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Planer vs Jointer

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  • Planer vs Jointer

    Allot of the pine I purchase - usually 1x6x6 - has warpage to some extent. To alleviate this would I use a Jointer or a Planer? With respect to the latter, something along the lines of the Delta 13" as seen at:

    http://www.deltawoodworking.com/index.asp?e=136&p=950

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Planers are best for thicknessing....they make one face of a board parallel to the other....including warps and twists if any exist. There are tricks, jigs, and sleds that can be built to get the planer to help flatten a board, but a jointer is designed for flattening and does it alot easier than a planer.

    The two machines work best in tandem. Pass a board's face across the jointer to make it flat. Then lay it on edge to flatten an edge that's square to the adjacent flattened face. Now you have two reference surfaces that are square to each other. Next step is to put the board through the planer with the flattened face down (away from the blades)...the planer will make the other face parallel to the flat face resulting in board that's flat on both sides....more specifically, a thinner board that's flat on both sides.

    Now you can put the reference edge against your TS fence and rip to final width. The jointer is step one in creating a reference for all the other steps. This is how you can start every project with flat and square stock.

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    • #3
      Thank you, Hewood, for the excellent explanation. Finances don't permit me to purchase both...so given my needs (flattening the boards) which would you recommend?

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      • #4
        Planners don't flatten boards they create parallel faces. If your board is twisted, bent curved or not flat the jointer is what you want.

        You can correct some of these faults on a planner but the jigs and fixtures you would have to create would make this an never ending job.

        I still say the jointer is the most under appreciated tool in the shop. When you really realize all you can do with one you will wonder how you survived without one.
        EdB
        Rev Ed

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        • #5
          Well, for better or for worse I did buy a Delta JT-160 Jointer. I've read mixed reviews of it so I'll try for myself to see how well it works. At $200 my expectations are not all that high...but we shall see. Perhaps it will suffice for what I need. If not, then back it goes.

          Thanks to everyone for your very valuable input!

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          • #6
            Well, it actually works quite well. My guess though is that that bowed side of the board faces the blades?

            Thanks!

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            • #7
              I was taught that the bow should be up. When you put the wood on a flat surface the ends of the board should touch the flat surface and the bow should not. Thats the way you run it thru the jointer.
              If you do it the other way with the ends of the piece up in the air the wood could rock as it goes thru makeing it much harder to get a flat face

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              • #8
                Thanks Jim!

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                • #9
                  Ah, sorry to disagree, but you'd have to have extremely long beds to plane out a bow, with the curve up. I just finished milling down some old barrel staves, and put the bow side down----first guestimate of the lowest part of the bow----made one pass on the jointer, which established a plane---then sucessive passes lengthened the flat side.

                  FYI---if cutting on a table saw, the bow curve goes down or you'll bind the blade.
                  Dave

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                  • #10
                    I think dave and jim could both clarify their descriptions if they referenced whichever side of the 'bow side' they are talking about as the convex or concave side. After reading I am confused, and I thought I knew which side
                    was up

                    I always thought the concave side went down towards the table. as Jim said the board will rock if you put the concave side up away from the cutter.

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                    • #11
                      Convex side down----yes, it would possibly rock on the first pass, but once you establish a flat spot, it's pretty easy---besides, if you have too much of a bow, you might as well throw the wood out as you'll have nothing left. My point is, you can't possibly put the convex side down, as you'd need in and out feed tables totaling the entire length of the board. As I said, I just went through this with 6'+ long barrel staves and tried several methods---the convex side down on the jointer was actually faster than any of the other methods I tried.
                      Dave

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                      • #12
                        You can expect to have good success straightening a bowed board that is at most twice as long as your jointer bed. Dave you are right in that if you have too much bow you will have very little material left when the board is flat. To figure out roughly how much material you will be removing lay the board on the floor (convex up) and measure the greatest distance between the floor and the wood. If you have a 1/2" gap in a 1" board you will end up with a pile of sawdust because if you need to take off 1/2" to straighten the concave side then you also need to take off 1/2" to straighten the convex side. In this case sight down the side of the board and see if you can cut out the worst of the bow and still have some length left. If the bow is in the middle and you cut the board in half you will end up with 2 straight boards 1/2" thick. I always Joint with the convex side up. The jointer cuts at both ends of the board with no cuts in the middle. After a few passes the end cuts meet in the middle and you have a flat side. Not saying Dave's method does not work just that I like the concave up method better

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                        • #13
                          Wbrooks---good description----I think both approaches have their use. On shorter pieces (4 1/2 foot or less), I did put the concave side down and it worked fine with my length of jointer, but with a 6 1/2 foot piece---it wouldn't cut it. And you're method of determining what's worth trying is pretty darned good. Lot's of pieces, particularly, where the bow isn't uniform----turns in at about the last 1/4 of the length, cutting it down is the only way to get usable wood.
                          Dave

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                          • #14
                            Ah,looks like I'm a little late back to the conversation.
                            Sorry if I was'nt clear, I run all my stock thru convex up just like Wbrooks cutting off each end of the board and meeting in the middle. Oh well differnt ways to skin a cat.

                            FYI--- I do know how to operate a tablesaw

                            [ 07-09-2004, 11:42 PM: Message edited by: Jim C. ]

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