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  • Edge glueing...

    Is "glueing" spelled correctly? [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Anyway, I'm glueing up some quartersawn white oak for a sideboard top. I have 4 pieces that are 65" long to make a 20" wide top. The top is 13/16" thick.

    Do I need biscuits for long grain? I'm hoping to get it as flat as possible to reduce the amount of scraping/sanding once the glue dries. I'm also using a slow-set glue (Gorilla glue) so I don't have to rush the glue-up.

    Thanks,
    Michael

  • #2
    No "e", gluing.

    No, biscuits are not necessary for long grain solid wood joints. In theory, they may fractionally weaken the joint (though so little it would never matter).

    For "as flat as you reasonably can get them" panel glueups (the "e" is back, who makes these stupid rules?), using cauls, straight sticks that you clamp crossgrain, downwards over the entire panel. More of a pain in the neck than biscuits, but better results. Cover the face of the cauls with plastic packing tape so they don't adhere to the glueup, which is a real disaster.

    Dave

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    • #3
      Dave,

      Thanks for the glue-up lesson, as well as the numerous ways to use glue (with and without the "e") in a sentence. [img]smile.gif[/img]

      Should the cauls be curved? I thought I read that this would help distribute the pressure.

      I plan on using lots of pipe clams and smaller clamps to hold the cauls. Is this okay?

      Ever the novice,
      Michael

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      • #4
        I could argue either side of making the cauls convex. Twenty inches isn't very wide, so it isn't imperative. On the other hand, it won't hurt and white oak is so strong that the curve won't harm it (in softer woods, too much curve in a caul can put a depression in the panel).

        Your planned clamp usage sounds fine. The cauls need to be tightened before the pipe clamps are, once the pipe clamps take hold nothing is going to shift those pieces.

        The proper spacing for clamps is determined by drawing 45 degree lines from the clamp heads, and making them overlap. If that doesn't make sense, I could make a picture illustrating it tonight.

        Dave

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        • #5
          Thanks for the tips.

          Let me take a guess at the clamp spacing (look, no "e" [img]smile.gif[/img] )...

          Rough space the clamps and guage a 45 degree line from the clamp heads and, I'm assuming, there should be some overlap in the lines to fully transfer the pressure throughout. Am I close?

          Thanks,
          Michael

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          • #6
            Spot on, I believe. [img]smile.gif[/img] The counter-intuitive part is that narrower boards need more clamps, most people guess opposite.

            Dave

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            • #7
              Ah. I did't know that. Better check my clamp supply.

              Thanks again for all the help.

              Michael

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              • #8
                where can i pick up some of those pipe clams ?maybe they are not available in this part of the country eh
                Irish King

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                • #9
                  Hey Dave,

                  Just curious, what is the origin, or reasoning of the 45 degree rule?
                  Stubert<br />The IGIT without a Forum...

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