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Measuring Tape on the TS3650

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  • Measuring Tape on the TS3650

    Is anyone having problems with the accurace of measurements? My metal measure bar is off almost 1/32 on some numbers and after going to two Home Depots and looking at the displays, they are off too. I can't be the only one..am I?

  • #2
    Check your alignment to the sawblade. Did you recently change blades? I've got the 3650 fence & rails on my 2424 & they are "dead-nuts" on to the blade I've currently got installed. I've noticed slight alterations when a different manufacturers blade is installed, but that's one of the few down sides of a left tilt. A thicker or thinner blade will alter the distance between the blade cut & fence since the arbor is to the left of the blade!

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    • #3
      What is off is the ruler itself, not the distance from the blade. If you take a tape to the ruler on your table the distance from one inch to the other are not accurate, therefore I don't know what I will get when I set the fence. Let me know what yours is. I find it is disturbing when the demos at two different Home Depot as well as a new box we opened up are all inacurate.

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      • #4
        Teri, that's an interesting observation. If I understand you correctly, the ruler itself is not accurate. I tested my 3650 this morning as follows:

        Stanley 16 ft. tape - Measuring from 0" to 36" the two scales looked even up all the way down the rulers. The Stanley is calibrated to 16ths of an inch, but this is close enough to see that the two line up. It is a bit tricky trying to measure the RIDGID rule with a tape, but I'm sure you know that.

        Fairgate 18" Center-Finding Rule - This metal straightedge is calibrated to 32nds of an inch, and has always been very accurate for me. Measuring against the RIDGID rule from 0" to 36", the two were dead-on with each other. I checked at 18", as well as several points in between. Then I measured from 18" to 36" on the RIDGID, and got the same results.

        Johnson 48" Heavy Duty Straightedge - I don't use this guy for highly accurate measurements, but rather as a straightedge and for rough cuts. I've never actually tested its accuracy for fine work. It is calibrated to 16ths of an inch. Interestingly, when I place it up to the RIDGID scale, the two rules got progressively off. The RIDGID was 1/32" longer than the straightedge at the RIDGID 36" mark (or the straightedge was short, depending on your POV). Since the RIDGID lined up with the other two measures, I'm concluding that the straightedge is a little off.

        Teri, when you say the RIDGID ruler is off by 1/32", is that at the end of the rule (a cumulative effect) or are you seeing inaccuracies within the rule, randomly?
        There are three kinds of people in this world - those who can count, and those who can't.

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        • #5
          Thanks for the reply. What I am seeing is random inaccuracy. 4 different salesmen from Home Depot helped check with me and saw the saw was off in all cases. We even took out a new guide fence and it was off as well. Since my saw is brand new maybe the manufacturer used a different template than what you have. Because the measurements are so inconsistent it is hard to know when the fence will cut accurately or when it will be off. We checked with a Stanley tape and with one I purchased at Woodcraft that is a flat, soft material you can write on. I checked that tape against a Delta saw and the Delta was right on.

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          • #6
            I just measured the tape on my saw and it's dead on accurate. That being said, whenever I'm doing a project that requires very accurate measurements I seldom use the tape on the rails choosing instead to manually measure with a tape measure.
            Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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            • #7
              I guess because I have never owned a table saw like this before I just assumed I could rely on the tool or accuracy. I realize there are ways around it, but if Delta is extremely acccurate why can't Ridgid be? I will call tomorrow and see where I get. If they sent me another one in the mail I can't trust it is correct either.

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              • #8
                I guess if this is the only drawback to the tool I should deal with it. I like all the other features about it and did not find another saw I liked better. The motor is pretty quiet and I love the Herc-u-lift feature. I will still call Ridgid tomorrow and see if they have had any complaints. I assume this part was produced by Emerson?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Teri:
                  ............but if Delta is extremely acccurate why can't Ridgid be?
                  What makes you think that Delta owners trust their tapes anymore than RIDGID owners? I'd bet that Delta and most other mfgs. have had issues with tape measures at one time or another.
                  Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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                  • #10
                    You are probably correct, however, I just am not sure that Ridgid can rectify this for me and I am surprised I am the only one on this site that has even brought this up, unfortunately. I build mostly furniture so was hoping to have a tape measure on the table that would be reliable enough to us instead of marking by hand. Of course I am not an expert in this field so possibly this is just stuff you deal with in the industry. At any rate it is frustrating.

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                    • #11
                      Teri:

                      When I first bought my 3612 saw a few years ago, I was having problems like what you describe, where it seemed to be hard to get accurate results with the fence. One cut 8" from the blade was 8", but when I slid the fence to 26". I got measurements that were off by as much as 1/8".

                      I measured with tape measures, rules, whatever I could find. It got to teh point where Ridgid offered to send me a new rail for my saw if I would send the old one back for inspection. Right before I took them up on their offer, I realized that the tape was fine, the rail was fine, but the iron extensions weren't dead square, so when the were mounted on the saw, they coused the rails to bend somewhat and distort the measurements. I have since replaced the wings and di not have a problem after that.

                      I guess my point is that I wouldn't overlook other possible causes of what you are looking at. I have had tapes that don't measure correctly, so maybe that could be the problem. Possible something off with the fence?

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                      • #12
                        The tape certainly appears to be flush to the metal and the metal guide bar in perfect tact, but what you are saying would make sense. What is funny is the inconsistency of the numbers and which ones are off. Seems to be almost every other number is off, but not EVERY other. Since all my cuts are on the + side it gives me a chance to move the fince over 1/32 to get the correct cut, which is better than it taking off too much. More dealing with than I would like but other than that I truly love this saw.

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                        • #13
                          Mike, how did you go about checking the square of the iron rails? Maybe (hopefully) that is my problem

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                          • #14
                            Actually, it was easy and something I didn't do when I set up the saw. I just took a 48" straightedge and helt it along teh front of the saw so that I could see any gaps between the two wings and the front of the main table. When I put the edge against the table, I saw light on the right edge of the right wing. (almost .020 or more) I then looked at the edge on the left and found that it too was off a bit. I then realized that the aluminum rail was being bent inward after about 12" from the blade. The bent tube caused the fence to also go askew, which made the problems appear.

                            I have since replaced the wings and the problem was solved. Earlier this year, I added a Biesemeyer fence and things improved even more. In fact, I don't even use the tape measure when making cuts agaionst the fence. It is always dead on.

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