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  • #31
    Hey, no problem.
    It's never too late to learn.
    Glad we could help. [img]tongue.gif[/img]
    Lorax
    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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    • #32
      Basically it comes down to what each tool is for. The jointer's job is to square up one side of the board. A perfect 90. Edge and one face. Then that face is used as a reference for the thickness planer to square the third side.

      For the record, for the heck of it, i did run a piece of rough sawn through the planer first, with no reference, it simply followed the imperfections in the other side of the wood. i had a semi smooth crooked piece of wood.

      I mean no disrespect, but if the thickness planer was designed to start the process there would be no need for that sled that was posted earlier in this thread. Without a face jointed (planed) square piece for reference, the Thickness planer is worthless.
      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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      • #33
        Spacebluesonoma,
        I agree 100%. No matter where you're at in the process, you need a ref point. As you say, a jointer is to square one edge for this ref point. The planer is made to smooth and square the face of the board. All a jointer is for is the edge. That is why you can buy a 4 1/2" jointer, but a planer usually starts at 12" or more.
        Anyhow, this is supposed to be fun and it is. Don't think we're ever too old to learn, but sometimes hearing gets in the way.... Jeff
        If you don\'t know.... say so

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Da Pope:
          All a jointer is for is the edge.
          Not quite true Jeff. There are actually 12" jointers available as well. The purpose of a jointer (as Ed states) is to make one face flat(cant be done on a planer without special jigs) and then to set one edge exactly 90* to the face it just flattened.

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          • #35
            Guess I stand corrected.... I have never seen a jointer wider than 8". Don't know why you would need a 12" thick board, but would think it would be just as easy to true on a planer instead of a jointer.... I know one of the problems my apprentices have is confusing a "jointer" with a "planer". As FWW said, there is no such thing as a jointer/planer no matter what the ad department says..... a jointer is for trueing an edge, a planer is for flattening a board face....
            If you don\'t know.... say so

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Da Pope:
              I have never seen a jointer wider than 8".
              Now this is a jointer! 24" x 9' table!

              Lorax
              "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Da Pope:
                As FWW said, there is no such thing as a jointer/planer no matter what the ad department says
                Maybe not any more, but there sure were back when men were men and sheep ran scared.

                Lorax
                "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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                • #38
                  As I said my understanding is that the planer is worthless without the jointer. The jointer has 2 flat surfaces, the infeed and outfeed table. The outfeed is obviously set a little higher than the infeed so that you can take off a little at a time until that board is perfectly flat. THE ONLY WAY YOU CAN DO THIS IS WITH TWO PERFECTLY FLAT SURFACES. The thickness planer does not have 2 perfectly flat surfaces. the outer edges of the infeed and outfeed table are level, but there is a bow in the middle of the TP. So when running a flat board through the TP can take off as much or as little as it needs on that face to make it perfect. If you run rough sawn lumber through the planer first, if it has a bow, it will follow the countour of the tables, meaning that it will be lower in the middle than at the two ends. You may smooth the face, but it will not be flat. It will be bowed when it comes out. By running a flat board face down it will not follow the contour of the thickness planer. that flat face will remain flat meaning that when it hits the middle of the TP it will not be touching the table. It will meet up again at the end.

                  Yes they make bigger jointers. Most DIY'rs and most folks that do it for a hobby only buy the 6"

                  What this will allow for is let's say you are making a table top or some other flat surface. You will square one face and two sides on the jointer. Lets assume you are using 4" boards. YOu can joint three 4" boards, using a perfectly flat surface you can glue them up, then run that entire 12" piece through the TP and have a uniform surface. Instead of the possibility of 3 boards being glued that would have the potential of not being uniform.

                  The more I play with this thing the more i learn and the more it makes sense!

                  Now on this subject. When face jointing, why can you not take say a 8" board. Set the fence on the jointer just under 4". Joint one side, and then with the same side down turn it around and use the jointer for the other half? I can't figure out why that wouldn't work??
                  \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                  • #39
                    I find that I get a bit of a taper when I joint a board (always a bit more material removed at the leading edge), since you need to flip the board the taper would be at opposite ends of the board. If there is even the slightest twist in the board it would be near impossible to remove it jointing 1/2 a board at a time

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                    • #40
                      WB

                      that makes sense i guess. Doesn't seem "right" in "theory" but how theory works out on paper and out in reality are two different things. I am an electronics technician by trade and the above words are so very true. I have seen a lot of things that "work on paper" but not in reality. I have had situations where i have followed the troubleshooting matrix to the letter on a radar and all of the test points check out perfectly but the damn thing still doesn't work. When I have finally found the problem, there is no way in hell that all of the test points should have been able to check out perfect, but they did.

                      I guess that is the same here. But as I was typing this, what you were saying makes sense. if the board has a bow in it, the leading edge is going to have a lot more wood taken off than the trailing edge. Flipping it does not account for the other half of the bow, so now you will take more off the original "trailing edge" and will never get it flat.
                      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                      • #41
                        Space,

                        Just a thought but most houses, unless they are historically old, have a 220 VAC outler for a clothes dryer in or near the garage. If this is the case in your cape cod you could easily make a break out cable that would give you two 120 VAC circuits of most likely 20 amps each.

                        For heavy loads, machine start up I suggest at least 12 gauge or larger cable.

                        If you have the dryer outlet this should get you through untill you can upgrade your load center.

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