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turning small diameter spindles

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  • turning small diameter spindles

    I am having trouble turning small-diameter spindles for a chair project (I keep breaking them). I'd appreciate suggestions for methods or auxiliary tools to help me successfully master this technique.

    Thanks

    ------------------
    Tony White
    Tony White

  • #2
    I'm guessing the spindles are fairly long and that when you are cutting toward the center is when they are breaking. I also imagine you are getting quite a bit of chatter between the chisel and the stock.
    When cutting long thin pieces on the lathe you may need a center work support. There are several that are availible from aftermarket sources or you can make one your self.
    Basicly a work support is 3 bearings that can be adjusted around a work piece, near the center to help support it and prevent chatter.

    Jake

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    • #3
      Two tips to solve this issue
      1. SHARP tools. Dull tools require too much pressure to cut and you force the tool and probably get a catch.
      2. Don't use much pressure on the tailstock. This bows the spindle and creates a whipping effect which grows and eventually snaps the spindle.
      I regularly turn small dia. stock and if I obey my own advice, no problems. Keep spinning that wood.

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      • #4
        I built a steady rest and have had good success. I also take note of your advice and thank you very much.

        <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by hamhand:
        Two tips to solve this issue
        1. SHARP tools. Dull tools require too much pressure to cut and you force the tool and probably get a catch.
        2. Don't use much pressure on the tailstock. This bows the spindle and creates a whipping effect which grows and eventually snaps the spindle.
        I regularly turn small dia. stock and if I obey my own advice, no problems. Keep spinning that wood.
        <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

        Tony White

        Comment


        • #5
          I found a steady rest plan on the Internet and it solved my problem nicely. It used three rollerblade wheels and bearings which were adjustable within a 3/4" plywood ring which was supported on the lathe bed and surrounded the workpiece. Cost: about $20. Quite nice. thanks for the suggestion.

          <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by whitet:
          I am having trouble turning small-diameter spindles for a chair project (I keep breaking them). I'd appreciate suggestions for methods or auxiliary tools to help me successfully master this technique.

          Thanks
          <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

          Tony White

          Comment

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