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  • Miter cuts

    I am installing 3/4" quarter round on the top edge and ends of basboard. I need to know what settings to use on the Ridgid 12" compound miter saw to enable me to get a 90° miter edge at the end of the quarter round. I will not only be putting the quarter round on top of the base board but also at the ends to cover the exposed cut. Any suggestions would help.

    Thanks

  • #2
    are you at all familiar with a technique i believe is called "back cutting"?
    \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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    • #3
      I have done that type trim many times in the past. Your best bet is to invest in an angle finder from your local big box home center. Then you can measure each angle you want covered with trim and make sure they are 90 degrees...if so, you'll want inside and outside cuts to be 45 degrees each for a perfect 90 degree corner. Adjust accordingly for corners out of 90 up or down.
      Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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      • #4
        I think a copping joint (cut the trim to follow the profile of the other piece) is better for inside corners that a miter cut. For outside corners make sure that you measure the exact angle and ajust you miter cut accordingly.

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        • #5
          maurice...

          your "coping" post is what i was referring to as back cutting. hope i got the terminology correct
          \"A SHIP OF WAR IS THE BEST AMBASSADOR\"<br /><br />OLIVER CROMWELL

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          • #6
            after re reading your question I think you are asking about the end grain you will see at the end of your exposed cut.

            If that is what you are asking, then you want to return the wood on itself so your grain will wrap around and cover the endgrain with a grain continuing all the way around.

            if that is what you are asking, then cut your peice from the end grain towards the middle on a 45 deg. angle. Then take another peice of the same stock and cut another cut the same way.

            with what you have left on the second piece you cut, you then cut that piece off which will leave you with an end grain you can glue on the end of the original piece you cut, but it will be a wrap around and not end cut grain.

            hope this isn't too confusing. And watch out for your fingers.

            happy woodworking

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