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Cross-cut sled

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  • Cross-cut sled

    I am about to build some bookcases from oak plywood and decided it would be better to do the cross-cutting with a sled. I'm thinking a 27" X 27" sled on dual maple runners would just fit the table and not be too unbalanced when slid in or out to accomodate a 12" cut. Anyone ever build one for a Ridgid TS2412, 2424, 3612? how big? and how did it work out?

  • #2
    You could ferret around my site and see two of them (dado and regular) that I built for my 2424 out of Birch ply and Maple runners...they work great...check the links section....
    Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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    • #3
      I went to the opposite extreme of Kelly - my sled is a piece of scrap 1/4 inch plywood with thin guide perpendicular to the blade, and a single hardwood runner. The whole sled is cut off at the blade (only supports one side), but it works fine for me. The joke is that that hole that was once an outlet in the scrap wall paneling is my handle! (My hobby is making furniture - beds, dressers, entertainment centers, etc.)

      Lets see, with the cost of glue and screws, mine probably cost 2 or 3 cents.

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      • #4
        Squid, when you say "build some bookcases from oak plywood," what cross-cuts are you planning to use the sled for? Are you planning to dado on the sled for the shelves, just cross-cut the oak facing, or even cut the sides and shelves to length on the sled?

        There is no one answer to sleds and many people have more than one size sled. Bigger ones hold larger material but are heavy while smaller ones are easier to use and you are more likely to get a small one out for small cross-cuts. I built a single-sided sled that looks like the Incra miter 5000 without the miter gage http://www.woodpeck.com/miter5000.html (I have to set angles manually on mine). I have found it difficult to cut really long and wide boards and may be building a 2-sided sled in the next few weeks for a current project.

        27"x27" should be easy enough to handle and not too heavy. However, if it is centered on the blade, it won't give much room for supporting material on either side. If it is aligned with the left edge of your TS wing, it should be a good general-purpose size but may still have problems with large material as I currently have on my one-sided sled. Hope this helps a little and good luck with the bookcases!

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        • #5
          Kelly,
          Is there any particular reason you choose Maple for the runners?
          Teach your kids about taxes..........eat 30 percent of their ice cream.

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          • #6
            Like rmacmec stated, there's probably a need for a variety of sleds/sliding tables depending on the projects that you wish to undertake. I tried to reduce the number that I would need to build by making one that emulated the Incra 5000. Used initially the original Ridgid Miter Gauge, then picked up the low cost Incra V27 and incorporated it. Fixed right side table goes out to the end of the wing. Fence is 36" with an MDF aux fence.

            The downside of the Ridgid TS's is that they don't have a Miter T-slot, therefore the largest panel that this can really accomodate is 22" or 24". Any greater and you're balancing the sled on the edge of the TS, which is not good. The overall length of stock is less critical, and 6' can be accomodated, due to the 36" length of the fence.



            David

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            • #7
              rmacmec - The crosscuts are simply to establish the length of the panels after ripping them from an Oak plywood sheet. The edges will all be concealed under solid Oak trim stock or bookcase top. I intended to build a two-sided sled and the suggestion to bring at least the left side out to the end of the extension is a good one for cutting longer material.
              Badger Dave - I chose Maple because of it's hardness and tight grain, I used Oak once before and experienced swelling problems periodically.

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              • #8
                Cutbuff, when I saw that picture of your sled on a previous post I didn't realize that is an Incra V27 on it. Great choice, very economical. Mine looks identical, only without the miter gage (I use a 2nd t-track L-bracket) and mine is red [img]smile.gif[/img]

                Squid, you may want a little bigger sled for cutting panels to length if you start with a ripped 8' long piece on your sled (per my problems with big boards listed in the reply above). Your choice [img]smile.gif[/img]

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                • #9
                  12" crosscut of a long board - you might just get a good straight-edge clamp and use a circular saw and then clean up the edge with a straight-cut bit on the router.

                  Might not serve your desire for a cross-cut sled, but I think you'd be done with your bookcase cuts by now.

                  [ 06-27-2003, 08:46 AM: Message edited by: Jerry Jensen ]

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Badger Dave:
                    Kelly,
                    Is there any particular reason you choose Maple for the runners?
                    Yeah...had a bunch left over from an entertainment center job!

                    You can use any hardwood.
                    Kelly C. Hanna<br /><a href=\"http://www.hannawoodworks.com\" target=\"_blank\">Hanna Woodworks</a>

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                    • #11
                      Jerry Jensen: I won't be trying to crosscut an 8' length of ply. I will first cut the panel into 2 ea. 4' X 4' pieces with a circular saw and straight-edge since my dimensions allow it, then I'll rip and crosscut to the proper dimensions. The most I'll have left of the blade will be 36" of which 18 will be supported by the sled and the overhang resting on an outfeed stand, if needed. I prefer to minimize routing on ply due to the crossed lamination grain and glue.

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                      • #12
                        I made my runners from Starboard. Starboard is that same material that plastic cutting boards are made of and the material is available at any West Marine (boat store). The thickness is a perfect 3/4" (some minor sanding might be necessary). The rails work beautifully.
                        Steve

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                        • #13
                          I've thought about using some of these new plastics but haven't gotten around to it. How does that Starboard wear? Does it require any lubrication? Will it hold fast to screws or do you screw through it into the sled? I'll go over to West Marine and check it out, they're just around the corner.

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                          • #14
                            I haven't noticed any wear. The plastic is virtually self-lubricating. The plastic also holds a screw quite well. I think you will be impressed.

                            Steve

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