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  • Sinking Saw Blade

    I am attempting to plough a .70" wide Dado 3/8" deep in 23/32 CD plywood using a 7" adjustable (wobble) carbide dado blade on my TS2400 10" Table Saw.

    My saw blade fails to hold the elevation (constantly lowers on its own). BTW, the Elevation Knob is rotating in the appropriate direction.

    Is there a locking mechanism I am overlooking or an adjustment I can make to increase resistance to downward pressure on the motor cradle once the desired height level has been set.

  • #2
    I think your problem is excessive vibration from the wobble dado. You'll have better luck & quality flat bottom dados with a standard dado set.
    Use safety devices or you may not need gloves.

    Comment


    • #3
      I have used a wobble dado blade for years. When it is properly mounted, there is almost no vibration. About once a year I forget to include the sleeve that goes between the blade and shaft on my unit, and the vibration is frightening, even though the blade appears to be working. By now I recognize my annual brain lapse, and stop immediately, but I would expect the vibration from a mismounted wobble dado to shake any saw out of adjustment. Thus I would start by checking that the blade is properly mounted.

      My next dado blade will probably be a stacked dado rather than a wobble, but I don't feel strong enough to spend money on a different type of blade at this point. Thus if you can get rid of the vibration, I wouldn't automatically assume that a wobble dado must be replaced (but that is just my opinion).

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      • #4
        When the question was asked about a Blade height adjustment lock, the "experts" said it wasn't nesscary because of the Ridgid blade height design would make it impossible for the blade to lower. Now some are saying the blade can lower if there is enough vibration. If that is true and knowing Murphy’s law shouldn’t there be a blade height lock?

        Please explain so I understand do you need a blade height lock or not. Because if it is needed and the Ridgid doesn’t have it I can narrow down my possible saw list.
        Rev Ed

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        • #5
          My Dad has had a Craftsman contractors saw since 1957 & used it for commercial work much more than any of us hobbiests would ever use one. I looked it over real carfully before I purchased my 1997 Craftsman contractors saw. Both of these saws appear to be made very much the same way that the Ridgid contractors saw is. Neither my dad or myself have had any problem with the blade heighth dropping. I think you'll find that the adjustment mechanism on these saws is some what different that other saws needing blade heighth locks. Jake can can give you a better idea of why this is so. I think it has to do with the thread pitch & amount of threads on the adjustment mechanism.
          Use safety devices or you may not need gloves.

          Comment


          • #6
            I don't know if the 2400 is a different design than the 2424---Like Orig. Bart, I have an older Craftsman---grandfather to present 2424---I can tell you it would take a heck of a force for the blade to lower by itself. The arbor assembly has a gear tooth radius, which interlocks with a contineous worm gear, which is part of/attaches too the shaft, going through the front of the saw, where the front handle attaches. (as you might be able to tell--I've had the saw apart ).

            The only possible way for the blade to drop would be if the lock on the pin, attaching the arbor assembly to the gear/shaft, had worked loose and the teeth of the worm gear were only partly engaged.

            I would also add Dave A.'s great suggestion, to always set your height on the upward direction, which avoids any freeplay, downward.
            Dave

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            • #7
              2400 is a portable saw, not the same as 2412 or 2424. Not that I think that's gonna help you, RevEd...

              Dave

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