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  • Milling sequence/woodworking 101

    OK

    after years of watching The New Yankee Workshop, Woodworks, Reading several hundred woodworking magazines, a subscription to shopnotes and fantasizing for months that i will someday soon own a Thickness planer.....Santa delivered one.

    In my excitement apparently i have forgotten the basics and want to "measure twice cut once" and check the proper sequence here. Because I have been through my Tivo with several episodes of both and my magazines and still can not find the simplest of things so i want to double check my memory.....

    1) joint one edge

    2)use that jointed edge if necessary to rip so the jointer can handle it

    3) face joint one edge using the jointed edge as a reference.

    4) flip and thickness plane using jointed face as a reference.

    5) once again rip using jointed edge to final dimension,

    Is this correct?

    Thanks all for answering another spaceblue woodworking 101 sanity check

    Happy New Year to All


    Ed
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    I got all confused by all of your flipping,
    I basically use the rule of thumb that my fences & planer beds are true, so they should always meet a freshly jointed or sawn face.. it makes sense to me but it might confuse you!!!

    PS, KUDOS on your webpage, I spend far too much in kibble to participate in foster & rescue programs to be considered intelligent when it comes to dogs but oh how I love those big damnned Danes & Rotties!!

    Comment


    • #3
      Dan

      so how do you start with a rough sawn board with no factory/square edge? that is my point.

      thanks for the mention of the website. Not doing the rescue thing, just getting our dog's story out there and hoping to help/warn others so they don't make the same mistake

      thanks happy new year
      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

      Comment


      • #4
        BTW forgot to ask, which TP didja get??

        I will usually;
        1)joint best face
        2)joint adjoining face to give exact 90* corner
        3)cut to dimension with freshly jointed faces on saw top and against fence

        ..3 sides now straight & square

        4) last cut made and all four sides are straight, true & square.

        If your stock is already cut to near dimension then you could joint one side then run that face down on the bed of the planer to true the opposite face!

        Best tip I can give you from my experience is to use Flip-tops or roller stands for the long boards, sucks to have to plane out snipe and re-plan the project because the long board is now a couple 32nds skinnyer. I've done it too many times because I'm stupid enough to belive I can hold it level but the slightest difference when you're standing 8'+ from the cutter head will really mess up the first or last 12" of a board.

        Comment


        • #5
          The first step should be to flatten one face of the board. If the face isn't flat, it will affect the accuracy of the edge when you try to square it.

          1) face joint
          2) edge joint adjacent edge
          3) place opposite face
          4) rip to width, or rip close to width and clean up the edge on the jointer.

          Comment


          • #6
            You might also try this solution to eliminating snipe; http://www.woodshopdemos.com/plan-pm.htm

            Basically John built a extended bed for his planer which he supports on the ends with a couple stands. The bed is the width of the planer capacity and does not move, the workpiece travels through the planer sliding ontop of the bed extension. You can get a better idea of his solution and how it works if you follow the link above, he has step-by-step photos as he does for all his projects on the site.

            Comment


            • #7
              I have only had a jointer for a short time,but don't know how you would FACE joint a board on a 6" jointer. I start by cutting lumber to aprox. length. 2. run through the planer on both sides to get final thickness.3. joint one edge to get square. 4.rip other edge on TS to final width. Trim ends to final length and square with TS sled. Maybe I am doing it wrong, but has been working just fine for me for over 3 years that I have been doing woodworking. MHO
              info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

              Comment


              • #8
                Space,

                Joint one face (crown side down)
                Joint one edge (crown side down)
                Rip to width
                Plane to thickness

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by papadan:
                  I have only had a jointer for a short time,but don't know how you would FACE joint a board on a 6" jointer. I start by cutting lumber to aprox. length. 2. run through the planer on both sides to get final thickness.3. joint one edge to get square. 4.rip other edge on TS to final width. Trim ends to final length and square with TS sled. Maybe I am doing it wrong, but has been working just fine for me for over 3 years that I have been doing woodworking. MHO
                  The board would have to be less than 6" to face joint on a 6" machine. It's possible to face joint wider boards on a planer (up to the planer's capacity) if you use a sled and some shims. Without the sled and shims, putting a board with surface shape irregularities through the planer will just make it thinner for the most part, not flatter (not much anyway). The irregularities will still be there (simple cupping is an exception). The planer makes one side "parallel" to the opposite side regardless of the original shape. The good news is that the boards don't necessarily have to be perfectly flat to get acceptable results.

                  I've heard of people removing the guard on a 6" jointer to do wider boards in two passes, but I've never tried it, and therefore won't recommend trying it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I know you can face joint narrow boards but most of what I use is 8-12 inches wide. I am careful when buying my wood, wont pay the high prices for warped boards. In the case of a warped board, I will just rip it down to a usable piece.
                    info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      i get kiln dried oak for .60 aboard foot. i had a silver maple taken down out of my back yard and had the trunk cut down to 6' lengths. had it milled and kiln dried for .60 a board foot.

                      so now i have a bunch of rough sawn oak and silver maple
                      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Chefdan (sorry guys I know this is a Ridgid board and in my defense my table saw and jointer are ridgid), but the thickness planer i got is the Dewalt DW734
                        \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hi space, I think Desmo said it the easiest way, just be sure you crown your wood.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Desmo, I agree with you sequence but can you tell me why you prefer crown down instead of crown up? I do crown up so I take evenly form each end of the board. With crown down wouldn't you be taking all the material form one end? If you try to take the material from the crown peak woundn't you have problems with rocking? Not saying I'm right just, always looking to improve if there is a better method

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Wbrooks,

                              I believe we are talking symantics. Here is my definition of "Crown" and its orientation:

                              Using the letter "U" to represent a warped board, the crown would be in the "crown up" position. Inverting the the letter would be "crown down"; the two upright sides of the letter form the "crown" and would be fed into the jointer, along the bed, to be cut first.

                              As you said, (which does mean that you are right and it is ok for you to say it) keeping two points of contact at the base for stability so that the board does not rock back and forth - a big no-no.

                              Don't forget that I am from Louisiana and the closest thing to a real crown we have is our King Cake at Mardi Gras.

                              [ 01-04-2005, 08:50 AM: Message edited by: Desmo888 ]

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