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220 and TS3612

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  • #31
    Solution: Conduit and spooled strand wire.

    In my opinion, that is really the way to go. Wrestle one stinking 10/2 NMS (Romax) run, then run the same in THHN (stranded). No comparison, THHN is a beauty.

    and no Ridgid, or any other machine on 110 pulls more than 15 amps.

    Woody, as a general comment that ain't so. To pick a spectacular example, Grizzly sells the G1023S110, a 110 volt version of their cabinet saw. This baby's motor is rated at a spectacular 24 amps. What you bet it doesn't come with a 30 amp NEMA 5-30P plug installed?

    What you probably intended to write is that no UL-listed 110 volt equipment draws over 15 amps.

    Any breaker is tripped by a dead short. It's the overload conditions that require proper sizing of the breaker.

    Dave

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    • #32
      Good Post. Very informative.

      I just got done wiring my garage. It is also finished walls but went the 1" conduit route with 12/2 wg. I ran a 60 amp breaker to a 100amp(6 slot) subfeed box using #3 cable and have 4 110/20 circuits out of the box. Each circuit has a 20amp GFCI as the first receptical followed by 20amp standard recepticals. When I decide to use 240 I will scrap 2 of the 110's and have 2/110 and 2/220. Do any of you have any misgivings for this setup? I plan to have 1 220 dedicated to a dust collector, and run only 1 tool at a time.

      When you convert you tools to 220 do you replace your 12/2 with 12/3? Looking at the manual you have 220 3 blade recepticle, I alway thought that you had to have black,red,white and ground is this not so?

      THanks for any help!

      Bucko

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      • #33
        Thanks Dave,

        I'm not good at saying what I mean at times. Heck, if it weren't for drafting, shop and PH, I would have dropped out of high school. My Inglish sucks.
        John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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        • #34
          Bucko, your setup looks decent to me. I didn't look up if #3 is good for 60 amp, but I assume you did. If you had asked me ahead of time the only change I would have suggested would be to use a load center with more breaker capacity, so's you wouldn't have to decommission 120s to put in 240s.

          You only need separate ground and neutral on 240v if the connected appliance has a 120v load also. Typical example is an electric/electronic range or oven, where the elements are 240v and the electronics run from 120v. All the small shop tools I am familiar with are pure 240v. If I remember correctly, this is an addition from either the 1999 or 2002 NEC, you'll see a lot of older installations of split voltage loads on xx/2.

          Dave

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          • #35
            To all;

            Yes I know that the power company bills by watts and not amps, I just was trying not to explain the entire process of how we determine if we're actually saving money or not when converting to 220/240 volt operation so I took a little short cut. I think as the subject has ran along everyone understands that in the end you will not save much money but your power tool will run better, so with that I will leave the rest alone. However I am a little surprised that no one has questioned how the motor can be dual voltage, and yet the RPM' don't change, and the current draw stays the same. I will not even attempt to explain how this works, cause I know I will get it wrong.

            Dave
            It\'s not the quantity or quality of your tools that matters....<br />It\'s all in the firewood that\'s left over.....

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            • #36
              Heck, I could care less about the electric bill. Or even how the moter can run on both currents with the same rpm. RESULTS and PERFORMANCE, is the key words.

              I have enough to do, I'll leave the technical stuff to Emerson, and enjoy their accomplishments.

              It would be nice to have the knowledge. But as GrandPa always told me. No one can know everything. Just know about what you do, and what you need to do it with, and leave the rest to the service centers. [img]smile.gif[/img]
              John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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              • #37
                DCH,
                I think it boils down to this. On 110 you are running near the limits of the wire, breakers and plugs all the time. With 220 you are only at half the rating. Some one said its like running your car full out all the time. That can't be good.

                Bucko

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