Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

Table saw rip fence problem

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Table saw rip fence problem

    Table saw rip fence problem

    I received a TS2424 table saw for Christmas (does my wife love me or what?) and I am just tickled pink. However, I have run into a problem with the rip fence that has me completely baffled. I will try to explain the problem clearly in hopes that someone can help. Here goes.

    I discovered today that my fence gets out of square when I move it to the right and beyond the main table (over the wing). I checked and re-checked the alignment at the right miter slot just as directed in the user manual. It’s as perfect as I can get it. I can move the fence so the center is over the main table, lock it and it stays square with the miter slot. If I move the fence right a couple more inches so it is over the wing, the measurement at the back of the fence gets shorter.

    I checked the table and found that my right wing was not square with the main table (or with itself) so I have shimmed the wing a full 3/32 at the rear (pretty ugly). I placed a straight edge across the front of the table above the fence rail and both wings and table are flush. I checked the rear of the table also and it looks good. I tightened things back up and re-checked my fence alignment. Then I tested for square at different widths and things are a little better but I still have a problem. At seven inches right of the miter slot, I am loosing a full 1/32 of an inch from front to back. When I move the fence out to 20 inches or so I am 1/16 out of square!

    I have checked the left side of the saw and I have no problems. Any ideas??

    Thanks
    Greg

  • #2
    Greg, with what and how are you measuring the out of square or non parallel fence. I assume that you have adjusted the 4 screws on each side of the locking handle and adjusted the tension nut for the rear rail lockdown? Is the amount you are off in the dimensions you mentioned away from the miter slot consistant or does it vary. I've been looking at mine and trying to visualize what you are saying. Give us some more info and we'll try to help.
    Dick

    Comment


    • #3
      I think I might understand the problem. You wrote

      "I checked the table and found that my right wing was not square with the main table (or with itself)"

      Let me rephrase that. When directly mounted to the main table, the front edge of the main table and the front edge of the extension form an angle.

      If so, you have a bad extension, have it replaced. The angle is pulling the guide rail for the fence out of alignment, this is causing your problem.

      As I think of it, this could be a bad main table. Measure the angle between the front of the main table and the right side. It should be 90.

      Dave

      Comment


      • #4
        <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dave Arbuckle:
        I think I might understand the problem. You wrote

        "I checked the table and found that my right wing was not square with the main table (or with itself)"

        Let me rephrase that. When directly mounted to the main table, the front edge of the main table and the front edge of the extension form an angle.

        If so, you have a bad extension, have it replaced. The angle is pulling the guide rail for the fence out of alignment, this is causing your problem.

        As I think of it, this could be a bad main table. Measure the angle between the front of the main table and the right side. It should be 90.

        Dave
        <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

        Dick,

        I knew things were headed in this direction. I have disassembled my table. I have checked square on the main table and it appears to be square (might be out 1/64” or so). I checked my “right” extension wing and it is definitely out of square, maybe as much as 1/16” in 27”. I checked my “left” extension wing and it looks like it may be out of square a little. I am going to get a machinist friend of mine to double-check what I suspect. What will be my best course of action to get the part(s) replaced. Should I just take the whole saw back to HD and get a new one??

        Thanks,
        Greg
        Greg

        Comment


        • #5
          Greg, wait till Monday when Jake Schnarre (moderator) is back. If he doesn't answer you on the forum, send him an e-mail. From what I have seen on this forum, Ridgid will take care of your problem or advise you how to solve it. Their customer service is great. If I were you I think I'd opt for a new wing. Those saws are a little heavy to tote around. Give Jake a shot before you do anything.
          Dick

          Comment


          • #6
            Also, you might find it just as easy to call Ridgid customer service. 1-800-4RIDGID, if I recall correctly.

            By the way, he's Dick, I've Dave.

            Dave

            Comment


            • #7
              For Dick and Dave...
              First off, sorry about crossing the names. Thank you both for your input, it has helped a lot. I will wait to see if Jake has anything to say and then I will persue obtaining a new wing. I re-assembled my saw using my good wing on the right and it setup just OK.

              Thanks again.
              Greg

              Comment


              • #8
                Sounds like you guys figured the problem out. The extension for some reason was not cut square. I would imagine it is a parallelagram which in turn is pulling the fence out of wack when you bolt the rails down. Greg, drop me an email with your addy and phone # and I will get an extension out to you.

                Jake

                Comment


                • #9
                  Im new and just read the posts & replies.

                  The only gripe I have about my saw is the goofy cheap fence that comes with it and the 3/16 lip for a 0 tolerance insert.

                  I got tired of my fence collecting dust & chips and having to blow it off. I bought a better rip fence (a B/M aftermarket) I can state that I have no problems at all now.

                  How can an outfit like Ridgid put such a piece of crap on a quality table saw is beyond me.

                  OT: I also made a dust chute for the bottom to hook up my 6 horse Ridgid Vac. This is nice.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by BC:
                    The only gripe I have about my saw is the goofy cheap fence that comes with it <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                    BC,

                    I'd like to hear what sort of problem you had with your fence. It concerns me because we regularly receive good reviews and a high level of customer praise for our fence. If there is something paticular that was wrong please let me know so I can address it.

                    Jake

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I fully expect that someday I'll be proficient enough about table saws that I'll be qualified to enter a discussion about the pros and cons of different rip fences and do it intelligently. I ain't there yet, so I'll just offer this observation: I do a lot of cuts that, I suspect, pose more of a test for a fence than others, specifically, small two-step rabbets and rips of very narrow strips from 3 to 4 foot long boards in preparation for edge-jointing (a form of poor man's jointing). I spent a good deal of time reading the instructions with the 2424, and I took the fence apart in order to understand its theory of operation, and I'm fairly careful (read: slow) in doing my set ups. If the fence weren't reliable, I'd expect it to show up in my small rabbets and slices. Thus far, every cut has been perfect. So much so, Jake, that I've postponed the purchase of a jointer because I can really make impossible-to-spot joints using my 2424 as a jointer.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        <BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by RGad:
                        So much so, Jake, that I've postponed the purchase of a jointer because I can really make impossible-to-spot joints using my 2424 as a jointer.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

                        You know I should be sad to hear that since I'm almost sure you'd purchase a RIDGID jointer too. [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img] [img]tongue.gif[/img]

                        [ 03-05-2002: Message edited by: JSchnarre ]

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Here you go Jake,
                          Put a 6" cutter head / 10" blade in the next version of the TS2424 so a guy can joint and cut... Just kidding...
                          Regards,<br /><br />Big Johnson<br /><br />Pictures: <a href=\"http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php\" target=\"_blank\">http://www.woodworkersweb.com/modules.php?set_albumName=albuv85&op=modload&name= gallery&file=index&include=view_album.php</a>

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Jake: Yup. However, I'll get there eventually.

                            I must say that the first time I set out to make a table top from edge-glued boards, I spent a lot of time trying to figure out how I'd get a good edge without a jointer. One thought was a straight-edge bit in the router with a straight-edge guide, but you only get perfectly straight router cuts on television (NYW, to be precise). Then I considered my power planer, which is a neat tool, but I had my doubts I could hold it square enough, even with a fence. The whole issue became moot when, after ripping 1/4 inch from both edges of a couple of boards, I laid them out on the table and found they mated perfectly on just a press fit.

                            Then, of course, I figured my experience was a fluke, and I'd never get it as good again, but that wasn't so. I've done this half a dozen times now since the first of the year and always with the same results. Good saw.

                            Now, it remains true that a tool must be had for the same reason that Mt. Everest must be climbed, so don't fret too hard.

                            Bob Gad

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              All I have to say about the fence on my 2412 is ones I set it up I have cut, cut and cut some more.Great fence for me at a perfect 90 degree EVERY time. I am into furniture work. I have thought about a "new fence" reading some of the mfg. stories on how great they are but why spend the bucks whien what you have is doing the job. I'll give RIDGID 5 stars for it....dd [img]tongue.gif[/img]

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X