Announcement Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.
contractor table saws Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • contractor table saws

    I'm in the market for a new table saw. Could anyone share their experiences (good and bad) with the table saws they have purchased. I am considering a contractor grade as opposed to a bench top or cabinet grade.

  • #2
    GPeters, if you are planning to put any amount of plywood through your saw, go with the biggest table you can afford. The bigger the better. (Pushing a sheet of plywood through a benchtop is almost impossible, and rather unsafe). Go with a 10" saw with separate motor (belt drive) for best power, and, my preferrence is a cast iron table. Remember to 'wash' the table top (and all your metal tools) from time to time with kerosine...it contains parafin wax that will be left behind when the solvent evaporates. Never use any other kind of solvent or gasoline...that will remove any wax/oil protection and start the rust process. Good luck. Jules

    Comment


    • #3
      My suggestion would be to get a cast iron top, belt driven saw of any brand. Any cast iron saw will be an improvement over a benchtop or portable saw. Of course being the moderator I'm practical to RIDGID . Seriously take a look at a cast iron top belt driven saw. The advantages over the benchtop saws is significant

      Jake Schnarre
      Product Manager
      Emerson Tool Co.

      Comment


      • #4
        <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Julius:
        GPeters, if you are planning to put any amount of plywood through your saw, go with the biggest table you can afford. The bigger the better. (Pushing a sheet of plywood through a benchtop is almost impossible, and rather unsafe). Go with a 10" saw with separate motor (belt drive) for best power, and, my preferrence is a cast iron table. Remember to 'wash' the table top (and all your metal tools) from time to time with kerosine...it contains parafin wax that will be left behind when the solvent evaporates. Never use any other kind of solvent or gasoline...that will remove any wax/oil protection and start the rust process. Good luck. Jules<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

        Thanks for the kerosene tip . I never knew that it contained parafin wax.

        Jim

        Comment


        • #5
          <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by gpeters:
          I'm in the market for a new table saw. Could anyone share their experiences (good and bad) with the table saws they have purchased. I am considering a contractor grade as opposed to a bench top or cabinet grade.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

          An accurate and adjustable rip fence is mandatory.The miter gauge must also be high quality. I haven't used the Ridgid saw but it looks impressive .

          Comment


          • #6
            I have had Delta contractor table saw. Two years I bought RIGID table saw with special
            casters, This is a very powerful saw for any type of woodworking. Belt drive, cast iron
            top and exstensions, I'm not just saying this because this a RIDID site. Check it out

            Comment


            • #7
              I, also have purchased a Ridgid cast iron top, belt driven table saw and find it an excellant tool. It has ample power and yet is unusally quiet. The fence is very accurate and the top size is adaquate for most jobs.

              It should be one you consider


              Comment


              • #8
                I have a contractor's saw, 10" w/ external belt drive. Cast top is the only way to go. Although I have many excellent Ridgid tools in my shop, I chose a Jet for several reasons, "Ridgid-take notes".
                The saw has a solid cast top with Two cast extensions. It comes standard with an EXACTA fence and 30" extension. For your information, this is the same fence design as Beismeyer. It has a 1&1/2 hp motor that can be run at 115v or 230v. After market tools are important to a crafter and most after market items are available for this unit. It has more than ample power to handle the toughest jobs successfully. I constantly rip full dimension cypress in 16' lengths, cut sheet material,both mdf and lumbercore plywood, and size cedar, walnut, oak,etc.
                I have researched the tools in my shop very carefully. I researched this table saw over a year before I purchased it.
                I use Ridgid's Jointer, scroll saw, lathe,vacuume and Planer and researched them just as hard. My money is hard to come by so I try to spend it wisely.
                Hope this helps you with your queries and doesn't offend the sponsors.
                Sincerely,
                baupaw

                ------------------

                Comment


                • #9
                  We are not at all insulted. Matter of fact we welcome comments about competetor's units, both good and bad. That allows us to build tools that better serve our customer.

                  Jake

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have heard of Kerosine to clean the top but after that I always use Johnson's Paste Wax and then buff it off, It leaves the top slick and wood slides easily......
                    I also use it on both infeed and outfeed tables on the portable planer, my jointer........
                    Works great.....

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I opted for a 10inch Jet mainly for the fence. I have been extremely satisfied with it, however I bought a Ridgid Planer This year and am realy pleased with the planer. Whatever you decide to purchase, remember big top is a must if you are doing big pieces of wood. The Ridgid life time warranty can't be beat by anyone yet.
                      flattop

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I certainly agree with 10", belt drive (link type reduces vibration), cast iron extensions, powerful motor, sharp "true" blades etc.

                        Handling large sheets of plywood in a small shop is not my favorite thing to do. Having enough table surface to support the sheets is the key to accurate and Safe cuts.

                        I have one work/assembly bench that is the same height as my RA saw and another that is the same height as my Table saw. I built a Jointech Router center and sized it to the height of the table saw too. By arranging all these surfaces independently, you can enhance your ability to cut the big sheets, by having them supported throughout the entire cut.

                        A good contractor saw, Ridgid, Delta, Jet, Grizzly, Powermatic etc. will be a good investment.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by havacer:
                          Thanks for the kerosene tip . I never knew that it contained parafin wax.
                          <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                          Ever see an old farm tractor, still in use, with rust? Not likely. Old farmers always washed their tractors down with kerosene, an without realizing it, waxed them in the process. The red paint may have faded to orange, but it sure didn't rust.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Ray Lancon:
                            I have heard of Kerosine to clean the top but after that I always use Johnson's Paste Wax and then buff it off, It leaves the top slick and wood slides easily......
                            I also use it on both infeed and outfeed tables on the portable planer, my jointer........
                            Works great.....
                            <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                            Ray, I have a confession...I too use paste wax (Arrow) to keep my jointer tables, table saw and router table (Veritas) in top condition. I like the way it makes wood 'glide' over the surface. However, for general purpose cleaning and conditioning of any and all metal tools, I always start with kerosene. In many cases (saw blades,hand planes, drill bits, forstner bits, etc) thats all I use. Kerosene also works great to remove pitch. Cheers, Jules


                            Comment


                            • #15
                              For you guys using paste wax on your saws be very careful that it does not contain silicon. Some paste waxes do and silicon is the last thing you want to get on your wood. I use carnauba wax. I only had a rust problem once on my table saw, thanks to my cat, and I took care of that with 400 wet/dry emery paper. Another good substance for coating your hand tools is virgin olive oil. It is just as good as camellia oil and costs about 1/10th as much, and you can dip your bread sticks in it. I have a great contractors Craftman tablesaw which I believe was made by Ridgid at the time. I am now planning on buying a 3hp Powermatic cabinet saw but only because I just want it, not because there is anything wrong with my contractors saw.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X