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  • What am I doing wrong-jointer

    I'm working with redoak about 40"x~4"x 1" stock that I purchased as s2s. I started by running seveal boards through my jointer but when they are placed edge to edge flat there is a slight gap near the center of the boards. Still the same if I swap them around... so what am I doing wrong?

  • #2
    Did you run the face of the stock thru the jointer first? The stock has to be flat before you can edge joint it. If not, you will not get a tru 90. (I'll assume that you have already checked the fence/table set up)
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    • #3
      I think I may have found my problem. When I place the boards edge to edge and slide a piece of paper it only catches near the first and last 2" of the boards. I did use a straight edge on the jointer and I think the blades may be to high as the blades want to lift the straight edge slightly. Going to get the manual and recheck it and run another cut.

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      • #4
        Hey fellows , I have straighten my s2s lumber for years on a table saw before i run them through the jointer, i built a jig to hold the lumber on top of a straight piece of lumber with hold downs, to clamp it to the piece of lumber and then it rides on the fence of the saw .--- got this from running a saw mill --works the same as head blocks

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        • #5
          Wood Worm,

          If you have a jointer why straighten wood with a table saw? I'm relatively new to this and just wonder why.

          Best regards,

          Henry

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          • #6
            Can't speak for WWAl. In my case, it's because it is much easier, and a whole lot faster.

            Dave

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            • #7
              Henry

              It's the difference between a straight edge, and an edge that is 90* to the face of a board. A TS will get you close, but the jointer will get you dead on.

              Also, on rough cut lumber you may have to make several (10 or so) passes to get the edge straight. TS will do it in one pass. At this point I clean up the edge with the jointer.
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              • #8
                Please, a bit more information on this technique. Is the ts used to straighten edges or faces? What kind of jig is used?

                Best regards,

                Henry

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                • #9
                  Henry, what you are looking for is generically called a straightlining jig. I don't have a picture of one handy, so I'll impose on my pals over at Woodcraft for one of theirs. Hopefully gives the idea.

                  http://shop.woodcraft.com/Woodcraft/...D1046%26menu%5 Fid%3D%26Tree%3D0%2CPower%20Tool%20Accessories&2=d ept%2Easp%2Cdept%5Fid%3D2166%26menu%5Fid%3D%26Tree %3D1%2CTable%20Saw%20Accessories&Gift=False&mscssi d=006BEEB4B5764B46BC6D573D60F4 9788

                  In case the world's longest URL doesn't work, search www.woodcraft.com for product number 15J50.

                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/findpro...20saw&sku=6415
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                    • #11
                      OK, thanks, now I get it. Pretty simple for edges but how about the faces?

                      Best regards,

                      Henry

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                      • #12
                        If the bard is straight but cupped, you can usually use a planer, jointer, or drum sander to get it smooth again. If the board is tristed, the only way that you may have to get straight lumber is to cut it into smaller pieces, then use one of the methods above. Also, a board that needs to be smoothed (because of cupping, warping, or twisting) will usually be quite a bit thinner than what you started out with. That's all the more reason not to plane your recently bought 4/4 wood as soon as you bring it home. HTH

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