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  • Joiner How do you use it?

    first of many questions I will have [img]redface.gif[/img]

    I have a Sears 6" joiner I received used. Sounds like the same joiner (Rick Leet was looking for a guard a few posts back). Anyway, I am having trouble getting a even face on the ends of the boards I try to join. Some time it works real good, but most of the time it will not be flush with the board it will be glued to. I'm pretty sure I need to replace the blades and will most likly tonight. But, im not sure if I am using the joiner correctly.

    My question is. What is the technique in using the joiner? Do you but pressure on the back of the board before it goes over the plades, on the front after the blades, or just keep it against the fence as you bush it throught the blades?

    My woodworking terminology is very limited. What I mean by joining and not being flush, is by taking two boards and gluing them the make one wider board with a noticeable gap (mainly in the middel of the glue line)is visible.
    DougH<br /><br />Proud to Serve

  • #2
    Hi, Doug. It's best to keep the piece firmly up against the fence throughout the entire operation. Now once you get the board started over the blades and onto the outfeed table, maintain constant downward pressure on the outfeed table side of things as you feed the remainder of the board through (taking care to use pushblocks and not place your hands directly over the position of the blades). It's sounds to me as if you may be rocking back and forth and are alternately placing downward pressure on both the infeed and outfeed tables as the board passes over the jointer. When pressing down on the infeed side, this will cause the board to rise up slightly off of the outfeed table resulting in the loss of a true edge (and will cause the gap you are seeing).
    Jim

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    • #3
      hello and welcome

      yes, the jointer took me a little while to get the hang of as well but once i did, i love it. first thing is to make sure your blades are sharp and even. next make sure they are aligned properly (this was my biggest problem). third, you need not take of a lot of wood per pass. i keep mine set between 1/16th and 1/8th of an inch, rip my stock accordingly, and turn out some nice work!

      you dont need a lot of pressure, just keep your stock flush to the fence and infeed table, feed slowly and let the blades do the rest. you might need to make 2 or 3 passes...depending on the stock and how accurate your rip is, but it is well worth it!
      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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      • #4
        The thing I've found from reading the posts on this jointer, is make sure the outfeed table and the infeed tables are adjusted, New blades can be found at(choke) Sears or the blades from a Ridgid will work(Emerson Built). Dave A. can give you more info on the blades than I can, though. My outfeed table was low and it made a low area on the end of the cut(approx.2 inches)

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        • #5
          The thing I've found from reading the posts on this jointer, is make sure the outfeed table and the infeed tables are adjusted, New blades can be found at(choke) Sears or the blades from a Ridgid will work(Emerson Built). Dave A. can give you more info on the blades than I can, though. My outfeed table was low and it made a low area on the end of the cut(approx.2 inches long)

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          • #6
            Thanks for the help, will have to look at HD for the blades, I personally don't want to go to Sears unless Its the last hope. One add on question, Does the direction of the grain make a difference?
            DougH<br /><br />Proud to Serve

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            • #7
              Direction of grain makes a big difference, but not to the problem you're having. For that matter, how sharp the blades are makes no difference to the problem you are having either.

              Jointers are a pain in the behind to learn how to use. Technique is everything on this machine, assuming it is set up correctly.

              A good size board to begin practising with is one that will fit entirely on the infeed table. Then move to one about twice that length. Heed the advice about never placing pressure over the cutterhead. This not only can mess up the cut, but if the board kicks back (and it can), or you slip, the jointer doesn't leave any pieces large enough for a Surgeon to reattach.

              Dave
              (oh, correct grain direction is thus:

              \\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\ <- board travels left)

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              • #8
                HD does not stock the blades for the jointer. at least they didnt when i needed a set. sears does
                \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                • #9
                  Thank you all for all of your replies, As Dave mentioned the blades were not the only problem. After many long searches on Google’s I was able to figure out that the infeed table was out of alignment. Fixed that, but in new blades and did my best to align them. I was able to get a perfect joint after a few passes on the jointer.

                  Dave, I will take your advice and start working my way up to longer boards

                  Thanks All
                  Doug
                  DougH<br /><br />Proud to Serve

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                  • #10
                    Any comments good or bad about the ridgid jointer? thanks
                    \"Aarrgh, sliver me timbers\"<br /><a href=\"http://www.picturetrail.com/daviddunlap\" target=\"_blank\">www.picturetrail.com/daviddunlap</a>

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                    • #11
                      I have the ridgid jointer and it's a very good machine!
                      Andy B.

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