understand that he wants his ts looks good. i know that the saw will have scratches and i guess that is not his point. u do not understand people they say you shoul have them on you saw, so you remeber work you did. that just shows that they are not taken care of there tools and i do not wnat to know how there work look like. sorry but thats how i see it. my saw does have scratches but only little once and i can not tell what kind of work i did.
                              you are right take care of your saw and tool and it is more fun to use them
                              I don't think I said, nor was I implying, that you should not take care of your tools. I perform monthly maintenance on all my big equipment, including waxing the table tops and lubing the moving parts. But, that said, I have seen too many comments over the years on the forums I visit by people who 'obsess' over the tools. Paint scratches, that screw tip that jussssst peeped through and put a scratch on a table top, that time when I wasn't thinking and drilled through the workpiece and put a dimple in the top of my 2½" thick hard maple bench top (every piece cut and laminated by yours truly), the hunmdreds of feet of material fed through the router table causing minute scratches on the phenolic plate, the stain spills, and etc etc etc. There is no need to obsess over little shhhhtuff. Keep the equipment in good operating order and use it.

                              gator

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