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Projects drawn in CAD programs...

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  • Projects drawn in CAD programs...

    Many folks are always asking about using CAD software’s for designing projects... I think it is a great way to spend a little time planning and thinking about what you want to make before you make it...

    The link below is an example of a very simple drawing I made of a cedar wagon for indoors or outdoors... I drew it up in AutoCAD in 3D and then made a flat layout showing all of my potential cuts... It allows you to nest your parts in a reasonable manor out of your material before you ever begin... You must still keep grain in mind but it sure makes it nice when you get to the shop and start building... You get to build it before you really build it…

    3D is nice if you can get around drawing in that manor but 2D will in many cases be enough to get the job done…

    I saved the file to a .pdf format so it can be easily viewed... Cedar Wagon.pdf (22kb)

    Hope this helps... [img]smile.gif[/img]
    Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

  • #2
    That's sweet Rob. I still use a drafting board. I can't figure out CAD's.

    Ever consider teaching basic CAD?
    John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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    • #3
      Actually I do teach beginner AutoCAD... It is very enjoyable to help someone learn something new and progress there skills, but Michigan is a bit far for me... [img]smile.gif[/img]

      If you were closer, I would be glad to...
      Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

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      • #4
        my wife is an architect and very fluent in cad. she has offered to teach me but it is much easier and less time consuming for me to give her a hand drawn idea and have her take 15 minutes to give me a accurate drawing to scale with all lengths and angles figured out. maybe someday i will learn how to use it. she is afraid to learn how to use the shop tools and i stay away from cad. i guess it is possible that if she were to teach me cad she would want to play with my table saw....not sure i want that trade
        \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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        • #5
          Big J, nice job - if only a simple design. For me design and visualization are most important. I've begun to use Autodesk Inventor and plan to design all my woodworking projects with it. It will definitely help me eliminate errors due to sloppy math. I will also be able to explore design variations better than the old "I wonder what it would look like if..." I will try to post some designs as I develop them. Thanks for bringing up this thread.

          Best regards,

          Henry

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          • #6
            For those of you who want to take it a step further and try solid modeling, you can get a free version of pro/ENGINEER from www.ptc.com. I've tried it and it seems pretty easy to learn and also seems to have most of the functions that would be needed to solid model.

            Jake

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            • #7
              As a mechanical engineer, I use 3D modeling software almost daily, usually Solid Works. I've reached a point now where I have a hard time planning a serious woodworking project without it. It is especially helpful with curved pieces, or calculating the proper length of a piece to be bent. Instead of calculating these dimensions you just draw it and measure. And as someone already pointed out, an accurate 3D model let you see what it will look like before you start cutting. That's really handy when you're starting from scratch, or scaling an existing plan. Just my experience.

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              • #8
                Thanks Rob for the offer. For a small world, locations are often just out of reach, aye?

                I guess I'll have to just take time off the shop and spend some dedicated hours and try to figure it out. I think my biggest problem is I'm use to seeing the drawing pallet in front of me. In CAD it so different. I know what I want to draw, just don't know what to do to make it happen.

                That Delta Cad works alot like the Draft Choice Plus I have, which I got the furthest in. But still barely able to draw a square on the screen.
                John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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