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  • #16
    I get it now, we do it the same way, just splain it different. Thanks

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    • #17
      Greetings all. I have enjoyed snooping around these forums for a while. Lots of good stuff shared on techniques, set-up and some great advice for any level of woodworker. So... now I'm going to chime in. All this crown up, edge flipping makes me dizzy. First of all, you gotta get one square edge. If you sight down an edge of a board,it has a bulge or high spot somewhere along its length.(Could have more than one) The jointer's purpose is to trim away those bulges or high spots until they are flat with the rest of the board edge. As you joint, say 1/16" or so per pass, you'll see where the material has been cut away from the high spots. Just keep jointing the edge until the whole edge has a fresh cut surface. Now you have a reference side to rip a second sqare edge on your table saw. For board faces, the exact same routine will work either on the jointer (up to its width) or better yet, on a surface planer. Now how was that again, does the letter "U" mean crown up or crown down?

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      • #18
        well the planer works great. beautiful piece of machinery!

        My face jointing technique stinks. still very awkward to me with the push blocks. i find myself using my hand to apply constant presure and my table saw push stick/handle to feed it.

        I just can not get the hang of using those darn push blocks!
        \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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        • #19
          Hello, now for my two cents worth...

          I learned in cabinet making 101 that you thickness plane first, then edge joint one edge, then TS to width, and finally chopsaw to length.


          By face planing first, you get a straight surface to put against the fence on the jointer. Then, after jointing, you have a straight surface to put against the TS fence, and finally cut to length.

          When jointing, place the board on the jointer table and try to rock it. If it rocks, turn it over and joint. If you joint it with the "rocker" side down, all you are doing is compounding the warp in the board as when it passes over the knives, your pressure will "rock" the board so it keeps planing the curve into the board.

          And, the proper feed direction is, on the planer, the peaks of the grain go away from the machine, and on the jointer, the peaks go into the machine.

          If this is confusing, let me know and I will try it again.

          Jeff
          If you don\'t know.... say so

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Da Pope:
            I learned in cabinet making 101 that you thickness plane first Jeff
            Maybe when you get to cabinet making 102 you will learn the right way. See posts by Hewood and Desmo above.
            Lorax
            "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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            • #21
              Lorax: Da pope maybe learned more in 101 than you think. If you read closely, Space bought a planer-not a jointer. Heywood and Desmo are refering to jointing. You don't need an edge jointed first to use a thickness planer. The general rule of thumb IS to plane first and then joint an edge. Jim

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              • #22
                If you read closer you will see that Spaceblue had a jointer first and then bought a planer. At least that's the way it looks to me. If I am wrong, then I apologize.

                If you are working with rough cut wood (which he is) and run it through the planer first, the planer will just follow any twist, bow, or warp in the wood (and all rough cut lumber has it to some extent). The two faces may be parallel, but the board is still not flat, which is one of the purposes of the jointer.

                One thing a planer can do is remove a cup from a wide board easier than a jointer (if you take real light cuts).

                If you can show me an authoritative source for your "general rule of thumb" I will concede.

                Have a great day! Peace!

                Oops! Just reread Hewoods' post above and he said the same thing. I knew I read it somewhere. Or maybe it's just a case of "great minds think alike". [img]tongue.gif[/img]
                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                • #23
                  Lorax

                  you are correct.

                  the planer came AFTER the table saw and jointer.

                  and I am loving it. Finally got the jointer technique working in my favor. I had some silver maple milled and kiln dried from a tree we had cut down, and man does it clean up nice. what a grain pattern. The planer works NICE.

                  my only problem is that i need to get the electric in my house upgraded. we only have 70 amp, only 15 going out to the garage. as long as i am only running one tool, i am usually doing ok, unless i am working with hard wood. what I tend to end up doing is running an ext cord from the basement and borrowing from the washer and dryer circuit.

                  i am figuring to upgrade to 150 and run 50 out to the garage. that should do it!

                  until thena little at a time and an occasional trip to the basement to reset that breaker
                  \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by spacebluesonoma:
                    i am figuring to upgrade to 150 and run 50 out to the garage. that should do it!
                    I know you didn't ask for advice on this, but that never stopped me before. [img]tongue.gif[/img] As long as you are upgrading, go with a 200 amp main and at least a 60 amp sub in the shop . What is this garage of which you speak? At least 2 220 v outlets would be a good idea too.
                    Lorax
                    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                    • #25
                      Lorax

                      yeah but the price difference between 150 and 200 is pretty hefty. In all actuality i have right now a small cape cod which could stand just fine with the 70 amp service we have. Upgrading to 100 is a given, but 150 should suffice. i can get 50 out to the shop on a sub panel and call it good. This is not our dream home and will not be staying put for the rest of our life. My wife and I bought a nice starter home way under valued from an elderly woman who was the original owner. Many of the homes out here are original owner or 2nd generation owners "folks house" etc.

                      My garage that is acting as my shop is on it's last leg. it was a 1 car garage with a porch on the outside. The previous owner enclosed that porch so in theory it is a 2 car garage but there is a wall and then a small area for storage. Not a lot of room to work. the roof was bulit poorly, if you can believe it, it has a 1X8 ridge board and 2X8 rafters. the walls are litteraly bulging out and the floor is all cracked and sunk and such. A new garage would run about 7-8K here. Should we stay, once we get the siding and window home equity loan paid off, we might consider a new garage so for now i have a small shop and 50 amps will do ok for now.

                      from reading the reviews and such, for the kind of work I do, i see no need to run my table saw and such 220.

                      Now when we move again if we do not build a custom home, we will be taking into consideration a "shop", if we build, the "shop" is going to be an awe inspiring site.

                      My other problem is that the garage is not insulated so I can not heat it efficently in the winter. I only get 3 or 4 solid months of any real work. ANd this year it will be less than that as I will be recovering from back surgery. I am limited in what I can do now, and will be even more limited directly after surgery and allthrough physical therapy. By then it will be getting cold and another woodworking season will have come and gone;(

                      I appreciate the advice solicited or otherwise

                      Thanks for the input

                      Ed
                      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                      • #26
                        With the info you just provided, it sounds like you have thought this through pretty well. Sorry for butting in. [img]tongue.gif[/img]
                        Best of luck with your surgery. Hope everything goes well. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                        Lorax
                        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                        • #27
                          Lorax please by all means butt in whenever you have a thought. it is welcome! thank you
                          \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                          • #28
                            Ok group now that we have discussed the basic 101 on whether the planer came before the mill, please comment on the tools themselves...Ridgid Joiner,Mill,Dewalt Joiner,Mill, Sears ,Ryobi etc.

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                            • #29
                              Personally I own the Ridgid JP6010 and the Dewalt DW734. Love them both.
                              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                              • #30
                                Well, guess I should have failed 101! So, from this point on, I will just put whatever crooked side of my lumber against the jointer fence and then hope the edge is straight enough to put against the saw fence to get a straight line. And my planer is apparently broken since it doesn't follow the cup on the wood, but seemed to get a very straight side, at least until I found out I was doing it wrong.
                                So, after 27 years building custome and reproduction furniture, I will need to re-educate my 17 employees so they will start doing it in the correct order.
                                Thanks so much for the correction, wish it would have come long ago and saved me from all of these years of doing it wrong....
                                If you don\'t know.... say so

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