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  • Lumber yards

    I buy 95% of my project lumber from the same lumber yard, and have been buying from them for years. Of course, they charge in BF (confusingly, sometimes called "board meters" in Canada, though it is still measured as 12 x 12 x 1, and has nothing to do with meters).

    Anyway, I went to purchase some walnut yesterday, which is expensive. I needed about 11 BF for a small project, so I went and dug through the stack for about 45 minutes. So I choose my rough cut boards and get them tallied. I bring my slip up to the cash, and the guy tells me I have 13 BF. I pay him, and go load my lumber.

    When I am finished loading, I double check the BF becasue it seems too little to be 13 BF. It actually measures 10.5 BF. I go back inside, and talk to the lumber guy who has no problem giving me another board to make up the difference.

    This got me thinking - how many times have I just paid and left, assuming the guy totaled the BF correctly? 2.5 Bf may not seem like a lot, but in walnut its over $15.00 in lumber.
    Last edited by franklin pug; 01-08-2012, 12:33 PM. Reason: spelling

  • #2
    Re: Lumber yards

    A board foot is 12" by 12" by 1" thick.

    It sounds like you're confused by this method of measure.

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    • #3
      Re: Lumber yards

      Originally posted by dlarrivee View Post
      A board foot is 12" by 12" by 1" thick.

      It sounds like you're confused by this method of measure.
      Nope, I'm very familiar with board feet and have been buying lumber that way for many years. Perhaps my post was confusing - I'll edit it a bit to clarify.
      Last edited by franklin pug; 01-08-2012, 12:34 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: Lumber yards

        you need adopt the NTA approach to all transactions. Never Trust Anyone. humans are flawed by nature, so i always check what i'm getting vs what i'm being charged. too easy to just "rely" on the other guy to get it right and if he doesn't, it winds up costing you. of course, the reverse is true. i correct overcredits on returns. returned an item to woodcraft purchased on sale and owner credited me with full retail. he was actually surprised someone would correct his $10 overcredit. it's just the right way to do things.
        there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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        • #5
          Re: Lumber yards

          It's fairly simple to figure out the BF of a piece of wood. All you do is multiply the thickness x the width x the lenght(all in inches) then divide the total by 144. Bring a tape measure and hand held calculator with you when you visit the lumber yard and you should have a very close idea of how many BF you have before you get to the cashier.
          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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          • #6
            Re: Lumber yards

            some times it is confused as it is to be rough, or saw mill cuts, not finish cuts, and I know some are thrown off not understanding that concept, (especially when it is finished lumber, as a Ix6 would be .75" x 5.5" inches but is figured at 1" thick and 6" wide, but even dried rough lumber will not be 1" or if it was cut at 6" wide will not dry to 6" wide, but closer to 7/8" thick and about 5.75" wide, (normally the width is figured to the inch, and length my be in feet and parts of a foot, such as 6 1/2 feet, If the ends are not split from drying,
            (I wish more places still used Board feet) easer to compare the price of different pieces, instead of this one is $4.00 a board and this one is $8.25, a board may still end up costing $XXX, but I think it helps the customer know what the lumber is costing, rather than trying to do a bunch of math in one head to figure if 4 of this size is the better price or 6 of this, when the project will be cut into smaller pieces,

            now days many of the people in the lumber business do not even know any thing about board feet, all they can tell you is what is in the computer read out. or the tag on the rack,

            Now I have never heard of board meters,
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