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  • Green stuff

    He all. I will be building a house this summer and will have a nice shop in the basement. Since my family (lovely wife, two year old boy and a new born in september) will be right above the shop, I would like to know what is the best way (and cheapest) to sound proof the shop? I heard there is some Green stuff kinda like fiber board or something, anyone know of this? Any comments? I also heard that potato bags and egg cartons and cork work well. Any one who gives me their cheapest way of effectively sound proofing thier shop will recieve..........a big thank you.

    Later
    Are you Rapture ready? Know Jesus Christ or know his enemy!

  • #2
    egg cartons are a fire hazard, and most likely void your insurance policy. Stay away from that idea completely.

    Use batton insulation between the floor joists, and sheet the ceiling with 1" thick 1 lb EPS (expanded poly styrine). commonly known as styrofoam. It's soft, doesn't transmit vibration is has a touch of insulation factor. Using a solid sheeting such as OSB or plywood on the bottome of the floor joist with hollow space between the joists acts more like a speaker and magnifies the sound waves.

    Best sound deadener is sprayed in polyisosyranate. But that's very expensive.
    John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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    • #3
      Unfortunately there's no cheap and easy solution. There are special products out there to help with specific cases, but plain old mass is the best solution for airborne sound. The most practical and cost effective methods is used in better apartments - resilient channels over framing and double drywall. The resilient channels are just metal sections that break the sound conduction path. Drywall is actually one of the most inexpensive materials you can buy ( < $0.20/sq. ft). You don't even have to tape or finish it. The USG web site has lots of info on usage of drywall and sound. Check out http://www.usg.com/design_solutions/...roduction.asp.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by UO_Woody:
        egg cartons are a fire hazard, and most likely void your insurance policy. Stay away from that idea completely.

        Use batton insulation between the floor joists, and sheet the ceiling with 1" thick 1 lb EPS (expanded poly styrine). commonly known as styrofoam. It's soft, doesn't transmit vibration is has a touch of insulation factor. Using a solid sheeting such as OSB or plywood on the bottome of the floor joist with hollow space between the joists acts more like a speaker and magnifies the sound waves.

        Best sound deadener is sprayed in polyisosyranate. But that's very expensive.
        Thanks a lot. I had no idea about it being a fire hazard. I will look into what you mentioned.
        Are you Rapture ready? Know Jesus Christ or know his enemy!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ByteButcher:
          Unfortunately there's no cheap and easy solution. There are special products out there to help with specific cases, but plain old mass is the best solution for airborne sound. The most practical and cost effective methods is used in better apartments - resilient channels over framing and double drywall. The resilient channels are just metal sections that break the sound conduction path. Drywall is actually one of the most inexpensive materials you can buy ( < $0.20/sq. ft). You don't even have to tape or finish it. The USG web site has lots of info on usage of drywall and sound. Check out http://www.usg.com/design_solutions/...roduction.asp.
          Thank you. Since I will be buying lots of drywall a few extra sheets will not hurt.
          I will check out the site.
          Are you Rapture ready? Know Jesus Christ or know his enemy!

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          • #6
            How tall are your ceilings (or upstair's floor joists)? If you have room you can interspace additional joists dropped half the width of the original joists. Then weave insulation batts between the old and new joists then double drywall the ceiling on the new dropped joists. A lot of sound is transmitted via vibration through connected pieces of material. Using the new joists isolates the ceiling (and the shop) from the joists and floor of the first floor. The insulation batts help deaden what sound is transmitting through the air between the two. this also works with walls.

            George

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            • #7
              Originally posted by gator:
              How tall are your ceilings (or upstair's floor joists)? If you have room you can interspace additional joists dropped half the width of the original joists. Then weave insulation batts between the old and new joists then double drywall the ceiling on the new dropped joists. A lot of sound is transmitted via vibration through connected pieces of material. Using the new joists isolates the ceiling (and the shop) from the joists and floor of the first floor. The insulation batts help deaden what sound is transmitting through the air between the two. this also works with walls.

              George
              That sounds like a good idea. Seems to be a little more work but should be worth it. I will look into it.
              Thanks George.
              Are you Rapture ready? Know Jesus Christ or know his enemy!

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              • #8
                If you can find Fine Woodworking's Tools and Shops issue from last year (Nov or Dec, I think) it has an excellent article on soundproofing.

                I used Roxul Safe and Sound insulation and found that it really helped. Lots of little things to watch for though...I discovered how much sound can travel through ABS drain pipes. I spent a lot of time boxing in and insulating around my ducts so there was no travel through them, but when I'm re-sawing on the bandsaw, the noise travels through the kitchen sink and the upstairs bath drain. Now I have to find the time to box around and insulate the exposed pipes.

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