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  • Repeat crosscutting

    I have a TS2424 tablesaw. I would like to know what is the best and safest way to set up the tablesaw to do repeat crosscuts. Basically, I want to cut a number of pieces of wood to the same exact size. The wood will vary from 1x2 and 1x4s to 2x4s. The lengths vary from a couple of inches up to 24". The TS2424 manual had a suggestion for pieces shorter than 6" but don't understand that limitation. I would also like to hear suggestions how to to go beyond 24" if that is a possibility. Thanks.

  • #2
    Ivan,

    Repeatablity up to abaout 23" is pretty easy. set the fence as a stop and use the miter guage. (Caps used for emphasis) MAKE SURE THAT YOU ATTACH AN AUXILLARY FENCE IN FRONT OF THE BLADE, SO THAT WHEN THE PIECE CONTACTS THE BLADE IT IS NOT TOUCHING THE FENCE, THIS IS A DEFINATE RECIPE FOR KICKBACK. (see ascii drawing below) For longer pieces you may want to attach an auxillary fence to the miter guage for extra support. Beyound 24" I would use a miter saw of RAS (if you have one) with stop blocks.

    ASCII Drawing
    _
    | |
    | | |
    | | |
    Blade | | | fence
    | |
    _| |
    | | |
    Aux Fence | | |
    | | |
    |_|_
    -Rob<br /> <a href=\"http://home.comcast.net/~robritch/\" target=\"_blank\">http://home.comcast.net/~robritch/</a> <br />Damn, I hit the wrong nail again. Ouch that hurts

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    • #3
      Ivan,

      Ascii drawing did not work. If you do not undertand what I mean about attaching the aux fence to prevent kickback, PLEASE let me know and I will send you a picture of the setup. Be very carfeul about kick back, it is VERY dangerous, and can really hurt like hell if you are in the way when it happens DAMHIKT
      -Rob<br /> <a href=\"http://home.comcast.net/~robritch/\" target=\"_blank\">http://home.comcast.net/~robritch/</a> <br />Damn, I hit the wrong nail again. Ouch that hurts

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      • #4
        The very very best and safest thing I would do if I were you is to build a crosscut sled for your table saw. This is a 1/2" or 3/4" platform that's full-width (maybe even a little wider) than your saw's tabletop, and it has two slide runners that slide in the grooves on the tabletop. A 2*4 fence on the back edge of the slide that's set exactly 90 degrees to the blade will provide full-length support for your material (no twisting, no kickback). A stop block clamped to the 2*4 fence at the length you want will provide you with an easy way to crosscut several pieces the same length. I built mine to help me with only one project I was building, but since I've built it I've rarely removed it from my saw. The only time it's off is when I have to rip. All crosscuts are on the sled.

        To get a better idea of a crosscut sled, visit the Badger Pond at http://www.wwforum.com/cgi-bin/forum_main/ptools2.cgi, and search the archives for crosscut sleds.
        Greg

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        • #5
          I would have to go along with Greg, only way to go really is a cross-cut sled. I just built one for the same purpose. I went the quick and crude route and it only took less than 1/2. However having said that, when I have finished my current project I plan to build a really good one with an adjustable stop on it. Also they are very easy to be deadly accurate with. Go for it.

          Cheers Ivor in Calgary

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          • #6
            Ivan,
            Just noticed your post.
            I was in a quandry about trying to crosscut a 10" wide x 8' maple board to make a large drawer front. Got pretty frustrated as I was unable to get it perfectly square.

            Finally broke down and purchased the Incra 2000 Miter Gauge. It was like a light coming on. Has a 27" fence and handled the 8' board easily. For shorter cuts (up to 27") it has a stop. Every cut is an exact duplicate of the previous cut using the stop. Don't even have to measure, as a fine tape (very accurate-matches my Starrett) is on the top of the miter gauge.

            I think I paid about $160 for it online.

            rotsa ruck & bee safe

            Rodney J in TX

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            • #7
              rember that a 8' board is really a witch to cut on a table saw without an outfeed support.
              Andy B.

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              • #8
                While I second the motion(s) regarding a cut-off sled (or what Norm calls a "panel cutter", which is the same thing except that the fence leads rather than follows the stock being cut), here is a "down and dirty" for repetitive cross-cuts of some length:

                First, I install an auxilliary fence on my miter gauge. This is important to support the stock being cut, and since mine has a kerf cut through it, it also simplifies setting up the cut length.

                Second, I place a WorkMate to the right of the saw, on which I set my air tools tool box. That tool box is made of plastic, but with contents it weighs a ton and, once set in position, it won't move. I use the tool-box-atop-the-WorkMate as a length stop, making sure that the stock will clear the tool box by at least 6 inches before engaging the blade.

                Third, I move the too-box-atop-the-WorkMate so as to stop at the desired length of cut.

                I then make two cuts on each board. First, I cut off about half an inch on one end, to make the board square. Then I slide it to the right til it touches the tool box and make the second cut. Did this the other day cutting 8 pieces of an odd dimension just over 4 feet. All were identical in length and square-cut on both ends.

                Now you can view this approach two ways. The cost of my air-tools toolbox, with contents, was about $1,000, which is sort of expensive for a cross-cut jig. On the other hand, the cost of my cut-off gauge was zero, since I already owned the tool box and its contents.

                The only real drawback is lifting the damn thing onto the WorkMate.

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