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  • having pride in your work

    one of the greatest things about woodworking is the pride you have in your work.
    its a universal thing that is highly gratifying in doing a nice job.
    and a craftsmans pride shows up in his work.
    I for one do not like to use any particle board at all
    I prefer cut and sanded boards and rarely use plywood.
    handcrafted furniture can command premium prices and many people look for this as well.
    i think the hardest part of doing quality work is parting with it.
    shooting the s*** is a lot more fun when you use hollow points (much more splatter)

    coffee hell gimme booze!!!

  • #2
    Re: having pride in your work

    I will provide an alternate view on this post bearing in mind I'm a novice woodworker myself.

    Definitely one should take pride in doing good job when making something out of wood and crafting it well. It will be a source of pride for sure when finished.

    As far as materials though they all do have their place. Some of you may have seen my "Cherry Entertainment Center" thread. That project in addition to real wood also uses plywood and melamine. Why? The black melamine in some non-critical areas to go with the black color of many entertainment systems (wood painted black would not look as good) and plywood for dealing with wood movement. For large solid carcases plywood can be a better choice to minimize warping and bowing. There are also other techniques such as shiplapping to deal with wood movement issues.

    As far as cut and sanded wood - depending on the size of your shop you probably have more flexibility if you have the space and money to have a planer, jointer etc. Why? Wood rarely comes in consistent thickness and when making things out of a mix of different woods you may be in for a surprise when you find out what 3/4" actually means for each of those pieces. Doing this yourself gives you a greater control or level of precision on your woodworking.

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    • #3
      Re: having pride in your work

      I read this a few days ago when it was first posted, but with all the snow shoveling I've been doing, this is the first opportunity to really comment on such a good post.

      Some of us are more utilitarian in our work, I think; mostly fulfilling a remodeling need with whatever woodworking skills we might posess. To this point in time, I think I fall into that catagory. Still, I take pride in what I do and though the budget and other constraints may well apply, I do try to do my best. Biggest fan I suppose is my wife, as she alone knows the time that goes into the projects.

      I sure would like to get to a point where I can actually build furniture or work with a higher grade stock than pine. Thus far, about the only upscale wood I've done is the oak trim and wainscote in the kitchen. Nice, but certainly not worthy of pridefully posting any pictures of... especially when I see the fantastic stuff that so many members here have posted.

      Regarding stock selection such as sheet goods, etc. I too would much rather work with solid stock. I've never been happy with working with ply, even when veneered. But then my applications thus far are just as easily done with jointing stock to make the window benches, etc. in our 2nd floor library (14 x 19), and of course all the bookcases there (and in my wife's "cookbook room" [11 x 9]) were made from 1 x 10 pine. It offers the best stiffness to weight ratio. I did use finished ply in that particular room (cookbook room) for the long bench seats, which run under two multiple-window walls. Okay, but I don't like the way the edges came out, even with them trimmed with solid stock.

      I also should mention that I'm not a big fan of screws, especially those used in face-frame applications. I much prefer the use of dowels wherever possible. I try to keep my woodworking projects as free of metal as possible, though the occasional brad does serve it's purpose.

      For me, and perhaps its just my personality or some inherited gene or something, but I get a great deal of pleasure from what can be to some, just a simple task. There's a certain finesse to just getting a nice cut, a perfect fitting joint, and a simplistic clean, straight-edge design to something I've made. I'm not into fancy trim, scrolls, etc.; but that's not to say that I don't appreciate all the extra skill that such designs might well take.

      I'm not sure where I got it from, as I don't recall my father having it, but there's a great amount of satisfaction in just doing something well. As an illustrator, with thousands of hours 'on the board', I alwasy took pride in that everything that I drew, looked exactly like the objects that they were supposed to be. No schematic or block-style illustrations ever came off MY board, and I never fell into the category of "good enough". To some degree that hurt as 'time is money' in a lot of that business. But none-the-less, I never wanted anyone too look at something and wonder "What the hell is that supposed to be!". The last manager I had used to say that I could make my illustrations "sing". I sure would like to pass that on to my woodworking skills.

      Lastly, I like designing or at least drawing the plans to whatever I build. I don't like using someone else's plans and I really don't use any available plans; preferring to think, and then draw what I plan to build. I work everthing out in a drawing or illustration first (all done on the computer now with CorelDraw and occasionally SketchUp.) That way, all the details are taken care of, including how the stock will be cut... well before I buy the stock or turn on any tool. That way, I can see any points of conflict, stress, or structural concerns. The illustrations also go a long way to getting the most out of the stock too. (For example, in building both the cookbook room and the library, my entire scrap amounted to less than a 30-gal container of very small bits and pieces.)

      CWS
      Last edited by CWSmith; 02-08-2014, 12:56 PM.

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      • #4
        Re: having pride in your work

        Originally posted by gnuuser View Post
        one of the greatest things about woodworking is the pride you have in your work.
        its a universal thing that is highly gratifying in doing a nice job.
        and a craftsmans pride shows up in his work.
        I for one do not like to use any particle board at all
        I prefer cut and sanded boards and rarely use plywood.
        handcrafted furniture can command premium prices and many people look for this as well.
        i think the hardest part of doing quality work is parting with it.
        you're not lying buddy.I have a nice little furniture making area in my shop.I make dressers , tables , chairs and easy stuff like that. It takes precision ,patience and a real skill to deliver quality. I made a coffee table, and two end tables.With 4"×4" s 2"×4 and 2"×6" came out beautiful. Finished it off with a dark walnut stain and 6 coats of poly.It looked so good that I couldn't part with it, but I had already promised my buddy .I made the exact same ones and kept them for myself.

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        • #5
          Re: having pride in your work

          yeah i do cad but i still have my drafting set for blueprints and schematics.
          my boss said mechanical drafting is just about a lost art anymore
          shooting the s*** is a lot more fun when you use hollow points (much more splatter)

          coffee hell gimme booze!!!

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: having pride in your work

            Plywood is Your friend,when building wide panels in furniture.I use it all the time.I have hundreds of board feet of cherry,walnut and red oak
            but You need to know where to use it.Stable assemblies can not be discounted,if You want the piece to last,for decades.
            JMHO but I know ,My childrens,childrens will be enjoying the things I've made or trash them,because thay,are not in style anymore.

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