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  • Beveling a 1x2

    I am a total newbie to woodworking and just picked up the TS2400 Rigid. I am trying to do a 45 degree bevel on one corner of a 1x2 piece of cherry.

    All my test pieces have not turned out well. They either have burn marks, saw blade marks or both. Do I need to change the blade to a better one, or just keep practicing my feeding technique? Any advice on this would be much appreciated.

  • #2
    Stevem,
    Welcome to the Forum and to the wonderful world of woodworking.
    I assume you have your blade tipped to 45 degrees, your miter gage set to 90 degrees and are cutting the bevel by holding the stock against the miter gage and pushing it through the blade. I know that's a lot to assume, but we've gotta start somewhere. I sure hope you're using your blade guard.
    A better quality blade will reduce or eliminate saw marks depending on how much you want to spend. Sandpaper will work for now.
    The burn marks worry me. I hope you don't have the end of the board butted up against the fence. That will cause burn marks and a little thing we call "kickback". Actually it's a very big thing. Kickback occurs when a piece of wood gets trapped between the blade and fence and gets thrown back at the operator at high speed and it can happen with really big pieces of wood, not just little ones. It can cause very serious injury. Don't let cutoffs get trapped, don't stand in line with the blade, and wear safety glasses. Use push sticks, push blocks, blade guard, splitter and anti-kickback pawls whenever possible. BE SAFE!!
    If you don't have the end of the board butted up against the fence, (first of all, congratulations on not making that mistake) the stock may be moving along the miter gage just a little toward the blade as you cut it causing burn marks. To eliminate that, just clamp the stock to the miter gage. Better yet, build a miter gage extension and clamp your work to that. Hope I've been of some help.
    I would suggest a visit to the local library to pick up some reference books on tablesaws and jigs and fixtures.
    My advice to a "total newbie"? Be safe, be patient and have fun. [img]smile.gif[/img]
    By the way. Where are you located? Just curious.

    [ 07-09-2004, 05:53 PM: Message edited by: Lorax ]
    Lorax
    "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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    • #3
      As you have noticed cherry burns very easily. I get burn marks when ripping cherry with a perfectly set saw and new blade, just pause of change your feed speed for a split second and cherry burns. Practice with some poplar or pine it is cheaper and easier to work with. I dont worry much about the burns as I easily clean them up on the jointer. You may try cutting the parts 1/32 over size then run it through again to remove the sliver, this worked for me before the jointer. As Lorax said sand paper is your friend!

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      • #4
        I agree with WBrooks, cherry will burn at the drop of a hat. I have watch Dave Marks on his TV show get burn marks on pieces of Cherry. I made Cherry cradle for my Granddaughter and nearly every machine I touched to the cherry produced a burn mark. The router was the worst.

        However also like WBrooks said it is easily cleaned up with a little sand paper.
        Rev Ed

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        • #5
          thanks to you all for the replies!

          I should clarify that I am trhing to rip the 1x2 and not cross cut it... obviously even more difficult for me to do. So, I am using the fence as my guide... and it is situated very close to the blade (again obvious since I am using 1x2's)

          I think I need to spend some time reading and also constructing my own push stick or push shoe, but I would still appreciate any more advice on ripping such narrow stuck.

          Also, Lorax I am located in Wisconsin.

          Thanks again all.

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          • #6
            Build a "sled" to hold the piece and feed it through the saw. This would consist of something simple like a 2x4 with a 1x2 rabbet or a 1x4 and 1x2 tacked together. Make it longer than the work piece by a few inches. A small 1x2 tacked in the rabbet at the back will push the work through. I use a 1/4" air stapler to build up small jigs quickly. Just be careful not to put get any fasteners in the way of the blade. When your done, save it for the next job. Remember, one of the most important functions of tools is to build more tools.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RevEd:
              I agree with WBrooks, cherry will burn at the drop of a hat. I have watch Dave Marks on his TV show get burn marks on pieces of Cherry. I made Cherry cradle for my Granddaughter and nearly every machine I touched to the cherry produced a burn mark. The router was the worst.
              I did not know that! [img]smile.gif[/img] I haven't used cherry very much so I probably thought the burn marks were my fault. Thanks for the info.
              Lorax
              "Did you put the yellow key in the switch?" TOD 01/09/06

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              • #8
                Stevem,
                I agree, Wbrooks and RevEd are right cherry burns the easiest of any wood I've used FWIW. If you are useing the factory blade I would throw it away. There are a lot of good blades in the 50+ range. I've had good luck with the Freud tk906 50 tooth combo blade. HTH

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                • #9
                  Steve

                  I picked one of these up during one of my visits to Rocklers and it works real nice on narrow cuts such as the one you describe. It is narrow enough that you can still utilize the blade guard to make the cut and the magnetized handle is nice for keeping it right on your saw and not misplacing it.
                  http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product...r=push%20stick

                  Woodslayer

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                  • #10
                    From a safety standpoint, I usually prefer to run a wider board through my table saw for the 45 degree cut and then cut the 90 degree side afterwards. It gives my fingers some extra distance from the blade. For the narrow stock, I like to use a featherboard for a hold down and push the boards through with another piece of wood. After 15 years without a mishap, I had a piece of mahogany pinch the back side of the blade last year and kick back at me. I still have a scar on my arm as a result. Since then, I've always used a featherboard hold down for the lighter narrow pieces.

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                    • #11
                      Freud will be supplying Home Depot with the new Ridgid T3 Titanium blades starting this next month. These blades leave a glass like finish on hard woods like oak and require minimal sanding on soft woods too. They will be priced just above the Diablo line of blades but the quality in cut is much better. These are a true woodworkers blade not a contractor blade. So if you are looking for a great blade for about half the price of a Forrest then keep an eye out at HD they should be arriving in the next few weeks.
                      Jeff

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                      • #12
                        CujOHD, I'm curious, where did you see that it said Freud will be making the Ridgid blades?
                        I decided to change calling the bathroom the "John" and renamed it the "Jim". I feel so much better saying I went to the Jim this morning.

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                        • #13
                          If you worry about being too close to the blade as I do ,you can attach your 1x2 to a wider board by running some screws into the side about 3/8 inch provided the face will not be exposed otherwise you will hve to mave a notched sled.

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