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  • crosscut sled plans

    anyone know of any plans to make a quality crosscut sled for the ts3612?
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    This is the crosscut sled/sliding table I ended up with on my 3612. Started with the stock miter gauge and added the Incra fence. Changed the Stock Gauge for a low cost $50 Incra V27 Gauge. Added the sliding and fixed tables/sleds to the V27 assembly.

    You can spread this over time and cost. And stop at a time appropriate for yourself. This Combo Sled/Table/Gauge works out quite well, and so far has covered many different needs.

    I've e-mailed you the plans.



    David

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    • #3
      You might want to get a copy of this months' (Oct.) Wood Magazine. Has a sled and a number of other great designs---good issue for setting up shop----can't hold a candle to David's really nice design, but a must-see issue for the shop!
      Dave

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      • #4
        Mr Cutbuff, very nice work. I wonder if you would mind emailing me those plans? I already have the V27 and wold very much like to make something like myou have.

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        • #5
          Kelly Mehler's book "Mastering the Table Saw" has a plan in it, and so do other books on table saws. His video by the same title shows how to make one. Highland Hardware's, www.tools-for-woodworking.com mail-order catalog contains a plan and hardware one, but I could not find it at their website.
          A simple sled is cheap and fairly easy to make. All you need is a piece of stable material (1/2" baltic birch plywood or something similar) dimensioned to whatever size you want for your sled. A couple of boards crosscut to the width of your sled and about 4 1/2 to 5" wide. I used 3/4" popular for the back fence and 8/4" popular for the front fence. Both fences are going to be placed on their edges and you want them wide enough so your blade will never cut through them because they are all that connect the left and right sides of the sled. You will also need to cut a couple of runners to fit in the miter slots of your table saw. You can cut these yourself or buy some adjustable miter sliders, such as those Incra sells. Then all you need are some screws and a little paste wax. The only difficulty you might encounter is in squaring the front fence with the saw blade. The accurancy of the sled depends on this. The back fence doesn't have to be perfectly square, but the front does. Before you start make sure the blade is at 90 degrees AND the blade is parallel to the miter slots. The latter cannot be more than 2 or 3 thousands of an inch out of parallel or else your cuts will be inaccurate. I wasted a lot to time and money on plywood making my first sled because my blade was about 10 thousands of an inch out of parallel. It's surprising how much that little bit matters.

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          • #6
            I made a poor man's version similar to Cutbuff's out of plywood. Mine is also 2 parts, but the left side is just a piece of 3/4" ply that is about 16" wide and 30 inches long. It makes the 2 sides the same height and reduces tearout. The right side is 2' X 4' X 3/4" and rides in the right side miter slot.

            The fence is made from aluminum channel and faced with a piece of 3/4" oak and is about 4" high and 4' long. I have a T-track in the oak board with a stop block mounted in it. I have a measuring tape glued to the sled in front of the oak fence board.

            I don't have any pictures, but if anyone would like them, let me know and I'll take some and e-mail you a link.

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            • #7
              In my post above, the title I gave to Kelly Mehler's book is incorrect. The book is "The Table Saw Book' and the video is "Mastering the Table Saw."

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              • #8
                Just ordered Mehler's book, used, through Amazon, $9 ($12 after shipping). Is there an equally definitive single work on the router?

                Also, scored a returned WD1665 vac for $65 last night... missing the casters, and the HD tool guy went and ripped 'em off a display for me. Otherwise, a complete poor man's DC on wheels.

                After the 3612, the PC router clearance, the WD and the book, I am just saving too much money to quit buying stuff now... although Another Point of View has been expressed ...

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                • #9
                  Mark IV check out www.patwarner.com for everything and more on routers.

                  Great guy, and will even sign the books that you buy through his site.

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                  • #10
                    Mark IV,
                    I would suggest the Pat Warner website. I have his 2 videos and they are good, but short.
                    There are a couple of books by Pat Speilman (not sure about the spelling of the last name). I have his book titled The Router Handbook, and he has another book titled Router Magic. The Router Handbook is good, but I didn't find it as helpful on the Router as Kelly Mehler's book on the Table Saw. Mehler's book is great for someone like me that is fairly new to woodworking and had a problem with setup and concerns about safety.

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                    • #11
                      and he has another book titled Router Magic

                      Bill Hylton is the author of "Router Magic", not Patrick Spielman.

                      Dave

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                      • #12
                        I like "Woodworking with the Router" by Hylton and Matlack. Covers the subject from A to Z.

                        David

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                        • #13
                          Router Joinery by Gary Rogowski, published by Tauton press is another excellent router book. I and many others think Tauton is the literary expert on woodworking. The small investment in books and magazines can bring big savings to the ultimate cost of tools and projects, not too mention time saved and increased quality of work.

                          I've done all of my wookworking in a large, universtiy shop with every tool imaginable, but now that I'm preparing to set up my own shop, it's time to evaluate what I really need to complete projects on my list. I have read a half dozen books from Tauton plus 2 years worth of Fine Woodworking and am now confident that I will be building "Fine" furniture within a reasonable budget this winter. The knowledge I've gained through Tauton has been immeasurable, and I'm happy to say that this forum has helped with my ongoing table saw purchase decision.

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                          • #14
                            I was running through the net trying to decide on a new table saw when I ran into a man named Kelly Mehler in a nearby town. I called him to ask if he might Know of anyone who had a used table saw. He said he had a few he might consider selling since he was moving to a new shop and I should come for a look.He had a building full of woodworking gear that I can only dream of. He had a Ridgid 2424 that I ended up taking home with me. I had no idea who I was dealing with. I am so glad that I did not try to impress him with my vast knowledge of table saws in my struggle to get a better deal.The saw works fine. I got a good deal. I hope he feels the same.

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