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  • TS3650 Blade alignment

    Finally got around to "fine-tuning" my relatively new TS3650 and began taking measurements with a dial indicator on the aligment of the blade (in reference to the left miter gauge slot). When I initially put the saw together, I just checked this with a ruler and it looked pretty good. Now that I've set up a way to use a dial indicator, I wanted to know what is considered "acceptable" runout on the arbor, and therefore the blade, before I begin monkeying around with the adjustments. You all know the saying "If it ain't broken, don't fix it"? Well, perhaps you can help me determine if it is indeed "broken". Thanks.

  • #2
    Lou---seems you may be talking about a couple of different measurements. If you're aligning the blade with the miter slot---you should be using the same marked tooth at front and back. If you're talking about blade or arbor run-out, that's a different matter. The first thing is to get the blade dead-on square to the table surface, than check your distances to the miter slot. Rebember, you blade can have it's on runout as can the arbor flange and arbor shaft.

    I'd highly recommend Mark Duginske's book, Mastering Woodworking Machines. I believe the acceptable differences are in the thousandths.
    Dave

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    • #3
      I spent way too much time trying to get my blade to be 0.000. I finally settled for 0.003.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        dave, there WE go again.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          Dave

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          • #6
            I had this quandry when I got my saw too. Ideally you should be able to get your saw within .001 for optimal results

            .003 was the best answer I came up within tolerances on the high end though from searching many reputable sources.

            I got mine to approx .0005 so was within the .001 tolerances - You Should only set it up once for the life of saw - so I figure it's worth the tinkering with til you get it within .001. Took me about 15 minutes of banging the wood block and loosening and tightening bolts.

            Good luck

            Jake

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            • #7
              Jake---boy are you an optomist---once in the life of the saw??? Many of use are practiced in the methods because we have to tune alignment per project or avg. once a year.
              Dave

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              • #8
                Could be - I haven't noticed it yet. I know others that don't have to worry bout it either. Maybe the Ridgid's have to be tuned more - but not a problem with my PM yet?

                You missing woodnet like I am? It's back up btw - in case you didn't notice

                Jake

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                • #9
                  Thanks for info folks.I am measuring from the same tooth at the front and back. What should I align first? Squareness to the table? or distance from the miter slot? I realize both need to be aligned, but I figure with all the experience out there, a specific order might be easier than the next. Thanks.

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                  • #10
                    Never mind that last question, just reread Daveferg's initial response - squareness first, then distance to slot. Thanks.

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                    • #11
                      First - squarness of blade to miter slot

                      Second - squareness of fence to same miter slot

                      3rd - You're done

                      Happy cutting [img]smile.gif[/img]

                      Jake

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                      • #12
                        Had some time over the weekend to perfect my jig to hold the dial indicator and therefore be able to take measurements I could count on. With a little finagling(sp?) I got it to .0025" and decided I could live with it. Trying to adjust that front trunion was a pain in the a--! Ended up actually getting the last couple thou using that eccentric lever by the rear trunnion. I wanted to get the blade position right before I cut into my ZCI (not a ridgid - picked it up at a show) and the damn ZCI is too thick to fit into the recess with the 10" blade installed!! It's about 2x as thick as the standard issue insert. I was thinking of putting a smaller blade on and getting the kerf cut started, then put the 10" back on to finish it. Any ideas?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Mad Lou:
                          I was thinking of putting a smaller blade on and getting the kerf cut started, then put the 10" back on to finish it. Any ideas?
                          That's the way I'd do it. [img]smile.gif[/img]
                          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mad Lou:
                            I was thinking of putting a smaller blade on and getting the kerf cut started, then put the 10" back on to finish it. Any ideas?
                            --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            That's the way I'd do it. (end of quote)

                            The manual that came with the saw says different and I would not use the manual's method. The manual says to tighten the flat head screw completely and then loosen 3 turns. Place the rear in the clip and put the zero clearance front on top of the screw. It actually says Note: Front of insert will be above the table to allow for clearance of sawblade. Then you do the clamping of board etc. This is all on page 47. This actually is a better way because I used a 7 inch circular blade then the regular one but my ZCI has a spot where you can see the 7 inch blade made its mark. I also wonder if the slot created by the 7 inch blade may somehow not be exact and as the 10 inch blade cuts its path it may actually deflect a little as it hits the 7 inch spot and then you permanently have a slight rubbing against the 7 inch mark.
                            Gary

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                            • #15
                              It is clear that with some models of stack and safety dado blade sets that there can be clearance and alignment issues when used in conjunction with the RIDGID® Model TS3650 table saw. We apologize for any confusion or performance issues that they may have created for those of you who have experienced a problem of this nature. This problem does not occur with all dado blade sets so as a result RIDGID would like to provide you with this means of assistance should you have a concern with your TS3650 arbor and the use of specialty blades like dado sets.

                              PLEASE CALL RIDGID TECHNICAL SERVICE AT 1-(866)-427-8177.

                              Our experienced technical support staff will quickly be able to diagnose any potential issues you may have with your TS3650 arbor. If you do have a problem, we will stand behind you and do what we can to supply you with a remedy so that you have the optimum performance, productivity, and enjoyment out of your RIDGID TS3650.

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