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  • one last crosscut sled question

    After taking all of your input and looking at some different plans, i am ready to go. I picked up a piece of melamine at the local HD precut perfect fit. wil be using oak or possibly walnut for the runners (until i can get some polycarb).

    Now i have seen several plans, some show the front and back of the sled to be mounted to the top of the sled, others show them to be mounted to the actual front and back. Does this make a big difference? I was actually thinking of cutting a 3/4" rabbit about half way down the melamine and mounting the front and back in the rabbit. More glue area and more room for screws.

    What's the consensous?
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

  • #2
    Everything you always wanted to know about crosscut sleds but were afraid to ask.

    http://benchmark.20m.com/articles/Cr...ledArticle.pdf
    Lorax
    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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    • #3
      Lorax

      Thank for the share of info, This is Most Helpuful.

      Thanks so much
      \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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      • #4
        I've always glued/screwed to the front and back edges of the board, not on top. Contrary to the advice in the above mentioned article, I find that I alway use the front of the sled to hold my work, so the front needs to be at a perfect 90 degrees to the blade, not the back, as the article states. I also find that 45 degree and other templates and clamps for the sled work better and are less out of the way if mounted to the front. But, then again, I may just be perverse....
        Nolo illigitamati carborundum

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        • #5
          Thanks again for the info. I have looked at a lot of plans, articles, etc and I only have ONE unresolved problem. It is obviously important that the sled is square to the blade, in addition the runners have to be perfectly parallel to run freely and not bind. I chose a 3/4" piece of melamine for my sled and will be using oak for the front, back and rails. Here is how I planned on fastening the runners to the sled to ensure they are parallel, perfectly spaced and glide smoothly. Set the runners in the miter gague slots of the saw. Put a light coat of glue on the runners. Then set the melamine on the table saw and set it so that it is centered on the table and square to the table/miter guides and clamp it. At this point use the finishing nailer with a 1 1/4" nails to to tack it in place, sinking the nails with a nail set if necessary. Then flip the thing over and use a #4 counter sink and #4X1/4 to secure the runners, and then wipe up the squeeze out.

          This seems like the best way to do this. Then add the front and back again with some glue and a #6 countersink from underneath to secure the oak. I also thought about cutting a shallow rabbit with the dado on both sides and using biscuits, two each side of center, possibly toe nailing some finishing nails as well?

          The article is not specific on the best way to mount those runners (unless I missed it), And I can not find a plan that shows a fool proof way to do this either.

          Any and all feedback good or bad would be greatly appreciated.

          Thanks
          \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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          • #6
            I use Glue and Screws to mount the rails, BUT I use 3/4" birch or Oak ply, NOT particle board. You can do it just have to be carful handling the sled, Bump something and could knock the rails off.

            [ 05-09-2005, 07:57 PM: Message edited by: papadan ]
            info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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            • #7
              Yeah i figured glue and screws, and i have a counter sink drill bit, my dilema is do you screw the rails down, or do you screw into the top of the sled and screw the rails up? I figured some glue and a finishing nail at one end, square it up and tack it at the other end, then screw it tight, just not sure which way is the best to go.

              thanks
              \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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              • #8
                I screw up through the rails into the bed. That is why I was warning about the particle board, it wont hold screws very well. Another little trick I do is make the rails/runners about 6" longer than the sled. My TS is small and I can start the sled off the table with the longer runners. MAXW, screwing into the front and rear edges is fine if you are using hardwood for the bed, not recommoended if the bed is plywood. Ply wont hold a screw into the edge fo long and the glue wont help much either.IMHO

                [ 05-14-2005, 11:43 AM: Message edited by: papadan ]
                info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                • #9
                  If using plywood (or melamine) and mounting to the front/back of the sled, I would use biscuits and screws.

                  As for the runners....Will likely use epoxy on the surfaces AND in the screw holes. Will have to square it up quick that is the only problem with epoxy. I guess quick tack wood glue would be fine and epoxy on the screws would work well too.
                  \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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                  • #10
                    I made my sled out of MDO (Medium Density Overlay.) This is the same material that they use to make road signs. It is very stable and last a loooooong time. The runner is made from quarter-sawn red oak.

                    I cut a 1/4" dado in the bottom of the sled to secure the runner firmly to the sled and my fence (also made of MDO) is attached to the top front edge of the sled and is held in place with counter-sunk (top & bottom) 1 1/4" carriage bolts washers and lock nuts.

                    Personally, I would never attach or use a sled with the fence attached to the rear. If you ever had a piece of wood that moved or got bound up while pushing it through the blade, you could have a serious problem.

                    Any of the commercially made sleds I've seen have the fence attached to the top front. But like anything else, it's a matter of personal preference.

                    "Been using it for 14 years now with no problems!"

                    [ 06-25-2005, 10:00 AM: Message edited by: CARPENTERDON ]
                    Dimensional Carpentry & Custom Woodworking
                    Historic Renovations, Restoration, & Custom Log Homes


                    I Beat The Competition Hammersdown!

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