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  • Setting up Shop

    I would like to set up a woodworking shop to turn wood (small projects: salt & pepper mills, vases, bowls, etc.). What I want to know is:

    1. What power tools are essential?
    2. What power tools are nice to have?
    3. What power tools would be really cool?
    4. What other tools/accessories would I need to consider?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Re: Setting up Shop

    a Lathe would be essential, a good set of lathe chisels,

    some type of saw is needed, as to what kind is debatable, as one could do it all with a hand saw, or saws,
    for small projects, a person can do a lot with a good band saw, (not a mini one but a good shop type unit), for lathe work and money was tight and space was tight and turning was my desire, my lathe and a band saw would do me allot (probably a skill type saw for sawing to length, could be very nice, but many times it is nice for bowls to rough cut the blanks so there is not that much wast wood to remove and some times one can rough out the blank with the band saw and make it fit the lathe where if it had corners on it it would hit the bed, before it got round,

    normally the table saw is considered the Heart of the wood shop,
    (but you can not cut a circle easily on a table saw),

    the big problem is if you want to do glue ups, a band saw is not the best, a table saw (IMO) is more for RIPPING, Yes one can cross cut on it, but not ideal.
    A miter saw or radial arm saw is better for cross cutting. but I would recommend a miter saw over a radial arm saw

    one can with a work bench use a hand plane to make up glue joints, but a jointer, is the power tool for making up glue joints,

    other tools drill, bits, screw drivers, measuring tools,

    If you like wood working in time you will want a table saw, power miter saw, band saw, sanders, lathe, routers, bits drills and drill press,
    (you will most of the tool corral at the box store),

    I would suggest getting a small lathe some thing like a sears or Ridgid , (there not the best but not the worst either) used lathe (cheap) and learn on it and deside if you like the turning enoght to invest in a good heavy lathe that one can out board turn, with and so on, and then you may consider a mini lathe that is more for very fine work like pens and smaller turnings,

    I am not fond of multiple use tools like a shop smith, to much time to change it and really not that solid of a machine, they do have a place, (but I do not think there price is justifiable, at least new),

    I tink one would do better with some bench top tools than a muli tool,

    weight in a stationary tool is normaly a very good thing,

    but start small and then buy what you need, there is no sence you buying a shop and then discover that you really did not need it or use it,


    I hope I have made some sence to you,
    Last edited by BHD; 11-13-2012, 08:01 PM.
    Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
    attributed to Samuel Johnson
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Setting up Shop

      I don't do any turning myself so I'm sure that I will leave out something but to start your wish list I'd say you'll need;

      Lathe and a basic turning tool set
      bandsaw
      drill press
      face shield
      broom and a big dust pan
      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Setting up Shop

        I am not a wood turner either, but there are many turners on Woodworking Forum - Wood Talk Online. Head on over and make a post in the turners area.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Setting up Shop

          Not to pry..but what is your proposed budget?
          That will delineate what your shop will be regarding power tools.

          How much room do you have? Is it going to be a dedicated shop or will you be sharing it
          with an automobile?

          What do you have for power [240vac, 120vac] availability?
          What do you have for lighting ?
          How much room height do you have? it's awkward moving long lumber in a low ceiling.

          What is your skill level? If you're starting from scratch, congratulations and welcome to an
          exciting hobby/career.

          You may want to visit some specialty wood working stores like Rockler, or Wood worker's source etc.
          They often offer training classes and after you take their classes offer discounts on products aka tools!

          Some of the better wood working magazines even offer design ideas for one man wood work shops
          "Wood magazine" comes to mind but there are a myriad of magazines..you may want to visit a library or
          hang out at the magazine section at the grocery store.

          Good luck and keep us informed as there are many experienced folks here on the reflector.

          Cactus man

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Setting up Shop

            one more thing you will probably want a grinder, or sander, to sharpen tools with,

            I would recommend a 6" grinder, and buffing wheels, If you choose to keep a grinding wheel on it keep a water cup handy, and the other side a buffer wheel, and some polishing compound to finish up the edge, (hone it), if the chisels come sharp, then you will not need to grind, putting a sheet of sand paper 300 or 400 grit, on a glass pane, and hand sharpen, the way to go, or (on a oil or water stone),

            If you need to shape the chisel and use a grinding wheel,
            keep it cool, if you discolor the steel turn it yellow or blue from heat you have taken the temper out of the steel and basically ruined the tip of the chisel,


            the buffer wheel and polishing compound is the way to hone it up very nice and sharp,

            Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
            attributed to Samuel Johnson
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
            PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Setting up Shop

              Thanks for the info! This is a good place to start.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Setting up Shop

                Thanks for pointing me in that direction!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Setting up Shop

                  Believe it or not, I don't really have a budget. I am planning on building/buying the size of shed I need (based on the equipment I will eventually put in to it). So, I can have whatever power, lights, etc. that I want. I'm a beginner at turning, but really love it (lots of experience with general handyman stuff). Good way to work out stress and create some nice things for the house and gifts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Setting up Shop

                    I like the pictures! They are very helpful. This is the one area that I'm not comfortable with. I'm sure that I will go through a few tools before I get the hang of sharpening them.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Setting up Shop

                      Originally posted by lnriley View Post
                      Believe it or not, I don't really have a budget. I am planning on building/buying the size of shed I need (based on the equipment I will eventually put in to it). So, I can have whatever power, lights, etc. that I want. I'm a beginner at turning, but really love it (lots of experience with general handyman stuff). Good way to work out stress and create some nice things for the house and gifts.
                      One point that is almost a given, whatever size shed you think you'll need right now, you will out grow it in a very short time. Think BIG!
                      Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Setting up Shop

                        your shed should be about 40 feet x 80 feet so you can get all the tools you will eventual want to get, and still have room to work,

                        there is this rule if you have the room you will fill it, so do not cut your self short, on to small of a shed starting out,

                        wood working is very addictive activity,
                        Push sticks/blocks Save Fingers
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        "The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good."
                        attributed to Samuel Johnson
                        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                        PUBLIC NOTICE: Due to recent budget cuts, the rising cost of electricity, gas, and oil...plus the current state of the economy............the light at the end of the tunnel, has been turned off.

                        Comment

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