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  • Getting a broken screw out ...

    This evening, our rocking chair arm rest broke off from the back of the chair. There was a screw that went from the back side of the chair, through that piece, and into the arm rest. The screw broke off right where it goes into the arm rest, and I have no idea of how to retrieve it from its resting place. Is there a special bit for a driver that will take care of this for me? Or am I just SOL? If so, I thought I might be able to bore out a larger opening to remove the screw and use a dowl, but I don't know if that would be strong enough.

    Any help would be great!
    Protection in the workshop? ... I\'ve got a condom on right now.

  • #2
    Do you have a dremil? Put on a fiber mesh cutting disc and cut a slot in the end of the screw, now you can turn it out with a slot screw driver

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    • #3
      If you can get even a small grip on the threads, try long nosed vise grips.

      dp

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      • #4
        I use a plug cutter and drill out a plug with the screw in it. Then plug the hole with a dowel glued in. When dry you can drill a new pilot hole in the dowel and install the arm
        info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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        • #5
          Thanks for the great ideas so far. I'd try either the Dremil or plug cutter methods if I owned either of them. As for vice grips, I got nothing to grab onto.

          When I have stripped a screw in the past, I have used a straight bit and a hammer to make a grove to use to turn (not as elegant as the Dremel, but it got the job done), but I got nothing to work with here.

          I thought I remember seeing some type of bit you put in your power driver to get this done. The threads go in the opposite direction, so when it digs in, the screw gets turned out. If I'm talking crazy here, let me know. I think that is what I want. I just want the bit name, so I can ask for it at the hardware store.

          Thanks for the new ideas!
          Protection in the workshop? ... I\'ve got a condom on right now.

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          • #6
            I think you might be thinking of whats called an easy out! but your broke screw has to be large enough to drill a hole in the center to insert the bit. then you wrench it out by hand.

            Bob B
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=
            Be safe out there folks
            Bob B
            =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

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            • #7
              There is this style where you need to drill a hole in the screw which may not be easy with a small screw EZ Out style
              When looking for a pic of the EZ out I found these that look pretty useful Screw Extractor

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              • #8
                The screw extractor for use in a power drill is for when the head is stripped out and you can't get a bite with a screw driver.I have a set of them made by Craftsman. WBrooks second link would work the same way as a plug cutter. Plug cutters are cheap and can be picked up at any hardware or home center.
                info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                • #9
                  Careful, guys.

                  An Easy Out is NOT intended to be spun in a power drill. After you have drilled the pilot hole in the screw or bolt shaft, insert the EO in the hole, give it a tap or two with a hammer, and then chuck the end of the EO is a tapping wrench and turn it counter-clockwise, slowly.

                  The things that papadan is talking about are reverse pitched knife-edged tools that are designed to bite into the enlarged conical hole left in a Phillips screw that has been buggered by cam-out. Once again, is not intended to be spun by a power drill. In fact, best use of the Sears product is a drill press, if the size of the workpiece permits, but don't turn the drill press on; use a chuck wrench manually to turn the spindle backwards while using the drill press to maintain downward pressure on the tool.

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                  • #10
                    cheapest option

                    Try and create a flat spot in the center of the screw, by lightly taping the screw with a punch, put a center punch point right into the center of the screw, Take a drill at least 2/3rds smaller than the screw, pay a lot of attention to alignment as you drill through the length of the screw, use as high a speed as you can and soak the drill in WD40, dont force it or twist or bend it just let the drill cut into the screw, until it goes right through to wood, then take another drill the same size as the screw or 1/32 max larger and do the same again, the broken screw disapears and you can install a new one slightly larger or go get a 75c dowl rod from HD and drill the hole larger to accomodate the dowel diameter glue in and then renew the original sized screw. Personally I would plug cut because I have one so I agree completely with Papa on this, but this technique may suit your budget. Good luck
                    Last edited by DHead; 01-07-2006, 02:59 PM.

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                    • #11
                      My money would go on the Plug Cutter

                      I think Papa Dan has the right idea -- that method will give you good control over depth and alignment -- and the solution he offers to remove the screw and a plug together makes sense. If you've never tried using an easy out, or one of those screw removers, they are good to have in your toolbox, too. I'd home that PapaDan's solution would remove enough material to expose the screw. Then, don't mess with the visegrips -- get out your cordless drill and tighten the chuck on the screw -- hit the reverse trigger and out it comes.

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                      • #12
                        I would hope the original poster would have gotten that screw out some time in the last eleven months!!
                        Lorax
                        "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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