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120V vs 220V

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  • 120V vs 220V

    Greetings!

    I have an electrician coming over tomorrow to do some wiring, and my Saw (TS-3650) can be wired for 220V if one so desires. Is there any reason why I would want to have this at 220V? If so, may as have it done while he's here. (In MA, one can't do household wiring...has to be done by a Licensed Electrician).

    Thanks!

  • #2
    If you are running a long wire from the breaker box to the saw, you will have a smaller voltage drop using 220V - given the same size wire.

    On the other hand, with properly sized wire and a circuit that is not overloaded, it won't matter if you use 110V or 220V power.

    Comment


    • #3
      Personally, I'd have it wired for 220. (Just remember that you have to make some adjustment [jumper or whatever] on the motor itself.) As was previously mentioned, the "voltage drop" will be lower"... actually, 220 draws half the amps that 110 does. What causes the voltage drop is that the amperage will exceed the limits of the wire and the circuit, and the voltage drops. This not only could trip the circuit breaker, but puts a heckuva strain on your motor and the shop wiring.

      So, the primary reason for going with the higher voltage is to cut the amps. I believe your saw is rated pretty close to 15 amps. Larger gauge wire can handle more amps (12 gauge is normally used for 110 volt line with a max of 20 amps). This is sort of like having a larger diameter pipe if you want more water flow. Increasing the pressure behind the water will increase the flow, but also risks splitting the pipe. Likewise, increasing the amp draw on a wire, due to demand, will risk overheating the wire. This happens when first starting the saw or when the saw is under load. Either situation dramatically increase the amperage.

      On a 20 amp circuit you're probably okay, but at 110 volt, a 15 amp motor under load will quickly approach the 20 amp limit of the circuit. Theoretically, the same motor at 220 volts will draw less than 8 amps, which gives you substantial margin. The motor will run more efficiently and you will stay well under the limits of the wire.

      Hope this helps,

      CWS

      Comment


      • #4
        As CWSMITH said the amp draw is 1/2 at 240v. I have my jp610,ts3650 and bs1400 all at 240v and all run cooler start up and perform better. All motors perform better at 240v if possible to be wired that way.

        Comment


        • #5
          I was thinking that the motor only draws 13 amps. That gives you 30%margin on a 20 amp at 110. You do give up the ability to move your saw unless you have 220. I don't see the gain unless you are having problems. The flip side is that you will need 220v for dust collection or perhaps a compressor so you might want to factor this into the decision.It will cost around a $100 maybe more, for all three but it is cheaper than having him come back.

          Comment


          • #6
            If you have used the tools at both voltages you would see that as I have said the function is much better and you can run longer extension cords if you need to because the amp draw is 1/2 the amount.
            It maybe hard to tell unless you have used them both ways.

            Comment


            • #7
              I went to rewire my 3650 today to 220V and ran into a problem. I changed the wiring as detailed on the motor and in the manual, but it won't run on 220V.

              I've checked and rechecked the wiring switch, and have 120 on both leads at the motor, but it won't run on 220V.

              I switched the wiring back to original and it runs fine on 120V.

              Any help would be appreciated. Hopefully it's something simple I missed.

              Woodrat

              Comment


              • #8
                Forgive me if I am being too simplistic but gotta ask. You say you have 120 at both leads, are you referencing that to ground? What to you have across the leads? My bet is 0 volts. You may have taken both the 120 lines from the same phase. You need to have 1 'phase' that is 180 degrees out form the other. Usually a dual gang breaker will hit both sides but if you are using a double breaker ( two breakers designed to replace one) you will only have one of the 'phases'

                Comment


                • #9
                  WBrooks:

                  You hit it right on the head. Thanks for the help.

                  Guess that's why they call this "Ask the experts". This forum is a truly a valuble resource.

                  Thanks again,

                  Woodrat

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    All motors perform better at 240v if possible to be wired that way.
                    Andrew - With all due respect the above quote is not true. All motors perform better when receiving full voltage. If the 110v (120V) circuit is delivering everything the motor needs, it will run the same on either 110 or 220. Only if there is a deficiency in the 110v circuit, the motor will perform better on 220v, providing the 220v circuit is also capable of delivering full power. The motor coils see the same amperage and voltage either way...they just change from series to parallel when the wiring changes.

                    [ 07-20-2004, 06:16 AM: Message edited by: Knot Me ]

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                    • #11
                      I am not an expert in this area but my friend is and because you have 2 phases ineffect going to the motor there is a better power advantage. The windings also have less heat buildup,and you draw 1/2 the amps thru the wire. The current is not called 2 phase but it is out of phase(both sides of the box/poles),the sine waves are a complete 180 deg. out of phase of each other and such gives the armature power in X and Y axis instead of only X which results in a more efficent motor. There is only advantages to 220/240v use in motors. 3 phase is even better, X,Y,Z axis are involved.
                      If some one is a Physics expert they may be able to explain it better.

                      This may be of interest,
                      http://www.popularwoodworking.com/fe...ea.asp?id=1090

                      [ 07-22-2004, 05:12 AM: Message edited by: Andrew Benedetto ]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I've read the ridgid manuals and they recommend that if you choose to re-wire for the 240V option that you use 240V 15 amp. I have a 240V 20 amp outlet in my garage.

                        The only difference is the 15 amp circuit would normally be 14 guage wire with 15 amp breaker and the 20 amp circuit would be 12 guage wire with 20 amp breaker. Would using the 20 amp circuit be a problem or should I have it converted to 15 amp.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          TRW,

                          Use the 20 amp! The ampere rating is the maximum amount of current (amps) that the line can safely handle continueously without beginning to heat. So a 20 amp circuit will handle "up to" 20 amps. Personally, your wire sizes are about minimum for the amp rating. I never run anything less than 12 gauge wire, even if it is on a 15 amp breaker.

                          Hope this helps,

                          CWS

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