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cutting a perfect cube of wood

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  • cutting a perfect cube of wood

    How do you do cut a perfect cube of wood?

  • #2
    On the jointer of coarse
    John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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    • #3
      Tougher question is, how do you keep it that way? Since wood moves in an asymmetric fashion, the answer is unfortunately, you don't.

      Clues on what you're trying to achieve, in size if nothing else, would be helpful. There's a lot of differences between making a cube of 1 inch dimension, than of 1 foot dimension.

      Dave

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      • #4
        Dave,

        What do you mean by "...wood moves in an asymmetric fashion"?

        Best regards,

        Henry

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        • #5
          Sample board:

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          The lines are the grain. This board will change size across the grain, "up and down" in this picture much, much more than with the grain, "left to right".

          Wood moves so little along it's grain, that for standard furniture sized work it can be disregarded. Disregard across the grain movement, on the other hand, and the piece will pull itself apart.

          That's the simple part, because it is easy to express. There is also a difference between movement of the radial and tangential faces of wood. This is darned hard to explain without showing the end grain, and is not nearly as dramatic a difference (depending some on species) as the length/width difference.

          What it comes down to is that a "perfect" cube cut of wood will take different shapes as humidity changes. Sometimes it will be wider than long. Sometime looking at the end grain, is won't even be rectangular.

          Different species are better or worse. One of the best is "true" Mahogany. Even better is Mesquite, but finding pieces of any large size is difficult and very expensive.

          Dave

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