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  • TS3650 motor

    I have the 3650 and rewired it to 220/240v and it runs cooler and has better startup and power. I did still have some vibration . I noticed that the cooling fan was rotating off axis. I removed the end cover and found th set screw was sticking out of the ring about 3/8" and the fan was bent. Further looking, the set "bolt" was the same or longer on the start up clutch behind the fan. Both fasteners were in the same oreintation as to create an off balance.I shortened the fan screw to be flush and used a caliper to get the fan straight. I also replaced the clutch bolt with a setscrew that was also flush. It is now very balanced. This was not a good design but easily modified.

  • #2
    Andrew----I have to hope that the manufacturers will listen to what you pointed out. I have to ask if it was really necessary to switch from Emerson motors on these saws. Not everyone has your skills, nor should you have to repair a new motor.
    Dave

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    • #3
      Geeessssh! Where are they getting their motors? Harbor Freight?
      Dave

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      • #4
        and rewired it to 220/240v and it runs cooler

        Could you post a temperature rise curve between the 120 and 240 volt installations? This could win me a bet...

        Dave

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        • #5
          I think that it is known that all motors run better on 220/240v. You also have 1/2 the amp draw on the wires. The motor was not at all hot after several hours of use. The motor was not as hot to the touch,after I rewired it.My "unisaw neighbor" was very impressed because he had to use my saw because his was burried in his garage. I used it to cut 2x4 and it did not slow the motor much. The sears/emerson I had would have stalled at the feed rate I was using.

          [ 11-29-2003, 10:30 AM: Message edited by: Andrew Benedetto ]

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          • #6
            The motor is the week point on this saw.

            I just used my saw for a few cuts after assembling it and it was hot as hell.

            Checked the power supply with a different T saw and that one ran well. I opened the wiring cover to check the connections as it started to drag and labor on start up.

            I was disgusted to find wire nuts used to make the connections. Everybody knows that vibration and wire nuts are not good friends.

            Anyway I have to return this saw as the motor is not working properly and it trips breakers in my shop. The rest of the saw looks like it will last for years.

            Pity that every thing ells on this saw works so well when the only locally manufactured item on it, is its week point.
            No Bull Dust Just Saw Dust

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            • #7
              The motor is the week point on this saw.

              I just used my saw for a few cuts after assembling it and it was hot as hell.

              Checked the power supply with a different T saw and that one ran well. I opened the wiring cover to check the connections as it started to drag and labor on start up.

              I was disgusted to find wire nuts used to make the connections. Everybody knows that vibration and wire nuts are not good friends.

              Anyway I have to return this saw as the motor is not working properly and it trips breakers in my shop. The rest of the saw looks like it will last for years.

              Pity that every thing ells on this saw works so well when the only locally manufactured item on it, is its week point.
              No Bull Dust Just Saw Dust

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              • #8
                The start up problem may be that the clutch is not placed against the contact springplate to allow the startwindings to work . Take the end cover off and remove the fan and loosen the set screw and slide the clutch inward. If you slide the clutch in and out on the shaft you will hear the contact open and close. The clutch must be against the contact springplate at startup and release after the start. I replaced the set screws(to be flush), straightened the fan, and rewired the motor to 220v and have instant start up,little vibration, and good power. I used the saw for several hours and the motor was not hot. I also do not like the wire nuts and may change them to a better connection later.

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                • #9
                  No Bull _ Your connections were made with wire nuts?? I really hope you pulling my chain here
                  Thought I had looked at mine before and no nuts. Looked again just now. No nuts!
                  Did you have a freak saw
                  Anyone else - what are yours?
                  Sounds to me like they almost had run of odd units and then got it right.
                  Leg flex ---- what leg flex? The same lil' thing that I experienced on Bridgewood? Non-factor.
                  Wire-nots....weird
                  Wish I had the answers ..... even half of \'em

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                  • #10
                    My 3650 has wire nut in the connection box too.

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                    • #11
                      For the record the old dud motor on the saw turns out to be made in Taiwan. The replacement motor is from Good old USA.
                      No Bull Dust Just Saw Dust

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                      • #12
                        No Bull, was this a TEFC motor like the 3650 has or the motor off the 3612?

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                        • #13
                          GreyGhost--yep, they there. Got "snoopy" and they there on my Grizz jointer, my Delta Drum Sander and likely on everything.
                          Everything on each unit looked nice and tight, added a lil' electrical tape just to ensure they stayed put and guess it seems no big deal. Unless I am pulling like hell on them or the earthquake on 10 scale comes a shakin' I'll never pay heed again.
                          Helped my son do some renovation on a Jeep he's redoing and they there too, factory or later added? Considering what that things been thru - can't see 'em every coming apart on my "toys".
                          Everyone get "full-up" on BIRDIE???
                          Wish I had the answers ..... even half of \'em

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                          • #14
                            As posted, wire nuts are fine for use in motors. If you look at any commercial application, you'll see wire nuts in nearly every motor. What you'll also see though is that teh wires and nuts are protected with what they call "friction tape" Sort of like thick rubber electrical tape that sticks to itself really good and cannot be unwrapped once put on. Must cut off if need be.

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                            • #15
                              HD has electrical self-fusing rubber tape that is good. I also use it to wrap tools handles for rubber grips. It can not be unwrapped without cutting once fused.

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