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Jointing on a planer??

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  • Jointing on a planer??

    I recently purchased a rigid planer, i love it. I really want to start working with rough lumber but i dont have the money or space for a jointer. i was pondering the idea of either making a temporary fence or maybe clamping a few peices of lumber together and running them through the planer on their edge to "joint them" is this a bad idea, i had planed to get the boards as straight as possible on a table saw first by the way.

  • #2
    Jointing with the planer will work, but the boards have to be straight and the same width to work. aThe easiest and fastest way to edge joint any board is to use a router with flush trim bit and a straight edge. I have put my jointer up for sale because the router method is easier and quicker. OK, now everyone can jump up and tell me how wrong I am. LOL JMHO
    info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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    • #3
      Papadan wrote:
      The easiest and fastest way to edge joint any board is to use a router with flush trim bit and a straight edge. I have put my jointer up for sale because the router method is easier and quicker.
      I wouldn't say that the router method is easier then switching on the jointer, but if you can't afford a jointer then the router is a fine method of jointing the edge of boards.

      Jointing can be done on a planer, but "BE CAREFUL" doing it. If the boards tip at all the results could be disasterous.

      The router method would be much safer and you will achieve the same results.
      Dimensional Carpentry & Custom Woodworking
      Historic Renovations, Restoration, & Custom Log Homes


      I Beat The Competition Hammersdown!

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      • #4
        Ok thanks for the advise, now i have one more question. I have never used a jointer or a shaper before, and i was discussing the issue with my boss. He cautioned me to be extremely carefull with them because he knew a few people that had lost fingers on them. His suggestion was either a router or planer. I realize that all woodworking tools, well most of them, are dangerouse, and fingers can be lost at any time, but are jointers and shapers even more dangerous? please keep in mind that i have never operated either of the two and for all practical reasons am a moderately skilled woodworker, i have been doing it for a while, but there are things i have never done or don't really know how to do.

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        • #5
          As you said ALL WW tools have the ability to remove digits and some can remove apendages. You need to read and understand the saftey section of you owners manual (I think that might be Norm's line) and have some common sense as well. IMHO the jointer is one of the safer tools when used properly (push blocks etc), same for the shaper really if you use feather boards and push blocks. Neither of these tools are as likely to kick back a chunck of wood into your body as a TS or RAS.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by papadan:
            Jointing with the planer will work, but the boards have to be straight and the same width to work. aThe easiest and fastest way to edge joint any board is to use a router with flush trim bit and a straight edge. I have put my jointer up for sale because the router method is easier and quicker. OK, now everyone can jump up and tell me how wrong I am. LOL JMHO
            Hi Papadan - I'm not sure why the router would be easier for edge jointing than the jointer...they're essentially performing the same task using the same method, and the jointer is setup as a dedicated machine for this type thing. Also, the jointer is the best machine for flattening a face IMO....much more difficult to do with a router. Is your jointer a benchtop or floor model?

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            • #7
              Screwjockey wrote:
              Ok thanks for the advise, now i have one more question. I have never used a jointer or a shaper before, and i was discussing the issue with my boss. He cautioned me to be extremely carefull with them because he knew a few people that had lost fingers on them. His suggestion was either a router or planer. I realize that all woodworking tools, well most of them, are dangerouse, and fingers can be lost at any time, but are jointers and shapers even more dangerous? please keep in mind that i have never operated either of the two and for all practical reasons am a moderately skilled woodworker, i have been doing it for a while, but there are things i have never done or don't really know how to do.
              Yes "ALL" WW tools can be dangerous if you don't know how to use them properly.

              My Uncle (a master woodworker) with over 60 years of carpentery & woodaorking experience lost the end of his right index finger 15 years ago on his shaper. A split second buck from a piece of wood and....."wham," finger end gone (down to the first knuckle.)

              When jointing you must pay attention to the way the grain runs, and run the wood through "with the grain."

              As was stated in another post "SAFETY IS PARAMOUNT & MOST IMPORTANT!!" With any tool, especially power tools.
              Dimensional Carpentry & Custom Woodworking
              Historic Renovations, Restoration, & Custom Log Homes


              I Beat The Competition Hammersdown!

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              • #8
                Heywood, My jointer is a 6" delta benchtop. Most of the time I can joint a board in one pass with the router where it takes several passes to do it on the jointer.I have never thought of using the jointer for flattening the face of the board, it would mean ripping down my wide stock to fit and I just use my planer for the faces.On the rare occasion when I have a warped board, I cut down the length before running it through the planer. I recently jointed a bunch of Walnut and Birdseye Maple for a project. Using the jointer to edge join the boards took 4-5 minutes each. With a straight edge (factory edge of 3/4" MDF)2 clamps and the router it takes less than one minute to edge join the same boards.
                info for all: http://www.hoistman.com http://www.freeyabb.com/phpbb/index....wwtoolinfoforu --- "I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me."

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                • #9
                  papadan, I used the router method before I got my jointer. I find the jointer to be far faster and more accurate. Depends on the board but I usually make 1 or 2 passes at a 1/16" - 1/8" and a finish pass at 1/32 or less.
                  I buy all my wood rough now so I also do the face on the jointer. The planer will work fine if you have dead flat boards but unless you use a sled a warped board fed through a planer becomes a thinner warped board.
                  It takes me less than a minute to face and edge a 6' X 6" rough board on the jointer.
                  I think you may not have the knives set right in reference to the outfeed table on your jointer. If you are interested here is a link to a post on the method I use for setup.
                  Jointer Knife Procedure

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