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  • Good Saw Blades

    I have had my TS2412 for about 2 months now. Since then I have tried a few different blades. I have only been truley impressed with the blade that came with my saw. Since it is a 24 tooth blade, it produces straight cuts quickly, but I need a blade that produces a more "finshed" cut. I tried a 60 tooth blade ("B&D Pirahna") which was ok, but still not quite what I expected. I then tried an Oldham 40 tooth blade and it was not very smooth and feeding the stock felt slower than with the 60 tooth blade. It felt like the blade was dull but it wasn't. Suspecting something was wrong, I measured the runout and it was excessive which would explain the dull feeling, so I took it back and while I was there I exchanged it for a Freud Diablo 40 tooth. It cost twice as much as the Oldham, but I'm learning through all of you that you do get what you pay for. I changed out the 24 tooth for the new blade as soon as I got home and started milling some old pieces of 2x4 and I must say that the edges are so nice you could probably join them without using a joiner/planer. The blade produced NO tearout on the crosscuts even without a zero clearance insert. I shaved some material off of all 4 sides and ended up with four very square and very tight edges. The corners of these edges are very sharp and the end grain is very smooth. I am wondering if anyone that has a 3612 and has the Ridgid 40 tooth blade has similar results. I really would like to know what blades everyone else uses without spending a fortune. I think that $50.00 is about the very most that I would spend on a blade that wasn't specialized. (i.e. Dado cutter, etc...). I am happy with the blade that I have now, but this is for future reference.

  • #2
    Fifty bucks leaves all my blades in the "too expensive" category.

    Philosophical conversation mode on. Why cheap out on blades? No matter how good a saw you have, no matter how much work you put into aligning it just right, no matter anything, what is the one single item that most directly affects the cut quality? The item that actually does the cutting, the blade.

    Philosophical conversation mode off, cheap guy mode on. More expensive blades last much, much longer than cheap ones. You may well buy three hundred dollars of those sub-fifty buck jobs, while I have my eighty or ninety dollar ones sharpened two or three times, for ten to twenty bucks a shot.

    Dave

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    • #3
      Totally agree with Dave A.---not only (and I'm not talking Forrest) does a good quality blade last longer between sharpenings---the cut is generally more accurate. Obviously, much of your blade inventory/needs will be dictacted by the work you're doing, but spend the bucks on your most frequently needed blades--for me, good 40T combo and a rip blade.

      However, for those blades infrequently used---don't overlook good old HSS. Had to cut some mellamine this weekend----didn't have any special blade, so dusted off my old Sears plywood, HSS blade---made perfect cuts with no chip-out.
      Dave

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      • #4
        I believe you tend to get what you pay for. My original Ridgid blade was fine for roughing out stuff, but then I spent the 100+ bucks and got a Forrest Woodworker II blade. It's amazing and I highly recommend it to all.

        Michael

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        • #5
          So even though I am happy with the results of my sub $50 blade now, I should still buy the more expensive better quality blades because the money I save on the blade's initial cost would be offset by the frequency of replacement? Ok, this makes sense to me.

          Ok, now I understand the importance of NOT skimping on the blade and I am convinced to buy better quality blades. which brands beside Forrest should be considered? I will get all of the life I can get out of my current blade since it is performing just fine right now, but when I have to replace it, I won't skimp.

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          • #6
            I use a Leitz ripping blade, which costs about $50, and a Systimatic fine crosscut, which is about $80. When you look at the industrial blades (which certainly includes Freud's "L" and "F" series), you'll really notice the difference in size of the carbide tips. That's where the cost comes in, carbide is expensive.

            Dave

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            • #7
              I wholeheartedly agree with the others when it comes to tools, you get what you pay for. I replaced mine with a Freud LU84R011 50 tooth combination blade; Amazon delivered it to my door for $45. It is a definite improvement over the stock blade and I'm pleased with the overall results I’m getting. I’m not at all disappointed with the Freud but I will probably purchase a Forest sometime in the future if I ever have an over abundance of cash flow. I have the Freud 96 tooth on my 12-inch Miter Saw and it really does produce amazingly smooth cuts.

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              • #8
                You might want to check out Rockler. I was there yesterday and they have the Forrest WWII blade for $89. I've only seen it previously for $105 at Woodcraft and mail-order.

                I might go and pick up another one for a spare.

                Michael

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                • #9
                  i had the same dilema with choosing a sawblade for my ridgid table saw. after trying a few cheaper alternatives i began to do a little research and comparison. i was almost sold on the Forrest woodworker II when i came across carbide.com. they happen to be local for me so i went in and spoke with one of the folks there. what i found out about the forrest saw blades shocked me. they indicated to me that they are among the best on the market, but they are a "straight cut blade". which as he explained it, provided one hell of a finish but they do dull much quicker than conventional blades. he recommended the amana blades which were actually a little less expensive than the CMT. But since i use CMT router bits and am kind of loyal to them i gave them a shot. I bought the 10" general blae and i couldnt be happier. I did find that for mitre cuts on my table saw in harder wood it did want to burn a little but this was easily corrected with a set of sawblade stabilizers. i am so happy with the general that when it came time for a dedicated rip blade i looked at all my options and settled again on the CMT. as you said in your post you get what you pay for. The CMT blades are well worth the money. I could have probably gotten by with the general for ripping as well but i have found myself ripping a lot of poplar lately and the harder woods tend to take their toll on the blade.

                  if the cmt is still a little pricy for you i would suggest a higher end Freud combo blade. a bit less expensive but a quality blade for the money.
                  \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                  • #10
                    Hey Dave,

                    Where can one find these Leitz blades for sale. Their Web site is of little help.

                    Best regards,

                    Henry

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                    • #11
                      On-line, www.carbide.com has them, go to quick search and enter 831R as the part number. Hey, less than I thought, only $42.

                      Your local resharpener or industrial blade shop that deals with the cabinet shops may also sell them.

                      Dave

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                      • #12
                        Thanks Dave, and while we are on the topic, I was checking out those Systimatic blades - what a selection! What would you recommend as a good choice for getting good crosscuts in hardwood - precision trim or super finish - or something else? How many teeth? Thanks so much.

                        Best regards,

                        Henry

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                        • #13
                          I use a Systi 37338, the 80 tooth precision trim. Odd, it looks like www.carbide.com is selling it as SYS-1240 for $96.45. But, Woodcraft sells it as 07B26 for $76.99. Unless there's something different about the blade that I can't tell, which I don't think since the specs are just the same. I'd recommend either getting it from Woodcraft, or calling Paul Dineen over at carbide.com (he's a co-owner). Tell him I pointed out the price discrepancy, I'm sure he would do his best. Paul's a great guy.

                          Trick with this blade is that it needs a sloooow feed. If it burns, you're going too slow, otherwise you aren't. Gives a stunning finish on end grain.

                          Dave

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