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  • Squareing prob

    I have checked my 3650 every which way from tuesday. I cut a 3/4" MDF to 35"X 19". I actually cut it to 36"X 20" and then turned and cut the factory side off reducing to 35" X 19". The 2 cuts are out of square. Why is that? The rest of the Cabinet is squared real nice but the doors turned out diamond shaped. I mean a real small amount, but enough that it bugs me.

    It's like a 1/16th of an inch out of square at 35". I know it isn't much, but if I make some 6' cabinets, then what? An 1/8th inch out? Like to fix the prob now if I can.

  • #2
    If you used the fence to cut both edges that are 90 degrees from each other, any number of things can cause this. A sliver or fiber sticking out from one edge.

    To properly square stock is to cut on side using the fence. Then use a cross cut sled with the freshly cut edge to the back of the sled. This will give you your perfect 90 degree angle providing the sled is accurate and the saw is not out of alignment.

    From there, you can use the fence to cut the remaining 2 sides. Never assume a factory cut is square. Most cases it's real close.
    John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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    • #3
      That makes perfect sense. I need to make some kind of fence for my sled. Are there any aftermarket products or tips you could give me?

      After I cut this board to 36" X 20", it's hard to get it squared on my 5" sled. I cut a peice of 3/4" MDF to 2" X 35" but it isn't sturdy enough to stay straight all the way out. It bows back. Plus, the end of the table is 10" from the blade, so to use the sled, it hangs 10" off the table. Kind of a bummer.

      I need a table extention or something.

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      • #4
        For a cross cut sled, I use the Delta 36-205 Miter Sled.



        http://www.deltawoodworking.com/index.asp?e=139&p=2422
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        www.mnpatriotguard.org
        www.patriotguard.org

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        • #5
          Paizan,
          Are you using your stock miter gage ("5 inch sled") to make these cuts? If so you did a fantastic job getting as close as you did. What you need is a crosscut sled or a panel cutting sled. Do a search for these items here and/or on google. There are lots of free plans out there for these jigs. Also, the Jan 04 issue of Popular Woodworking is devoted to fixtures, jigs and tips. I just picked up a copy at Wal-mart today.
          If I am mistaken assuming that you were referring to the miter gage as a 5" sled, I apologize.
          Lorax
          "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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          • #6
            Yeah, 5" sled. I went and got a router flush bit and squared the 2 sides and then routed the top and bottom flush, then Sanded a little, and put a 1/4" round, around the edges. Today comes paint.

            Heres the pics of how out of square I am talking about.

            http://groups.msn.com/VegasRincon2/wood.msnw?Page=1

            Thanx for the tips.

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            • #7
              First thing you have to do is make sure your square is square...for years I had a problem when ever I used my 12" speedy square to lay out something it never came out right...I than started checking all my squares and found most if not all were out of square...

              Funny now my stuff comes out much better!!!

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              • #8
                That is a very good point rrmcbride. Very few low cost squares of any kind are exact. A simple test is to take a know perfectly straight edge and run a line with the square. Flip the square over and on the other side of the line. If they don't match up, the square is not square.

                I found this so to be true in trying to square my RAS. I found it neccessary to make a jig, based on the flipped square technique to actually get the saw to cut a perfect 90 degrees to the fence.
                John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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                • #9
                  Tools take a lot of abuse, and the Carpenter's Framing Square can be knocked out of square by dropping it or dropping something on it. After you confirm that it is out of square using Woody's method, you can true it up using the following technique:
                  Draw a pencil line diagonally between the inside right angle and the outside right angle.
                  If the square is reading less than 90°, take a pin punch and place the tip of the punch on the line towards the inside corner. Tap the punch, which spreads the metal on the inside and increases the angle.
                  If the square is reading more than 90°, take a pin punch and place the tip of the punch on the line towards the outside corner. Tap the punch, which spreads the metal on the outside and decreases the angle.

                  [ 12-21-2003, 11:39 PM: Message edited by: Deblieux ]
                  If it don\'t fit, force it. If it breaks, \'needed fixin\' anyhow. 8{~

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                  • #10
                    That's some great info. Thanx.

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                    • #11
                      Edited the proceedure for truing a Framing Square. I failed to preview the post and some of the information was missing. The proceedure is:
                      After you confirm that it is out of square using Woody's method, true it up using the following technique:
                      Draw a pencil line diagonally between the inside right angle and the outside right angle.
                      If the square is reading less than 90°, take a pin punch and place the tip of the punch on the line towards the inside corner. Tap the punch, which spreads the metal on the inside and increases the angle.
                      If the square is reading more than 90°, take a pin punch and place the tip of the punch on the line towards the outside corner. Tap the punch, which spreads the metal on the outside and decreases the angle.
                      If it don\'t fit, force it. If it breaks, \'needed fixin\' anyhow. 8{~

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