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  • Jointer technique getting better....

    And I owe it all to a suggestion i got on this very board. I feel bad that I do not remember who suggested it, but thank you. The problem I was having was getting comfortable running the face over the knives. Those small blocks are just silly. I took someone's advice and bought 2 tile grout floats. they are about 4" wide and 7 or 8" long. much more comfortable to work with, can keep better constant pressure. Some of you might recall I had some wood from a tree we had cut down (silver maple) milled and kiln dried. doesn't look like much rough, but i played with the jointer/planer combo over the weekend and I have to tell you, did a GREAT job, and wow what a grain pattern. Going to make for some nice projects this summer after my surgery.

    Again I apologize for not remembering who gave me the tip to buy the floats, but THANK YOU! HUGE difference.
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    The floats sound like a good idea. Keeping even pressure on a board is difficult when face jointing, especially if the board is twisted. It's very easy to rock the piece and just get a smaller version of a twisted board. So, mostly I try not to buy twisted stock. But, if I have to, I use the following steps when jointing twisted stock. 1) Use winding sticks to see exactly how bad the twist is. My winding sticks are maple, 14" long and 3/4" x 3/4" square and perfectly straight and square. On long stock, I make pencil marks on the side opposite the face to be jointed where the board sections are high. I then joint the high section, making sure not to rock the board (either side to side or end to end) while making the pass. I will only take about 1/32" per pass and it just takes time to get the faces flat. Another thing I've learned is to expect a finished board to be a lot thinner than the rough stock in badly twisted boards because of the high number of passes it takes to dimension the board flat.

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    • #3
      You know it was never an issue of dealing with severly twisted wood. I could just not get comfortable with face jointing anything with those small blocks it came with. i found myself either using my table saw push block, or (eesh) just my hands. I have no problem edge jointing with my hands, but face jointing made me nervous. It was just a matter of getting comfortable and getting the technique right. the grout floats solved that problem. I still have all my fingers and now have found a better tool for the job. The wood I had milled and dried even that is not too terribly twisted. yes there are some that are bad, but most of the boards are over 6" wide. i can rip them down and cut most of the twist out of most of em. others i can cut into two 6" wide boards perfect to face joint.

      Someday i will build that planer sled that was provided to me on this forum so i can keep the boards in their milled width. But I have no problem working with 6" wood, face and edge jointing, gluing giving me one flat and square surface, and then planing them as one instead of two for uniform thickness.

      I have not had a chance to play too much with the planer and probably wont this summer because of my upcoming surgery, but should be able to get some quality time early fall and again early spring next year. And I can't wait. I am amazed at how much more flexibility one gets by adding a thickness planer. I am glad that was my next choice. Cant wait to use it to it's full potential!
      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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      • #4
        Best wishes on your surgery, blue... You can convalesce by drawing plans and making design changes. Ask me how I know - LOL!!
        Later,
        Chiz
        Later,
        Chiz
        https://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/frown.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...es/redface.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...s/rolleyes.pnghttps://www.ridgidforum.com/core/ima...lies/smile.png

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        • #5
          Yeah

          lots of reading. Have a few books i have pulled out and dusted off. woodworking of course. Planning on reading cover to cover.

          Give me some time to go through the old shop notes and catalog them, as well as the old various wood working magazines and find all the things I wanted to "remember" LOL.

          Will only be laid up a few days though supposedly. Minimaly invasive surgery. Shorter recovery time. Don't get around much now either. somedays don't get out of bed. Others i am good as new.

          Herniated discs are no fun. Especially thoracic. Been to three surgeons before I found someone willing to touch it! Two thoracic and one cervical.
          \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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          • #6
            I agree that the grout floats are alot more substantial and effective that the stock push pads that are offered....they've got alot more surface area.

            Good luck with your surgery "Blue". Your post made me chuckle b/c it reminded me of a guy on Woodnet who had knee surgery. He got so bored that he ordered a Unisaw, DJ20 and new drill press from the internet during his recovery. Let us know if you go stir crazy and start re-equipping your shop!

            [ 05-23-2005, 08:05 AM: Message edited by: hewood ]

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            • #7
              Hewood

              well yes and no. I am concentrating on hand tools and sharpening gear. The next big purchase i make (before my drill press), is the bench dog router table that replaces the cast iron wing on the table saw. Time to get the most out of my router.

              Right now, I have puchased a bunch of arkansas stones and am experimenting with different stones and different techniques, meanwhile trolling ebay for a few specific items.

              I have also gotten a supplier for arkansas stones and have the ability to cut them down some. So I am making some specific application projects, and going to be selling some items on ebay in the coming weeks.

              Also working on an improvement to a jointer set up/maint accessory that i think will be a hit.

              Grizzly has a NICE wall mount (or top mount) tool box I have my eye on, caters to the woodworker. Don't have my catalog handy but it has two doors that open and 2 sliding pegboard panels on each side that slide out, exposing another pegboard type panel on the back for storage, awesome box for woodworking. Better than the pegboard I currently have set up, it is a reach across the workbench and spread out.

              I have lots of ideas, but first things first....LOL
              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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