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  • Panel Molding

    I need to join two 8 foot pieces of panel molding. Is there a tape product that is good for this even as a reinforcement to a glued joint?

  • #2
    When joining molding, cut the joints at 22.5° (hides the joint line far better than a 90° cut), a little dab of glue and nail the 2 pieces on the wall.. no tape needed.

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    • #3
      Wouldn't you miter ends at a 45 Deg angle to join them. (2) 45 deg's = 90 degs.
      If It\'s Not Broke, Fix It Anyway!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by jhurd:
        Wouldn't you miter ends at a 45 Deg angle to join them. (2) 45 deg's = 90 degs.
        For inside or outside corners yes but for straight runs, WB's method looks nicer IMO.
        Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jhurd:
          Wouldn't you miter ends at a 45 Deg angle to join them. (2) 45 deg's = 90 degs.
          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          Originally posted by BadgerDave
          For inside or outside corners yes but for straight runs, WB's method looks nicer IMO.
          Actually you should miter the 2 pieces at 45 degees (also called a scarf joint.) The main reason to do it this way is because it allows you to do 2 things:

          1. It gives more surface area to apply glue to and
          2. You can pre-drill and put a couple of small finish nails to hold the joint tight.

          Generally, if you don't nail the 2 ends of the scarf joint, the ends of the boards will inevitably twist, which in turn will open up the joint and it will not look so good.

          If you cut the ends @ 22.5 (22 1/2} degrees and you try to nail the ends together, the ends WILL split.

          As for outside corners, yes you should miter them, but on inside corners you should "cope" the joints. A coped joint is much tighter and you won't get the joint "opening up."

          [ 06-28-2005, 07:05 AM: Message edited by: CARPENTERDON ]
          Dimensional Carpentry & Custom Woodworking
          Historic Renovations, Restoration, & Custom Log Homes


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