Announcement

Announcement Module
Collapse

How To Post Images

Want to know the how to upload images to your posts? Image Posting Tutorial
See more
See less

Finish for ash chairs

Page Title Module
Move Remove Collapse
X
Conversation Detail Module
Collapse
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Finish for ash chairs

    I'm just about ready to glue together and finish a set of 8 ladder back chairs but I haven't decided how to finish them yet. The ash that I've used is quite light in color so I think I would like to darken the wood a little but that is probably secondary. My main question is the type of finish. I'm looking for suggestions and advice. I've put a ton of time and work into this and don't want to mess it up in the end.
    Thanks.

  • #2
    You're options are wide open!

    I would do this.

    One or more coats of a dewaxed Rudy Amber shellac. THis will seal the wood, and add color to it. (sand each coat lightly with 220 grit)
    I would then coat with two coats of laquer. This will protect the shellac, and give you a good hard finish.
    Support Our Troops!
    www.mnpatriotguard.org
    www.patriotguard.org

    Comment


    • #3
      Since my main hobby is refinishing antiques, I would use some fruitwood stain mixed with zip guard. Add a little stain to zip guard to the color you like most, use gloss oil base for this only. Apply 3 coats sanding in between coats. Apply satin as your last coat to take the glare away, You'll have good depth in your wood finish. Robert

      Comment


      • #4
        What is Zip Guard?

        Best Regards,

        Henry

        Comment


        • #5
          Zip Guard is a poly finish that is rated good enough for floors. Its a finisg that you can brush, spray, wipe or spong on. Its a finish that you strech as far as it will go instead of coating the surface. It can br thinned w/ mineral spirits, it can be mixed w/stain. Robert

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Robert. I've always believed tinted one-step polys, such as Minwax, would not be favored by woodworkers, but, through custom mixing you seem to share a different view. I've been trying to get some subtle shades in maple and have been considering tinting either poly or shellac. My problem is the blotching that is apparently typical in maple. Particularly in curly maple, I want the curly parts to not soak up more color than the harder grain. Based on your post, I think I will give it a shot.

            One more thing, who makes Zip Guard?

            Best regards,

            Henry

            [ 08-27-2003, 05:24 PM: Message edited by: Henry Anthony ]

            Comment


            • #7
              You might try the MINWAX Wood Conditioner to eliminate the blotchy staining, I use on all grades of woods even though it's sold as a softwood conditioner. I have had no good experiences with the all-in-one Poly Stains. I use only oil-based stains and depending on the expected use, I either apply Polyurethane or simply paste wax it. I used the Uretane on my step-stool and bookcases but I waxed my dining table and with only one waxing a year it stays looking great. It's easier to remove dents as well when it's not Urethaned.

              Comment


              • #8
                Zip Guard is made by Zip Guard. One more thing, Try to find Fruitwwod stain. There is something about fruitwood that I just can't figure out. I'v tried many many many different colors of stain, for some reason fruitwood works on any hard wood that I have come across. It has a tint that works great with yellow woods and red woods. Robert

                Comment


                • #9
                  Robert, I agree. Fruitwood is one of my favorites. My tastes tend toward lighter, more natural colors.

                  Best regards,

                  Henry

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I'll second the wood conditioner as a simple method to avoid blotchy staining. One note though is that it changes the final color some, darkening and making slightly more yellow. This is usually not a problem but can be at times.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X