Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse
No announcement yet.

nailers

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • nailers

    I have been doing some projects, and am looking for a nailing solution. I'm sure there isn't one perfect tool for my use, so I'm looking for the most versatile. I plan on replacing a bunch of moulding, I make some small structures for my sons train set that are a challenge to clamp while glue sets (thin wood, odd angles), and I make some 1x_ and 2x_ framed furniture/ playsets/ etc where it would sure be handy to tack something up before I screw it. Usually the 2x_ isn't so bad and can be easily clamped/screwed. I have a compressor in my sights, but I would prefer a cordless tool, particularly if it will accept an air chuck. What kind of options do I have?

  • #2
    PC has a combination cordless/air nailer.

    Comment


    • #3
      yeah, but one thing I'm confused on is the difference between finish nails and brads. Do finish nails have no head? Do nailers typically accept only one size nail, or are there brad nailers that take a small range of sizes? I'm almost completely ignorant in this area.

      Comment


      • #4
        PC has two combo kits---a finish and a brad nailer. The differences are that the brad is 18 gauge and handles 5/8" to 2" and the finish is 16 gauge and goes from 3/4" to 2 1/2". PC does have a battery powered model, but I don't know anything about the size nails it handles----suggest you check their site.

        From the work you describe, you want to do, I don't think one type is going to work. For house trim work and larger furniture work, you really need the finish nailer-----What might work is to get the finish nailer combo kit and buy a separate pin nailer for the little stuff like trains, etc. Street price on the finish combo is $299. Pin nailer, I believe, is under $100.

        I've had the finish kit for more than a year and love it. Since the compressor is so small, moving it around is not a problem. Just keep in mind that this type of compressor has it's limits. It will not power a tool that requires a steady stream of air, such as an air sander, etc.
        Dave

        Comment


        • #5
          I also have, and love, the PC 16 ga. finish nailer. But, I didn't like their oilless compressor. I recommend a commercial quality compressor such as PrimeAir. Its rated for 100% run time, and is much quieter than the oilless compressors.
          keep makn\' sawdust!...just don\'t breath any.

          Comment


          • #6
            alright, I am probably a little more ignorant than you are giving me credit for. I don't really know the difference between brads and finish nails. I have used brads with a punch to install some trim, how are finish nails different? BTW, I just saw that PC has a brad nailer, finish nailer, and compressor for all in one kit for a few bucks more than one cordless brad nailer.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by slojim:
              I don't really know the difference between brads and finish nails. I have used brads with a punch to install some trim, how are finish nails different? BTW, I just saw that PC has a brad nailer, finish nailer, and compressor for all in one kit for a few bucks more than one cordless brad nailer.
              Pneumatic brads are 18 gauge, square in cross-section with a very small head, and go up to 2" long. Good for small moldings on furniture, edge banding, etc.

              Pneumatic finish nails come in two varieties:

              16 gauge finish nails look like 18 ga brads, only thicker and with more of a head on them. They go up to 2.5" long. Good for architectural trim, paneling.

              15 gauge finsh nails are round in cross section (like a "real" nail) and thicker still. Usually used for installing doors and windows.

              When I was shopping, the 16 ga finish nailer seemed like a good compromise, so I got the Porter Cable FN250B combo. I later added a Harbor Freight 18 ga brad gun (hey, for $15, how can you go wrong?). If I were on the market today, I'd grab the PC two-nailer combo in a heartbeat.

              Comment


              • #8
                SloJim----don't mean to sound testy, but did you read my post? More than willing to help.
                Dave

                Comment


                • #9
                  The previous answers are right, but still may leave a question about size if you haven't used them.

                  I have an 18 gauge brad nailer. When I tried to tack a heavy moulding or other "big" board, I found how easily the 18 gauge brad could bend into a z shape as the wood slid, and hold nothing.

                  So I got a 15 gauge finish nailer. Works fine for home repair, trim, etc., but the nails are far too big to tack a glue block or small furniture moulding.

                  Since I primarily make furniture, I rarely use the finish nailer. But I doubt if one nailer would do both jobs.

                  I have a big tank compressor - as big as you can run on 120 volts. It is great when I use air tools (rarely). It takes a long time to fill up (and wastes a lot of energy) if I only need to shoot a few nails. It is barely adquate for spraying with a HVLP conversion gun. So if I were doing it over again, I would buy a "real" HVLP spray system, and a small compressor for the nail guns (quick to fill, small portable tank). And forget the air ratchet and die grinder. The best deals on the small compressors come when you buy a package with the nail guns, but I already have the guns. Darn.

                  I couldn't decide, so I went without any nail gun for quite a few years. Once I got one, I wondered how I lived without it. Not only does it drive the nails cleanly, but it is far easier to keep the work aligned while you pull a trigger once, than while you swing a hammer several strokes.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Charlie brings up an excellent point about the "Z" shaped nails. I've had a number and I've got a 16 gauge nailer. I think its particularly pronounced on longer nails---above 2", so that might be a consideration in the work to be done. If you look at regular finish nails, their diameter increases proportionatly with their length. Frankly, I'd never consider installing heavy molding or outside trim with these thin gun nails.
                    Dave

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      IMHO go & buy the PC set with the two nailers. I've got their 18g brad nailer $110 and would like to get a bigger gun for the issues that the others have already listed. You'll find that most all of the "compressorless" guns are large and can be difficult to manage around small projects. Having an air compressor in the shop has been one of the most damn useful things & you're sure to discover all sorts of things it will come in handy for besides shootin' nails!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The previous answers are right, but still may leave a question about size if you haven't used them.

                        I have an 18 gauge brad nailer. When I tried to tack a heavy moulding or other "big" board, I found how easily the 18 gauge brad could bend into a z shape as the wood slid, and hold nothing.

                        So I got a 15 gauge finish nailer. Works fine for home repair, trim, etc., but the nails are far too big to tack a glue block or small furniture moulding.

                        Since I primarily make furniture, I rarely use the finish nailer. But I doubt if one nailer would do both jobs.

                        I have a big tank compressor - as big as you can run on 120 volts. It is great when I use air tools (rarely). It takes a long time to fill up (and wastes a lot of energy) if I only need to shoot a few nails. It is barely adquate for spraying with a HVLP conversion gun. So if I were doing it over again, I would buy a "real" HVLP spray system, and a small compressor for the nail guns (quick to fill, small portable tank). And forget the air ratchet and die grinder. The best deals on the small compressors come when you buy a package with the nail guns, but I already have the guns. Darn.

                        I couldn't decide, so I went without any nail gun for quite a few years. Once I got one, I wondered how I lived without it. Not only does it drive the nails cleanly, but it is far easier to keep the work aligned while you pull a trigger once, than while you swing a hammer several strokes.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have a PC 15 ga angled finish nailer for trim work and a PC 18 ga brad nailer for detail. I love them both. I also have a PC angled framing nailer for the big jobs.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            SloJim----don't mean to sound testy, but did you read my post? More than willing to help.
                            That's ok daveferg. I read your post, but thought your were talking specifically about the guns, and not necessarily nails in general. I had figured brads or finish nails could both come in a variety of sizes, so I misunderstood what you were telling me.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              If you haven't experianced the joy of cordless nail guns, I highly reccomend them. I have a senco brand battery powered nail gun and almost never use my corded nailers.

                              The lack of hose means that you will not have to drag it across anything, you will never have to reposition your compressor on a job site, there is no compressor at all - i.e. no noise, no weight to haul, etc....

                              Just my two cents.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X