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  • OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

    Hello all, as we all know from previous posts of mine, I'm not the sharpest tool in the shed however I do have "potential" (As defined by Potential | Define Potential at Dictionary.com ) possible, as opposed to actual:

    Grin...

    Anyway, I was curious as if anyone knows why to change to power supply from the normal house current of 110 to 220 on my TS2424? I'm only asking because I NOW have a 220 outlet and was making sawdust the other day and it hit me. Well when I woke up and saw the 220 on one side and the the table saw on the other side, I had an idea. It went away as quick as it came to me, but I was thinking about them and figured I would ask... What better place than here ?


    Dan



    BTW - Yes I know it may take a while but once you get it, you STILL won't think it's funny.

  • #2
    Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

    there is little need to, if any,

    in my farm wood shop, I changed most all my machines to 240 volt operation do to the wiring that was first in the building, it was very under sized, and the voltage drop was extreme, by going to 240 the amps that were drawn over the wires was halved and the dimming and and lugging on starting was reduced,

    unless you have a very inadequate wiring set up and your running you equipment OK on 120 volts I would not suggest to change,

    Now if you get more machines and the power requirements are more than the 15 running amps, on 120 volts you may want to consider going to 240 volts, so if you re power your saw with a 20 hp motor , I would suggest switching it out to 240 volts,

    you will pull the same amount of power and pay the same bill with wired on 120 to 240,

    the 240 just presents a more balanced usage of the power from the transformer, In some wiring saturations, (such as my old wiring supply wires, to the wood shop) was helpful, (the wiring has now been changed, when the old yard pole rotted off)

    If you were in a commercial shop and running a number of tools at once the 240 may hold a small advantage to the power system, but most home shops would not have that problem,

    I was curious as if anyone knows why to change to power supply from the normal house current of 110 to 220
    The main reason for you to change over is so your neighbor can not borrow it, and take it to his shop and use it,
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

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    • #3
      Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

      You will see no major performance benefit by changing your saw over to 220V. What you will do however is free up some amps on the circuit you are now hooked up too. While I rarely use two tools at the same time on the same circuit, other considerations could come into play, i.e, lights, fans, etc.
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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      • #4
        Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

        Like has already been said.... primary reason for changing to 220/240 Volts would be if you are close to maxing out the line's ability to handle the amperage draw on the existing circuit. For example, if your particular 120-Volt line was 14-guage wire and you were pulling close to 15 amps and you also wanted to run a secondary tool at the same time.

        By going to 220/240, your amperage draw would basically be cut in half... down to 7 amps (for example); thus, your existing wire guage would have more margin.

        I agree that there would be no real performance gain, unless your 120-Volt amp draw was already being hindered by resistance in a minimum wire guage.

        CWS

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        • #5
          Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

          I have changed both my ts and compressor to 220/240 and noticed that they run quieter. Start up is easier and they do not sound like they are working as hard. Would this because I was drawing almost the max out of my 14-2 15 amp circuit?
          Charles

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          • #6
            Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

            Charles,

            You didn't say what kind of compressor or table saw you are running, but I will presume that both of them are designed and labelled as requiring 15-amp "dedicated" circuits.

            Just one of these motors will require pretty much the full 15-amp load on start-up and probably somewhere near that at heavy load. Together on one circuit, they may well overload or come close to maximizing the capacity of that circuit. The "resistance" (amperage) of the wiring may simply starve the motor to some degree, requiring more strain and heat as it struggles to perform. So YES, a 220-Volt circuit would provide more "juice" and make the motor a lot happier.

            CWS

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            • #7
              Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

              Thank You everyone for your input. I DO honestly appreciate it. As it is now I have a Ridgid RAS, Ridgid TS, and a Ridgid jointer. I also have some of the smaller shop tools as well and a couple of shop fans. Even recently picked up a portable AC unit (even though I haven't really used it all that much yet. ) Texas Heat, it WILL get you... But as everyone seems to agree on, I am only using one tool at a time.

              Anyway that you all again for you posts. I have a tendency of posting questions different ways to see what the "majority' of answers are, and here I get HONEST answers and that's the best...


              Dan

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              • #8
                Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

                This is one of the most highly contested debates on woodworking forums. You might notice some difference by switching to 220v, you might not....it really depends on your circuit and motor. The scenario is different with every 120v circuit and every motor. In theory, there should be no difference, but in real world practice, many 120v circuits don't provide the full amperage demand during peaks for a variety of reasons, so there can be some voltage loss. 220v tends to have less voltage loss and a better ability to provide full amperage at startup and heavy load demands. Voltage loss causes heat in the motor coils. You could actually extend the life of your motor by switching to 220v.

                Since you've got 220v already available and there's no downside in switching, I'd do it...for the cost of a 220v plug (~ $10), you just might notice a difference. If your having no issues and didn't have 220v already installed, I wouldnt bother....but you have it right there! I've switched two of my table saws and noticed a significant difference with one, and a minor difference with the other.
                Last edited by hewood; 07-11-2012, 04:24 PM.

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                • #9
                  Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

                  the only advantage to switching a 2424 from 110 to 220 is that 220 distributes the load more evenly across both phases of the supply panel. the motor developes the same HP in 110 as it does in 220 configuration.
                  there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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                  • #10
                    Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

                    Originally posted by FINER9998 View Post
                    the only advantage to switching a 2424 from 110 to 220 is that 220 distributes the load more evenly across both phases of the supply panel. the motor developes the same HP in 110 as it does in 220 configuration.
                    The theoretical aspect of your statement is true, but to say that it's the "only" advantage is an oversimplification that doesn't acknowledge the possibility of getting the noticeable benefits that many observe, like faster startups and faster recovery from bogging due to the numerous common shortcomings found in many residential 120v circuits. I'd hate for someone who already has the 220v line available to be convinced not to ever try switching their saw to 220v because they've read there's no difference. I'm aware of the theoretical discussions that a proper 120v circuit should achieve the same thing, and it's possible that his 120v circuit has not issues, but many do (and don't know it), and he's already got the 220v line available, so why not try it? It'd cost him ~ $10 and 10 minutes for a very reasonable chance that the saw would have noticeably faster startups and faster recovery (which actually makes the saw seem more powerful when cutting) .... many have indeed experienced exactly that when they switched their saws. That's a big green light IMHO. If he didn't have the 220v line already installed, I'd agree that it'd take a noticeable problem with his 120v circuit before bothering to install the 220v line.
                    Last edited by hewood; 07-12-2012, 08:09 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

                      When I only had 120v I ran one piece of equipment at a time. My table saw is a Rigid 4511 and the compressor is a duel voltage Emglow contractors wheelbarrow compressor. When I had my heat pump installed I had the electrician install a 30 amp 220/240v plug above the workbench below the panel and a 20 amp 120v next to it, both on their own breakers. If needed I even have a 8/3 50' extension cord to use. Both the ts and compressor run a lot better on 220/240. I do suspect it is because of the length of the old 15 amp run for that circuit. I think it was about 65'.
                      Charles

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                      • #12
                        Re: OLD TS2424 110 to 220 ? WHY ?

                        Originally posted by hewood View Post
                        The theoretical aspect of your statement is true, but to say that it's the "only" advantage is an oversimplification that doesn't acknowledge the possibility of getting the noticeable benefits that many observe, like faster startups and faster recovery from bogging due to the numerous common shortcomings found in many residential 120v circuits. I'd hate for someone who already has the 220v line available to be convinced not to ever try switching their saw to 220v because they've read there's no difference. I'm aware of the theoretical discussions that a proper 120v circuit should achieve the same thing, and it's possible that his 120v circuit has not issues, but many do (and don't know it), and he's already got the 220v line available, so why not try it? It'd cost him ~ $10 and 10 minutes for a very reasonable chance that the saw would have noticeably faster startups and faster recovery (which actually makes the saw seem more powerful when cutting) .... many have indeed experienced exactly that when they switched their saws. That's a big green light IMHO. If he didn't have the 220v line already installed, I'd agree that it'd take a noticeable problem with his 120v circuit before bothering to install the 220v line.
                        and the reason those "benefits", as you've termed them, are realized is because of the more efficient distribution of power attendant with 220v wiring, which is what i originally posted. but do not confuse the perception of faster start up with increased hp. the motor can only develope it's rated hp and the motor on the 2424 developes the same hp in both 110v and 220v configurations. some dual voltage motors are wired to develope more hp at 220v, but the motor on the 2424 isn't one of them.
                        there's a solution to every problem.....you just have to be willing to find it.

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