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twist and shout?

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  • twist and shout?

    i have a couple of 2x4's with a mild-moderate amount of twist.
    is it possible to turn these into flat and straight boards without cutting them into pieces?
    if yes...how do you do it?

  • #2
    any takers on this one?

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    • #3
      Short of setting up some kind of jig or form to "warp" them back into place, I don't know. If you are using them for their intended purpose of studding up a wall, it would depend on how much they were warped as to whether or not you would want to use them. From my limited point of view, the cost of a 2 x 4 is still cheap enough that I'd probably just buy some straight ones and then use the warped stock to cut for smaller pieces. Trying to straightend them would be more costly (time is money) than it's worth.

      CWS

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      • #4
        Originally posted by CWSmith:
        is still cheap enough that I'd probably just buy some straight ones and then use the warped stock to cut for smaller pieces. Trying to straightend them would be more costly (time is money) than it's worth.

        CWS
        while that's true, i like to learn on "cheaper" lumber so that when i graduate to more expensive lumber, i'll have a few tricks up my sleeve.
        this 50" piece of lumber is only being used for a project i am trying to make, not framing a house...but this project does require straight lumber?
        i guess twist is not correctable? (yeah..i'm a novice woodworker who doesn't know any better yet)
        any more experienced woodworker than I have some suggestions?

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        • #5
          My wood working experience is somewhat limited but if you know anyone who works at a steel processing facility you could always ask them to slip it under a 20,000 lb slab for a few weeks. I would wager your board will be rather flat after that.
          Work hard, Play hard, Sleep easy.

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          • #6
            Twist tends to be difficult to remove without removing some of the wood (jointer / planer). It could depend on how the wood was stored (long shot). If the moisture content of the 2x4's is not even throughout the board it will cup, bend, and or twist. You could attempt to equalise the moisture content and see what happens (good knowledge to have for more expensive woods).
            Plumber is not too far off the mark with his suggestion, you need to stack the lumber off the ground with stickers in between. You can do this on the garage floor by spacing the 2x4's off the concrete on perhaps 4x4's spaced just in from each end and one in the middle for your 50" boards. place stickers between each row of boards and space the boards on each row about 1" apart as well. Stickers are about 3/4" square sticks (can also go to a lumber yard and grab a bunch of the stickers that come in their bundles - likely free). The general idea is to create space around the boards so that air can flow over them and equalize their moisture content. Now for plumbers part - you need to put a sheet of plywood or similar on the top of the stack and add some weight (bags of sand, cement blocks) anything heavey that can distribute the weight across the top of the pile.
            This process can take a few weeks for mostly dry lumber. Same as the process for drying green lumber but for that you need to leave it about 1 year for each 1" of board thickness.
            The problem with most construction timber is that it comes from new fast grown timber that tends not to be as stable as hardwood trees. IF you have an extra one, try sawing it in half lengthwise, if either side twists more you are likely not going to straighten the boards without a jointer.

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            • #7
              Just another way of looking at it----a twist or a sharp bow is just natures' signature, cause by knots or flukey grain. I don't think any amount of pressure or drying is going to help. Indeed, when 2x4s are shipping (granted green and wet) they're bundled together into nice straight piles. The twist develops when the bundle is opened and further air drying occurs. For non-construction projects----find some place that stocks actual kiln dried 2x4s----much easier to work with.
              Dave

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