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  • Wood Burn

    I just setup my new TS3650 this weekend and started a new project using cherry and hard maple. During the setup I tried to be very carefull to make sure everything was square, there was no blade heeling or runout etc.

    The cherry cut very smoothly but I got significant burn with the maple. I installed a new DeWalt blade (DW7657 60 teeth ATB) hoping that would help. While it did a little I still got significant burn.

    I have done some research and after typical suggestions on allignment etc. there was a recommendation that you needed at least a 2hp motor. I would hate to think my new saw is not powerfull enough for maple. (the maple board was 6/4 x 8 x 24)

    Any thoughts or recommendations would be greatly appreciated.
    Pat

  • #2
    Were you cross cutting or ripping the maple??

    David

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    • #3
      Sorry, can't believe I left out such a detail. I did both. The burn occured when I was ripping.
      Pat

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      • #4
        Sixty is too many teeth for ripping. I disagree strongly with DeWalt's labelling that blade as a general purpose blade, it is a crosscut in my book.

        Highest number of teeth/configuration I would recommend for any ripping with your saw is 40/General Purpose, or maybe 50/Budke (combination).

        But for stock as thick as you list, I'd recommend either a 30/glue line rip or 24/rip. You'll be much happier with the results, I bet.

        Dave

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        • #5
          Yes, Dave has the answer for you, hence my initial question.

          Use less teeth for ripping. When I rip decent hardwoods, especially hard rock maple, I use a 24T Freud. Softwoods I don't mind a 40T combo or even a 50T blade.

          David

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          • #6
            Thanks for the suggestions. I tried with the original 40T but will install a 24T blade and try again.
            Pat

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            • #7
              one more thing to try and this will probably pee off the safety gurus but it works for me is to increase the blade height it seems the tooth angle is increased and the saw spends less time in the wood and less burn, hard maple and cherry are the 2 i have the most problem with especially ripping , bill

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              • #8
                Often blade heigth can make a slight difference. Safety does then become a higher factor. When raising the blade, especially on narrow stock in ripping, by all means use feather boards, or smoothed edge scraps clamped to the table top and fence for hold fasts.

                A wedge spliter will also help hold the stock against the fence past the outfeed side of the blade. (not recommended for all cutting operations!)
                John E. Adams<br /><a href=\"http://www.woodys-workshop.com\" target=\"_blank\">www.woodys-workshop.com</a>

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                • #9
                  The combination of the blade you're using and the size/type of wood are the most likely culprits. However, a thin-kerf blade (and maybe a blade stiffener) would help. I've had problems with 8/4 popular even with a thin-kerf. You might also consider aligning your rip fence along the lines suggested by Kelly Mehler in his book on the table saw. He suggests a slight (about 1/64" I believe) toe-out (back of fence is slightly farther away from blade than the front of the fence). The idea is that once the piece is cut at the front of the blade it no longer needs contact with the blade. This lessens the likihood of kickback as well as burns.

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